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The Garden Week By Week Throughout The Year | by Walter P. Wright



A practical handbook to gardening. Operations for every week in the year and to the culture of all important plants with numerous coloured plates and half-tone engravings and one hundred practical illustrations

TitleThe Garden Week By Week Throughout The Year
AuthorWalter P. Wright
PublisherDoubleday Page & Company
Year1911
Copyright1911, Doubleday Page & Company
AmazonThe Garden Week by Week Throughout the Year
The Garden Week By Week Throughout The Year.

By Walter P. Wright, Horticultural Superintendent Under The Kent County Council Author Of "Popular Garden Flowers," " The Perfect Garden," Etc.

Second Edition

From a Water Colour Drawing by E. A. Rowe.

Traveller's Joy on a Gate Pillar at Montacute, Somersetshire.

From a Water Colour Drawing by E. A. Rowe.

-Preface
A brief calendar of gardening operations throughout the year has formed an item in many books on horticulture; it has been put in as a kind of summary. Readers have not been wanting who have declar...
-Chapter I. Jan. The Opening Year
When does the garden year begin? The enthusiast would declare that it has no beginning and no ending. But whatever may be the case with the garden itself, it is certain that a book about gardens mu...
-Jan. The Opening Year. Part 2
How To Get Catalogues Is the reader a beginner in gardening? Is he ignorant of the names of seedsmen? Is he one of those unhappy beings who own no membership of gardening societies ? The way to inv...
-Jan. The Opening Year. Part 3
How To Select Seeds That happy being who is sufficiently well off to be able to select any kind of plants that he wants may choose from the specialities of the best seed houses with the certainty o...
-Jan. The Opening Year. Part 4
Vegetables For Small Town Gardens Vegetables are rarely grown in small town gardens, partly because space is very limited, partly because supplies are brought to the door by greengrocers. Practical...
-Jan. The Opening Year. Part 5
Standard Varieties Of The Principal Flowers Raised From Seed Although the greater number of the most important vegetables are raised from seed, this is not the case with flowers. Roses are generall...
-Jan. The Opening Year. Part 6
China Or Annual Asters These beautiful half-hardy annuals have been specialised to such an extent that nearly a dozen distinct types are now sold by seedsmen. They differ in the height to which the...
-Jan. The Opening Year. Part 7
Bulbs, Tubers, And Other Roots We have not quite done with the seedsman's catalogue when we have made the selections of vegetable and flower seeds that we want for our year's supply, because it gen...
-January - First And Second Weeks
I said at the opening of the present chapter that January is in the main a month of preparation. There are rarely any outdoor flowers in the first half of the month, although, if the winter be mild, t...
-January - First And Second Weeks. Flowers
There is work to be done among greenhouse plants, and also in raising plants for later use in the flower garden. Begonias [Tuberous) There are few more beautiful late-flowering garden plants...
-January - First And Second Weeks. Flowers. Part 2
Gloxinias From Seed Like Begonias, these beautiful plants have to form tubers before they can develop, and it is therefore wise to sow a packet of seed early in January. They are among the most bea...
-January - First And Second Weeks. Flowers. Part 3
Blue Lobelias There are still plenty of people left in the world who use blue Lobelias for borders in the flower garden, although the ribbon border, of which it formed a part, no longer enjoys it...
-January - First And Second Weeks. Fruit
Although fruit trees may be planted theoretically at any time from November to March inclusive, January is rarely a good month for planting. The soil is cold, and perhaps messy. But pruning may be d...
-January - First And Second Weeks. Fruit. Part 2
Pruning Apricots The Apricot is not much grown in these days, because people who have wall space prefer to use it for cordon Apples and Pears, the planting of which I shall recommend in November. A...
-January - First And Second Weeks. Fruit. Part 3
Pruning Gooseberries Although January is a good month for pruning Gooseberries so far as the bushes are concerned, birds have to be considered. The more a Gooseberry bush is pruned, the easier it i...
-January - First And Second Weeks. Fruit. Part 4
Pruning Pears The Pear bears its fruit on spurs, which mature slowly but steadily. Before the days of the Quince stock for Pears, the spurs developed very slowly, hence the old line: Plant Pear...
-January - First And Second Weeks. Vegetables
Little, if any, work other than preparing soil, and manuring, is likely to be possible out of doors, but vegetables can be forced under glass. Early Asparagus Asparagus is not often forced i...
-January - Third And Fourth Weeks
The weather conditions are not likely to change much in the two sections of the month - or rather, they are not likely to depart very much from a certain order of changes. There will be some frost, pr...
-January - Third And Fourth Weeks. Continued
Garden Paths People who are laying out new gardens often find the walks a rather harassing problem. They see gravel paths in most places which they visit, and, lacking experience suppose that two o...
-January - Third And Fourth Weeks. Flowers
Roses Those beautiful Roses, Bridesmaid, Catherine Mermet, Ulrich Brunner, Captain Hayward, Mrs. John Laing, and Niphetos will flower delightfully in the warm conservatory in spring if plants are p...
-January - Third And Fourth Weeks. Flowers. Part 2
Solving Sweet Peas It is not in the least too early to sow a few pots or boxes of Sweet Peas. A choice may be made from the varieties named in a previous part of the present chapter, but let me her...
