Edinburgh Cluster (Sir Walter Blacketts)

Fruit, below medium size, two inches and a half wide, and two and a quarter high; roundish or roundish ovate, obtusely angular, and rather ribbed round the eye. Skin, pale lemon yellow, very much dotted with pale brown russet and patches of the same, particularly round the base, and with a faint orange tinge next the sun. Eye, closed, with broad, erect segments, which are reflexed at the tips, set in a wide and plaited basin. Stamens, median; tube, funnel-shaped. Stalk, short and slender, set in a narrow cavity, from which branch out lines of rough russet. Flesh, white, tender, juicy, and sub-acid, with a peculiar aroma. Cells, obovate; axile, slit.

A second-rate dessert apple in the southern parts of the country, but of better quality in the north, and especially in the Border counties. November to January.

Edmonton Aromatic. See Kerry Pippin.

Edmund Jupp

Fruit, rather below medium size, roundish ovate, even and regular. Skin, smooth, yellow, sometimes with an orange tinge next the sun, strewed with a few russet spots. Eye, closed, with segments reflexcd at the tips, open, set in a narrow plaited basin. Stamens, marginal; tube, conical. Stalk, slender, very short. Flesh, yellowish, tender, juicy, and with a brisk flavour. Cells, ob-ovate; axile.

An excellent culinary apple; from September till December. The tree is a great bearer.

A Sussex apple, grown about Horsham.

Eggleton Styre

Fruit, small, two inches and a quarter wide, and two inches high; roundish, and obtusely ribbed. Skin, rich yellow, orange next the sun, and covered with patches and tracings of russet. Eye, open, with reflexed segments, set in an even basin. Stamens, median; tube, short, funnel-shaped. Stalk, half an inch long, slender, deeply inserted in a round cavity, which is lined with russet, which branches out over the base. Flesh, yellowish tender, juicy, sweet, and slightly acid. Cells, round; axile.

A Herefordshire cider apple, which was raised by Mr. William Hill, of Lower Eggleton, near Ledbury, and the tree first bore fruit in the year 1847.

Eldon Pippin

Fruit, small, two inches and a quarter wide, and two inches high; round, and somewhat oblate and angular, prominently ribbed round the eye. Skin, yellow on the shaded side, but almost entirely covered with thin crimson, which is streaked with darker crimson on the side next the sun. Eye, closed, and deeply set in a ribbed and irregular basin. Stamens, median; tube, conical or rather cup-shaped. Stalk, very short, set in a deep cavity, lined with russet, which extends over the base of the fruit. Flesh, yellowish or greenish yellow, very juicy, sweet, and richly flavoured, with a fine aroma. Cells, round; axile, slit.

A very excellent dessert apple; in use from December till April.

Elizabeth. See Golden Reinette.

Embroidered Pippin

Fruit, below medium size, two inches and a half wide, and two inches high; roundish oblate, with obtuse ribs, which extend from the base to the apex, where they terminate in prominent ridges. Skin, green on the shaded side, with a few broken streaks of pale red, but on the side next the sun it is much streaked with rather bright crimson, sprinkled with large russet dots. Eye, open, with reflexed acute segments, set in a deep and plaited basin. Stamens, median; tube, conical. Stalk, short and stout, deeply inserted in an angular ribbed cavity. Flesh, greenish, crisp, and juicy, with a brisk acidity. Cells, round; axile.

This is the Embroidered Pippin of the Horticultural Society, but is different from Fenouillet Jaune. It is a second-rate dessert apple; in use from December till January.