Several of the species are among our earliest and best known flowering shrubs, and gracilis, the smaller growing pure white species, is largely forced as an Easter plant. It is sold in pots or used for decorations, or the cut sprays are used. There is a new form of gracilis called Lemoinei, quite double, a beautiful flower and more lasting than the single. The double form is not yet quite so common and consequently is more expensive, but it will soon be grown as plentifully as gracilis. Plants for forcing of any size can be imported so cheaply and so well and compactly grown that it is useless to attempt to grow plants for forcing; they would cost you far more.

Deutzia Gracilis Trimmed with Ribbon.

Deutzia Gracilis Trimmed with Ribbon.

Those wanting to grow them to raise in the nursery for flowering shrubs can root them most easily from the young tender shoots taken from forced plants in February or March and put into the ordinary propagating bed, or from outside cuttings in June put into sand in a hotbed.

When you receive the deutzias in the month of November don't expose them to zero weather. They are a hardy plant, but after their sea voyage are poorly prepared for a hard freeze. The stems are studded to their tips with their flowering buds, so they want no pruning or you will get no flowers. Keep them protected by a coldframe and their roots covered till you pot them up for forcing. They should have about seven weeks under glass in a night temperature of 50 degrees, then they will be nicely out and not unduly forced.

For forcing we prefer to buy every year, but unsold plants if planted out make good bushes for selling with other hardy shrubs.