-January - Third And Fourth Weeks. Flowers. Part 3
New Lawns Makers of lawns should never hesitate between turves and seeds so long as they can get the former free from weeds. When you have laid your turves the lawn is made - that is, if the soil h...
-January - Third And Fourth Weeks. Fruit
Although, as mentioned in the first section of the present chapter, January is often not a good month for planting fruit trees, there is no reason why plans and preparations should not be made for mak...
-January - Third And Fourth Weeks. Vegetables
The tendency is to empty rather than fill the kitchen garden throughout this month, for the supply of winter greens is steadily reduced, the Celery rows become shorter, and Asparagus, Seakale, and Rhu...
-January Gardening In Brief - A Resume
We see that January is not an ideal planting month, and that those who have fruit and other trees and shrubs to put in will generally do better to let January be a month of preparation than of plantin...
-Chapter II. Feb. Many Buds, Some Bloom, And The Early Bird
How baffling is the problem of the birds! It beats at us sharply in February, because early flowers are opening in warm places - flowers of a kind that the birds find a peculiar pleasure in pulling to...
-February - First And Second Weeks. Flowers
We must continue our work of soil preparation this month, and endeavour to complete all big alterations or additions, such as making borders, rockeries, lawns, paths, arches, pergolas, and fruit trell...
-February - First And Second Weeks. Flowers. Part 2
Indian Pinks Every member of the great genus Dianthus has its admirers, and when we remember that it embraces the Carnation, the White Cottage Pink, and the Sweet William, we realise its great valu...
-February - First And Second Weeks. Flowers. Part 3
Stocks For Pots Do amateurs in general know the East Lothian Stock, I wonder? It is a form of the Intermediate, a dwarf Stock of neat habit, the special value of which lies in the fact that it will...
-February - First And Second Weeks. Flowers. Part 4
Streptocarpuses The up-to-date amateur has already learned that the Streptocarpus is one of the modern pets of professional florists, who have given it larger flowers and richer colours. He has als...
-February - First And Second Weeks. Flowers. Part 5
The Marechal Niel On The Greenhouse Roof I am not sure that we see it so often as we used to do, that rampant, strong-caned, glorious Marechal Niel. A good many of the plants have died out through ...
-February - First And Second Weeks. Flowers. Part 6
Zonal And Ivy-Leaved Geraniums Although the Zonal Geranium is supposed to have declined as a garden plant (as a matter of fact, it has not done anything of the kind), it is reputed to have increase...
-February - First And Second Weeks. Fruit
What was said of January, as regards planting, applies also to February; but I would rather plant in February than January if, from one cause or other, fruit trees had to be put in before March. The g...
-February - First And Second Weeks. Fruit. Part 2
Staking Fruit Trees Amateurs, who are not in the way of providing every kind of accessory required in gardening, are often bothered by what, with the large grower, is a commonplace thing. Thus, whe...
-February - First And Second Weeks. Fruit. Part 3
Good Raspberries Antwerp Superlative. Strawberries February is often a good month for planting Strawberries, and whether it is good or bad turns principally on the weather and the state of the soil...
-February - First And Second Weeks. Fruit. Part 4
Peaches And Nectarines Culturally, these delicious fruits count as one, whether grown out of doors or under glass. They are not really so hardy as Apples and Pears, but then they are very rarely gr...
-February - First And Second Weeks. Vegetables
It is still too early to sow out of doors, except in such specially favourable circumstances as were referred to in Chapter I (Jan. The Opening Year)., - that is, a dry, crumbly state of the soil foll...
-February - Third And Fourth Weeks. Feb. 15-28
The days are now lengthening appreciably. Our cycle lighting-up time-table for the meridian of Greenwich tells us that at the middle of February we may leave our lamps unlit till some ten minutes p...
-February - Third And Fourth Weeks. Flowers
Christmas Roses Almost every amateur is interested in the Christmas Rose - the Helleborus niger of botanists. He loves to think of outdoor flowers at mid-winter, there are so few. And he really can...
-February - Third And Fourth Weeks. Flowers. Part 2
Orange And Salmon Clivias Winter is the flowering season of the Clivia, with its orange, salmon, or vermilion bell-shaped flowers, and long, narrow leaves. It is a capital plant for the amateur's c...
-February - Third And Fourth Weeks. Flowers. Part 3
Hydrangeas Readers have read of the wonderful Hydrangeas that grow around the late Mr. Cecil Rhodes' Cape home, Groote Schuur. I am told by the people who know the plants and the man that they were...
-February - Third And Fourth Weeks. Fruit
Outdoor Figs The present is a good period for pruning and training Figs on open walls. Figs are not grown in many gardens, and where they are, they are generally left to take care of themselves. Th...
-February - Third And Fourth Weeks. Vegetables
As noted previously, outdoor sowing must be guided by the weather and the state of the soil. Given fine weather and crumbly soil, early Peas, Broad Beans, Turnips, and Spinach may be sown out of doors...
-The Garden In February - A Resume
Like January, February is in the main a month of preparation. It is rarely that dry, settled weather permits of regular work in the open air, but seed and plant orders may be prepared, stores procured...
