I believe there is only one way to profitably grow a moderate-sized, healthy pot plant, that will keep its foliage and really be respectable in November. Choose healthy, young plants, that have been propagated in April. If they have been stopped once and are in 3-inch pots, so much the better. By the middle of June you will have some vacant benches to spare by the clearing of bedding plants, or you may throw away a bench of carnations. Five or six inches of soil on the bench will do, and even if it has grown carnations the previous winter, is good enough, with the addition of bone flour and a little rotted manure.

Plant fifteen to eighteen inches apart. They will make a fine growth during summer and should have all their growths stopped at least twice before lifting. You have them under perfect control by this method, and can keep them watered and syringed, as well as keeping the aphis subdued. From August 15 to about August 25 is a good time to lift these plants from the bench, which should be done with a digging fork, and by getting the fork down flat on bottom of bench you need not lose a fiber. These plants grow a great deal after lifting, so don't crowd them into too small a pot. We find a 6, 7 or 8-inch suits the different varieties. A few days of shading and a frequent syringing and they will have taken hold of the new soil, when you must give them a light, airy house.

Chrysanthemum Midge as a Pot Plant.

Chrysanthemum Midge as a Pot Plant.

These plants on an average have twelve to twenty buds, each branch disbudding to one flower. Most of them can be tied by one stake in the center and thread or raffia leading to each branch; larger plants, such as Lincoln always makes, will require several stakes; but let them be always small and inconspicuous. Only a few varieties are adapted to this purpose. The short jointed, dwarf varieties are the ones, and of all varieties that I have tried, Ivory and Lincoln are the ideals. Maud Dean is pretty fair, and so is Bonnaffon, And there must be many newer varieties of a compact growth suited for this purpose.