The Austrian briar roses are a small class with bright yellow flowers, which cover the bush when in bloom. They don't last long but are very gay and beautiful, and the plant is perfectly hardy.

There is a small class of roses that are truly monthly or continuous-blooming and yet perfectly hardy. Hermosa is a good type of this class, which botanic-ally may belong to several classes, but for our purpose we will treat them all as monthly. Agrippina is another, and the polyantha rose, Clothilde Soupert, requires the same treatment. Young plants set out in early May will continue to bloom till hard frost sets in. Some protection should be given them in winter.

These can be propagated during winter if you have a few plants growing under glass, or in October you can take the cuttings from outside and root them in the propagating bed.

Many of the Hermosa and Soupert type are forced in pots for spring sales. For this purpose plant out strong young plants in spring, and encourage them to grow till fall. Don't lift them till we have had some good sharp frosts. Then pot them and cut down to five or six good eyes and plunge in a coldframe, and be sure not to leave them without ventilation on a bright, sunny day or the buds may start, which would hurt them very much if a cold spell again caught them before they were brought in. When you bring them in start slowly and increase the heat as flowering time approaehes. Of the Soupert type there are varieties in white, pink and yellow.

Rose Mme. Alfred Carriere at Portland, Ore.

Rose Mme. Alfred Carriere at Portland, Ore.

Cut Sprays of Rose Dorothy Perkins.

Cut Sprays of Rose Dorothy Perkins.

We grew years ago a fine Bourbon rose called Appolina, a large pink flower, as good as many of the hybrid perpetuals, and a continuous bloomer. For the amateur this is a grand rose.

The Madame Plantier type are compact growing plants that come with a grand burst of bloom and are soon over, but not more so than most of our hardy shrubs, and as they are perfectly hardy they are splendid plants for a group, a hedge, or a single specimen.