-Chapter III. March. The Dawn Of Spring
The winter wanes. Spring is stealing out of the south. It is not with us yet, but it is near. There are blossoms on many shrubs, and the earth is bright with early bulbs. There are the yellow of Crocu...
-March - First And Second Weeks. Flowers
Primarily, we shall see to our hardy plants, which are the backbone of the modern garden. We shall overhaul those that we have, propagate the desirable, curb the rampant, add new elements. And we shal...
-March - First And Second Weeks. Flowers. Part 2
Colour Schones With Hardy Plants Let me give a few examples of colour groups, and show the plants which can be used for forming them. We can have neighbouring groups of mauve, red, and white. You m...
-March - First And Second Weeks. Flowers. Part 3
Annuals In Herbaceous Borders It will be seen that I do not suggest the restriction of herbaceous borders to perennial plants. Annuals are very useful, because of their quick flowering from outdoor...
-March - First And Second Weeks. Flowers. Part 4
Medium Growers Alstromerias, in variety Anemone Japonica, and varieties Campanula Persicifolia, blue. Alba, white. Chrysanthemum Maximum, in variety Geranium Pratense, blue Gy...
-March - First And Second Weeks. Flowers. Part 5
Planting Roses In the autumn chapters I give the orthodox advice about planting Roses, but what of the amateur who, about to begin gardening, reads this book in spring? He will want to know if he r...
-March - First And Second Weeks. Flowers. Part 6
The Early Pruning Of Established Roses With a mild February, the Roses which we already have in the garden may be fairly in growth when March opens; indeed, in mild districts they are almost certai...
-March - First And Second Weeks. Flowers. Part 7
Climbing And Weeping Roses Climbing Roses, suitable for arches, pillars, pergolas, walls, and summer-houses are abundant. Varieties suitable for growing as standards, and drooping their branches, a...
-March - First And Second Weeks. Flowers. Part 8
And A Hint About Slugs What the wireworm is under ground, the slug is above it - a voracious, exasperating enemy, with no limits to its appetite. The slug has its favourite dishes, but if they are ...
-March - First And Second Weeks. Flowers. Part 9
Seedling Begonias And Other Choice Flowers It is in the very early stages of small-seeded plants like tuberous Begonias, herbaceous Calceolarias and Gloxinias that the most care is required with se...
-Ferns
Graceful and popular Ferns like the Maidenhair, the Ribbon, the Hartstongue, the Spleenworts, the Lady, the Male, the Ostrich, and the Royal are grown in many thousands of gardens, some being cultivat...
-March - First And Second Weeks. Fruit
The work indicated for the latter half of February may be continued in March. Pruning and planting should be completed, as before the month is out many trees will be starting growth. Pruning Nu...
-March - First And Second Weeks. Vegetables
In light soils, and on warm sites, the sowing of various kinds of vegetables may proceed, notably Peas, Broad Beans, Turnips, Spinach, early Carrots, Onions, Parsley, Brussels Sprouts, Lettuces, and R...
-March - First And Second Weeks. Vegetables. Continued
Young Tomatoes Seedling Tomatoes raised by sowing a few weeks ago must be attended to. They ought to have a position close to the glass, and receive abundance of air in favourable weather, so that ...
-March - Third And Fourth Weeks. March 16-31
The second half of March will not be less busy than the first, and may be far more so if the weather in the first half is unfavourable for gardening, as is often the case. The latter part of March fre...
-March - Third And Fourth Weeks. Flowers
It is unnecessary to repeat what was said in the first section of March about preparing and planting herbaceous borders. This task is one which will afford pleasurable occupation in favourable weather...
-March - Third And Fourth Weeks. Flowers. Continued
Rockery Plants The rock garden is full of interest in spring, and now is the time to go over it carefully, restricting here, propagating there, making additions both of stones and plants. One of my...
-Some Carpeting Plants
The above lists give an indication of the genera available at different seasons. I may now specify a few plants that are particularly valuable for forming large masses, drooping over the stones in a b...
-Rock Plants For Shade
The great majority of rock plants love sunshine. It is one of the life-giving elements of the Alpines in their mountain homes. Rock gardens should never be made in shade, but where a natural rockery e...
-Rock Plants For Shade. Continued
Polygonum Affine Rose, dwarf, a summer bloomer. Some of the Polygonums are very large plants, and could not be used in rockwork. Polyanthuses And Primroses Best raised from reliable strai...
-March - Third And Fourth Weeks. Fruit
Continue the work previously indicated for the various kinds of indoor fruit. Peaches and Nectarines in unheated houses will probably be in bloom now, and the wires may be shaken in order to scatte...
-March - Third And Fourth Weeks. Vegetables
Sowing for the main supply of the year should be in progress soon, and with the soil in a crumbly state it may be done during the latter half of March. Broad Beans may be sown at the depth and dist...
-March - Third And Fourth Weeks. Vegetables. Part 2
Egg Plants, Capsicum, And Chilies Although these plants have their culinary uses, principally in condiments, British gardeners use them more as ornamental plants. They all bear attractive fruits, a...
