A very large genus, of which a few are very familiar plants. 0. rosea (floribunda) and O. lutea (yellow) are grown as pot plants and sold in the spring, and they make excellent basket plants, but not mixed with other plants. They do much better and have a finer effect when in a mass by themselves. An earthen basket or suspended pan is better for the oxalis than a wire basket, but either will do.

They divide readily, which is best done in winter when the plants are partly dormant. They dislike a wet, heavy soil, and need a good, light loam, well drained, and an airy, sunny exposure. In the fall give them less water, and for December, January and February they could rest under a dry bench in a cool house with very little water. In March start them growing and divide if you wish.

They can also be raised from seed. There are a great many species, having yellow, white, pink and violet flowers, all greenhouse perennials, besides a few that are annuals. The two well-known species mentioned are easy to grow and very free blooming.

The Lower Box Shows the First Layer of Blooms. The Upper Box is Filled and Iced, Ready for Closing Up.

The Lower Box Shows the First Layer of Blooms. The Upper Box is Filled and Iced, Ready for Closing Up.