-March - Third And Fourth Weeks. Vegetables. Part 3
Lettuces More Lettuces may be sown for early summer salads. There is a wastage of Lettuces owing to the plants running to seed quicker than they can be used if many are grown in one batch, hence th...
-March - Third And Fourth Weeks. Vegetables. Part 4
Potatoes Many gardeners plant the bulk of their Potatoes in the latter half of March, and there is certainly no objection, provided that the soil is friable and merely damp, not cloggy. The groun...
-March - Third And Fourth Weeks. Vegetables. Part 5
Shallots And Potato Onions There should be no further delay in planting these, as it is already late. Planting bulbs of Shallots cost about a shilling a pound, of Potato Onions about sixpence. The ...
-The Garden In March - A Resume
March is the dawn of the gardening year. Vegetation becomes active. Trees and shrubs break into growth. Herbaceous plants begin to move. Roses swell their buds and even break into leaf. Early bulbs bl...
-Chapter IV. April. Late Showers And Early Flowers
When February fill-dyke has played its traditional part, the April garden is full of promise. The well-moistened soil promotes a strong flow of sap. Shrubs and fruit trees burst their fat buds. Bulb...
-April - First And Second Weeks. April 1-15. Flowers
Planting And Pruning Roses Early April is the latest period of the spring when it is safe to transplant Roses. Even now it will be well to syringe them after planting if there is no rain, in order ...
-April - First And Second Weeks. April 1-15. Flowers. Part 2
Hardy Annuals Early April is generally the best time of the year for sowing hardy annuals out of doors, because the soil has become well warmed by the spring sun, and is in a condition to crumble f...
-April - First And Second Weeks. April 1-15. Flowers. Part 3
Sowing Lawn Grass Seed April is nominally the best month in the year for sowing Grass seed, but it sometimes happens that it is the worst. If cold winds prevail the ground is chilled, and the seed ...
-April - First And Second Weeks. April 1-15. Flowers. Part 4
Aconitum Sparks' variety is a fine deep blue Monkshood. Adonis Amurensis is a handsome yellow species from Japan, with fern-like foliage, flowering in February and March. It grows a foot high. Ther...
-Climbers And Wall Shrubs
There is no practical reason why wall plants should be planted later than Roses or fruit trees - in fact, a good reason can be adduced in favour of early planting; but it has grown to be so much a mat...
-Climbers And Wall Shrubs. Part 2
Crataegus Lelandii Crataegus Lelandii is a handsome Thorn, the chief beauty of which is the crop of handsome scarlet berries which it carries through the winter. It is superior to the old Pyracant...
-Climbers And Wall Shrubs. Part 3
The Everlasting Peas The Everlasting Peas belong to the same genus (Lathyrus) as the Sweet Peas, and have flowers of similar form, but scentless. They are hardy perennials, and, although scarcely s...
-April - First And Second Weeks. Fruit
The grafting of fruit trees, the details of which were given in the last chapter, ought to be completed in the early part of April. Vines will be starting in unheated houses. Thin Grapes on early V...
-April - First And Second Weeks. Vegetables
Successions of Broad Beans, Peas, Turnips, Spinach, Carrots, Onions, Celery, Tomatoes, and Leeks may be sown. (See previous chapter). Artichokes The Globe, Jerusalem and Chinese Artichokes m...
-April - Third And Fourth Weeks. April 16-30. Flowers
Half-Hardy Annuals Those who lack the facilities for raising Asters, Ten-week Stocks, Marigolds, Phlox Drummondi, and the other half-hardy annuals recommended in previous chapters for sowing under ...
-April - Third And Fourth Weeks. April 16-30. Flowers. Part 2
Propagating Poinsettias Poinsettia Pulcherrima, with its carmine-rose bracts, is as brilliant as any flowering plant, and there are few gardeners who do not grow it. It is not an easy plant to stri...
-April - Third And Fourth Weeks. Fruit
Work in the fruit garden and houses in the second half of April will be principally as follows: (1) Completing the grafting of trees. (2) Disbudding, tying down and stopping Vines, and thinning ...
-April - Third And Fourth Weeks. Vegetables
Asparagus Complete the making of new beds and the sowing of seeds. Beetroot A sowing of the Globe may be made, scattering the seed thinly in drills drawn a foot apart and an inch deep in ...
-The Garden In April - A Resume
In April we almost complete the sowing of seeds for giving flowers and vegetables during the current summer; we stimulate the growth of young plants that have sprung from earlier sowings by hoeing; an...
-Chapter V. May. May Morns
It has been my endeavour to prepare the reader gently for certain little trials in gardening. I have let fall words of warning about insects and fungi - about slugs and aphides, mildew and caterpillar...
-May - First And Second Weeks
May is bedding-out month in the garden, and in mild districts tender plants are put out during the first half of the month. The bedding system still keeps its grip on public gardens, and with the ad...
-May - First And Second Weeks. Part 2
Primulas For Next Winter Fringed Primulas are great favourites for flowering in heated greenhouses and conservatories in winter, and now is the time to sow seed. The seedsman sells them under the n...
-May - First And Second Weeks. Part 3
Hardy Ferns Many British and other hardy Ferns begin growing towards the end of April or early in May, and the uncoiling of the fronds may be taken as the signal for planting. Peat and loam in equa...
-May - First And Second Weeks. Fruit
Grapes Grape Vines will be in various stages, according to whether they were started in January, February, or March. Those which are swelling up their crop will not require a great deal of manipula...
-May - First And Second Weeks. Vegetables
Kidney Beans In mild, sheltered places Scarlet Runner, as well as French dwarf Kidney Beans, may be sown. Ne Plus Ultra, Kentish Invicta, Best of All, and Scarlet Emperor are all good varieties of ...
-May - Third And Fourth Weeks. May 16-31. Flowers
For those who practise bedding out, the latter part of May will be a busy time. It is also a good period for sowing biennials for blooming the following year. Thinning and staking need attention. ...
-May - Third And Fourth Weeks. May 16-31. Flowers. Part 2
Preparing And Planting Beds Bulbs that are taken out of flower beds in spring need not be regarded as useless. Tulips and Daffodils nearly always, Hyacinths often, do well again the following year....
-May - Third And Fourth Weeks. Fruit
The Progress Of Grafts Fruit trees that were grafted in accordance with the instructions given in March will now be growing. In addition to the grafts themselves, it is possible that shoots may be ...
-May - Third And Fourth Weeks. Vegetables
Asparagus Continue to cut as previously advised and give a sprinkling of salt, followed by a soaking of liquid manure. These applications will strengthen the plants and improve the crop. Bea...
-The Garden In May - A Resume
The warmer, longer days, the rapid development of plants, and the greater abundance of leaf and bloom combine to render May a pleasant month in the garden. The gardener begins to see some results of h...
-Chapter VI. June. Rose Time
It is a poor garden that does not show Roses in June, and in the early part of the month too. Nothing is more amazing, and at the same time more delightful, than the way in which Roses bound into bloo...
-June - First And Second Weeks. The Lawn
June is an interesting month with the lawn. The Grass has been growing freely for several weeks. But weeds have been growing too. Some Nature lovers like to see Daisies in lawns, but the most confirme...
-Flowers. Sowing Biennials
One of the first tasks in the flower garden is to raise a good quantity of biennial plants, such as Canterbury Bells, Foxgloves, Wallflowers, and Sweet Williams, from seed for planting out in autumn t...
-Interesting Hardy Plants That May Be Raised From Seed In June
Achilleas Or Milfoils Of which there are several species or varieties, Ptarmica The Pearl being one of the best. Aconitums Or Monkshoods Of which both the blue and the white, Napellus and...
-Interesting Hardy Plants That May Be Raised From Seed In June. Part 2
The Arabises, Or Rock Cresses The Arabises, Or Rock Cresses, are well-known dwarf plants, which form cushions of grey-green foliage on stones and in beds, and flower profusely in spring, lasting un...
-Interesting Hardy Plants That May Be Raised From Seed In June. Part 3
Calandrinia Umbellata Calandrinia Umbellata, the Rock Purslane, is an extremely pretty plant, with magenta flowers, and thrives in hot positions on the rockery. A variety with rosy carmine flowers ...
-Interesting Hardy Plants That May Be Raised From Seed In June. Part 4
Centaurea Macrocephala Centaurea Macrocephala, the Giant Knapweed, with its large heads of yellow flowers, is a notable plant; and C. montana, the blue perennial Cornflower, is popular. Red ...
-Interesting Hardy Plants That May Be Raised From Seed In June. Part 5
Crucianella Stylosa Crucianella Stylosa, the Crosswort, grows about six inches high, and has rosy flowers. Delphiniums Delphiniums (several useful species of perennial Larkspur) come true...
-Interesting Hardy Plants That May Be Raised From Seed In June. Part 6
The Echinaceas The Echinaceas have been described as purple Sunflowers. They are tall plants, reaching four feet in height. Echinops Ritro Echinops Ritro reminds the amateur of the sea ...
-Interesting Hardy Plants That May Be Raised From Seed In June. Part 7
The Gentians The Gentians give us blue of so deep a tone that Gentian blue has come to be referred to as a standard of richness by gardeners. The plants are hardy perennials of dwarf growth, sui...
-Interesting Hardy Plants That May Be Raised From Seed In June. Part 8
The French Honeysuckle (Hedysarum Coronarium) The French Honeysuckle (Hedysarum Coronarium), with red flowers, growing about two feet high, and its white variety, Album, are useful plants. ...
-Interesting Hardy Plants That May Be Raised From Seed In June. Part 9
Isatis Glauca Isatis Glauca is a fine and graceful plant, bearing light sprays of yellow flowers. Little known at present, it is likely to become a popular border perennial. Seed can be got of a...
-Interesting Hardy Plants That May Be Raised From Seed In June. Part 10
The Perennial Lupins The Perennial Lupins give us some valuable plants, notably Arboreus, the Tree Lupin, with scented yellow flowers; its white variety Snow Queen, which is a really beautiful plan...
-Interesting Hardy Plants That May Be Raised From Seed In June. Part 11
Myosotis Palustris Myosotis Palustris is the true Forget-me-not. It is a natural bog plant. The other species do well in moist soil, but are not really bad in light, dryish soil. There is a white v...
-Interesting Hardy Plants That May Be Raised From Seed In June. Part 12
The Pentstemon The Pentstemon has now become a recognised florists' flower, and named varieties are propagated by means of cuttings in autumn, but a splendid collection can be grown from seed. The ...
-Interesting Hardy Plants That May Be Raised From Seed In June. Part 13
The Self-Heal (Prunella Grandiflora) The Self-Heal (Prunella Grandiflora) is a purple-flowered dwarf perennial, flowering in early summer. The Florists' Pyrethrums The Florists' Pyrethrum...
-Interesting Hardy Plants That May Be Raised From Seed In June. Part 14
The Houseleeks (Sempervivum) The Houseleeks (Sempervivum) are greatly valued for the rockery. Arachnoideum, the Cobweb Houseleek, rosy flowers in summer, is one of the best known. Senecio Ma...
-Interesting Hardy Plants That May Be Raised From Seed In June. Part 15
The Speedwells (Veronica) The Speedwells (Veronica) may be raised from seed, and Gentianoides, with its bright blue flowers, is one of the best known. There is a larger variety of it named Major, a...
-June - First And Second Weeks. Fruit
Grape Vines With the increased sun heat, the temperature of vineries will run up to 850 or 900, and artificial means of heating will be required no longer. It does not matter how high the temperatu...
-June - First And Second Weeks. Vegetables
Beans More Runners and dwarf French Beans may be sown. Broad Beans may be in full bloom; if so, a sharp look-out should be kept for black fly in the growing tips, as it appears about the time that ...
-June - Third And Fourth Weeks. June 16-30. Flowers
Fibrous-Rooted Begonias The tuberous Begonias are rightly esteemed for their magnificent flowers, and we have seen how they may be raised from seed in winter, or grown from tubers in spring. So fin...
-June - Third And Fourth Weeks. June 16-30. Flowers. Continued
Insuring Fine Roses With the Rose season close upon us, we can do a great deal to insure fine flowers by thinning the buds and feeding the plants with liquid manure. The flower buds generally come ...
-June - Third And Fourth Weeks. Fruit
Thinning Fruit It is not often that amateur fruit growers practise thinning. They are too pleased to have the fruit to part with any of it. This is all very well in its way, but it is possible to h...
-June - Third And Fourth Weeks. Vegetables
Asparagus The last cutting of the season should be made not later than the middle of June. Henceforth the plants should be allowed to grow unchecked, and a full bed in autumn will be all in favour ...
-The Garden In June - A Resume
The rapid development of plants in spring, and particularly the opening of the Rose season, affords great pleasure to the garden lover. Work increases but it is agreeable work. The lawn should have sp...
-Chapter VII. July. The Heart Of The Year
The garden lover who is occupied away from home, possibly in a town office, for the greater part of every week day, enjoys his garden to the full in July. The town streets are suffocatingly hot in the...
-July. The Heart Of The Year. Continued
Gathering Flowers And Saving Seed Flowers should be gathered regularly and continuously, and they should be gathered while they are still young, partly because they are fresh, partly because of the...
-July - First And Second Weeks. July 1-15
Sowing Herbaceous Calceolarias The herbaceous Calceolaria is a popular greenhouse plant in spring. The pouch-like flowers are as large as pigeon's eggs, borne in scores, and most beautifully marked...
-July - First And Second Weeks. Fruit
Thinning Apples Apples ought to be swelling up their fruit steadily now, and finer examples will develop if, where the fruits hang thickly, they are reduced to two per spur than where they are allo...
-July - First And Second Weeks. Vegetables
Cauliflowers Plants raised in April, and transplanted from the seed bed, ought now to be sturdy, and have abundance of fibrous roots. If there is a piece of ground free, they may be planted at once...
-July - Third And Fourth Weeks. July 16-31. Flowers
Several important operations often come on during the second week of July, notably budding Roses, layering Carnations, and manipulating Chrysanthemum buds. In each of these cases the exact period is d...
-July - Third And Fourth Weeks. July 16-31. Flowers. Part 2
Propagating Carnations And Pinks Whether the Carnation grower cultivates his plants under names or not (if he is an enthusiast he generally keeps his varieties labelled), there are always a few sor...
-July - Third And Fourth Weeks. July 16-31. Flowers. Part 3
The Crown Buds Of Prize Chrysanthemums By reference to that popular plant the Chrysanthemum at appropriate seasons, we have carried it to a very interesting stage - the stage when it may be expe...
-July - Third And Fourth Weeks. July 16-31. Flowers. Part 4
Lifting And Dividing Daffodils Narcissi and Daffodils will have completed their growth by now, and may be taken up for division. There will be large bulbs and small in the clumps - bulbs large enou...
-July - Third And Fourth Weeks. Fruit
Propagating Strawberries The propagation of Strawberries by means of runners should be continued in accordance with previous advice. The runners may be rooted in small pots plunged in the soil roun...
-July - Third And Fourth Weeks. Vegetables
Late Celery And Leeks These may be planted in trenches. If the weather is dry, water and shade until the plants start growing afresh. Disease In Potatoes If wet, muggy weather should prev...
-The Garden In July - A Resume
In July the garden should be in full beauty and productiveness, and the aim of the gardener must be to keep a tight grip on the ground that he has made, and see that every advantage gained is followed...
-Chapter VIII. Aug. The Harvest Month In The Garden
I have said that the genuine enthusiast in gardening recognises no beginning and no ending to a horticultural year. He does not go into winter quarters in October, and resume operations in April. Th...
-August - First And Second Weeks. Aug. 1-15. Flowers
The two important operations of layering Carnations and budding Roses may be carried on in the manner advised in the previous chapter. Taking Chrysanthemum Buds The bud system of Chrysanthem...
-August - First And Second Weeks. Aug. 1-15. Flowers. Continued
Zonal Geraniums For Winter Zonals in pots, struck from cuttings a few weeks ago, will be sturdy plants now, possibly in a cold frame. It is Geranium nature to start flowering at the first opportuni...
-August - First And Second Weeks. Fruit
Budding Apples And Other Fruit Trees The great majority of the fruit trees which are bought from nurserymen have been budded by them on to stocks such as Paradise, Quince, Crab, and Pear. Budding i...
-August - First And Second Weeks. Fruit. Continued
Ripening Figs Outdoor Figs will be ripening now, and as the fruit is of very little flavour unless quite ripe, it will have to hang for some time at the mercy of the birds unless netted, and they a...
-August - First And Second Weeks. Vegetables
Asparagus Interest in Asparagus beds is not, as a rule, so lively in August as in May, but it should be remembered that the success of the spring crop depends in a great measure on the growth which...
-August - Third And Fourth Weeks. Aug. 16-31
Auriculas In years gone by the Auricula was a great pet of the florists, and was grown in pots for exhibition. There were two great classes, the Stage and the Alpine. The varieties in the former we...
-August - Third And Fourth Weeks. Aug. 16-31. Continued
Calceolarias, Cinerarias, Cyclamens, And Primulas Young plants raised from seed for flowering in winter and spring will be at various stages of growth. Some will be in small pots, and may be transf...
-August - Third And Fourth Weeks. Fruit
Gathering Apples And Pears The progress of the season is marked by the fact that some of the earlier varieties - such as Irish Peach, Lady Sudeley, Mr. Gladstone, Duchess of Oldenburg, Lord Suffiel...
-August - Third And Fourth Weeks. Vegetables
Broccoli If Broccoli, and other kinds of winter Greens, have been planted between Potatoes, the crop of which is now being lifted, the plants should be made thoroughly firm by levelling the soil an...
-The Garden In August - A Resume
August is the great holiday month of the year, and gardens sometimes deteriorate owing to the absence of their owners. Where professional gardeners are not kept, an arrangement should be made to have ...
-Chapter IX. Sept. In Indian Summers
In Indian summers the September garden is a place of joy. The delicious, dewy mornings have the freshness of April, the noons have the warmth of June, the evenings are mild and sweet. Statisticians...
-September - First And Second Weeks. Sept. 1-15. Flowers
Arum Lilies We decided to plant our Arum Lilies out of doors late in spring, in order to save that necessity for incessant watering which exists when the plants are kept in pots. We planted them in...
-September - First And Second Weeks. Sept. 1-15. Flowers. Continued
Dahlias In Bloom September is the great month of the Dahlia, and the most must be got out of the plant that it can possibly give. Sometimes the flowers do not show up very well, owing to being part...
-September - First And Second Weeks. Fruit
Figs On Outdoor Walls The young wood which has formed on Fig trees during the past summer should not be allowed to sway loose and wild in the wind, but should be nailed into the wall with shreds. I...
-September - First And Second Weeks. Vegetables
Work is not very active in the kitchen garden during the early part of September, but the work of clearing ground of mature or exhausted crops goes on steadily. Celery The main crop may be e...
-September - Third And Fourth Weeks. Flowers. Sept. 16-30
Arum Lilies Plants in the garden that have been checked by being cut round with a spade will be ready to lift now. They should be potted as fast as they are taken up, as if left lying about they mi...
-September - Third And Fourth Weeks. Fruit
Gathering The gathering and storing of fruit will continue to engage attention. Several of our best Pears, notably Beurre Diel, Souvenir du Congres, Conference, Fertility, Marie Louise, Doynne Boussoc...
-September - Third And Fourth Weeks. Vegetables
Brussels Sprouts In speaking of the planting of Brussels Sprouts in an earlier chapter, it was recommended to plant them wide apart, in order that they might not grow into each other. There is anot...
-The Garden In September - A Resume
With regular attention to mowing, hoeing, and the removal of decaying flowers, the garden ought to be bright, pleasant, and interesting in September. Sweet Peas should still be beautiful if seed forma...
-Chapter X. Oct. A New Outlook
I WANT a word - a friendly, confidential word - with garden-loving folk who are sensitive to external surroundings, and influenced by every passing variation in the weather. There is no play on the fa...
-October - First And Second Weeks. Flowers
Let us clear up a few odd tasks connected with the flower garden, and so make room for the great study of the bulbs. Tuberous Begonias Early October often sees the lovely tuberous Begonias a...
-October - First And Second Weeks. Flowers. Part 2
Cinerarias And Herbaceous Calceolarias If the advice to keep these plants in cold frames through the summer has been followed, they ought to be strong and sturdy now. They may be kept in the frames...
-October - First And Second Weeks. Flowers. Part 3
Lilies For Pots Several of the Liliums are deservedly popular plants for pot cultivation, as they make a charming display in conservatories. Candidum is sometimes grown, though the old Madonna Lil...
-October - First And Second Weeks. Fruit
Grapes Vines in early houses - that is, those which are started in winter to fruit in early summer - will now be quite mature, and the laterals may be pruned to the plump bud at the base. The rods ...
-October - First And Second Weeks. Vegetables
Lifting Beetroot And Carrots The main crops of these two useful vegetables are now mature, and may be taken up and stored. The fork should be used with care, especially in the case of Beetroot, as ...
-October - Third And Fourth Weeks. Flowers
Re-Planting Flower Beds For Spring Except in very mild seasons the summer plants, even Begonias, will now be over, and the beds may be cleared, dug, and planted for spring. Bulbs, and some of the b...
-October - Third And Fourth Weeks. Flowers. Part 2
Crocuses Crocuses are pretty in colonies, and as they are very cheap there is encouragement to plant them in quantity. They look very nice in broad stretches in grass, particularly the Golden Yello...
-October - Third And Fourth Weeks. Flowers. Part 3
Hyacinths Hyacinths are beautiful bulbs, with a much greater range of brilliant colours than the Daffodil, and with an agreeable perfume, but it cannot be denied that they are somewhat lumpy, and w...
-October - Third And Fourth Weeks. Flowers. Part 4
The Lily Of The Valley The Lily Of The Valley is so generally considered as a forcing plant that comparatively few people grow it in the garden. It is hardy, and a British wilding. It loves a cool,...
-October - Third And Fourth Weeks. Flowers. Part 5
Tulips The richly-painted Tulip is a noble plant for the spring flower border, making grand breaks of colour. The May-bloomers are majestic plants, with thickets of luxuriant leaves, stems nearly a...
-October - Third And Fourth Weeks. Flowers. Part 6
Freesias Freesias are among the most delightful of bulbs on account of their delicious fragrance, and because they open their pretty flowers in winter; they have been dealt with pretty fully alread...
-October - Third And Fourth Weeks. Fruit
Gathering And Storing Fruit In view of the probability of sharp frost coming soon, it is desirable to gather any outdoor fruit that is still on the trees. Mid-season and late Apples like Blenheim, ...
-October - Third And Fourth Weeks. Vegetables
Broad Beans A row may be sown at the end of the month in rich, friable soil, the seed being covered three inches deep. Broccoli When the autumn is mild, Broccoli grows too late and too st...
-The Garden In October - A Resume
October is in part a month of clearing up for the past season, and in part of preparation for the following one. Chrysanthemums which are grown in pots have to be taken under cover for flowering. T...
-Chapter XI. Nov. Chrysanthemum Time
November is the month of months for the Chrysanthemum lover. It brings the crown of his year's work in the form of a lovely display of flowers in his conservatory, it brings the exhibitions, it brings...
-November - First And Second Weeks. Nov. 1-15. Flowers
Arum Lilies If beautiful white spathes are wanted at Christmas, the plants ought to have a minimum temperature of 550, and abundance of water. They will live in a low temperature, and retain their ...
-November - First And Second Weeks. Nov. 1-15. Flowers. Continued
Herbaceous Borders There are not likely to be many flowers, although in a mild autumn Stenactis speciosa, a few late Michaelmas Daisies, Chrysanthemums, and Dahlias may still be in beauty. As long ...
-Trees And Shrubs
November is a good month for planting nearly all kinds of trees and shrubs. The soil may be prepared in the same way as for Roses, and the standard trees staked thoroughly in order to keep them quite ...
-Trees And Shrubs. Continued
Greenhouses And Heating It is a November call on a friend who has a house of Chrysanthemums which has led many an amateur gardener to buy a glass-house. The sight of the beautiful flowers at a peri...
-November - First And Second Weeks. Fruit
The principal matter in connection with fruit in November is that of planting. All kinds of hardy fruits - Apples, Blackberries, Cherries, Currants, Damsons, Gooseberries, Pears, Plums, Raspberries, a...
-November - First And Second Weeks. Vegetables
Asparagus The decayed tops may now be removed, the bed cleared, and the soil dressed with wood-ashes or short manure. If any is to be forced, three or four year old roots ought to be chosen, and pa...
-November - Third And Fourth Weeks. Flowers
Azaleas And Camellias Plants grown under glass, whether in pots or planted out, often give trouble (and particularly Camellias) by casting their flower buds. The trouble is reduced by keeping them ...
-November - Third And Fourth Weeks. Fruit
Blackberries The fine garden forms are much superior to the common. They will grow against a rustic fence if the soil is deep and rich; but as they are often slow in starting, it is wise to cut the...
-November - Third And Fourth Weeks. Vegetables
Artichokes Globe Artichokes may now be shortened back, the soil forked up, and a mulching of manure given. Jerusalem Artichokes may be cut back also after the tops have matured, but the tubers may ...
-The Garden In November - A Resume
The month is important as witnessing the flowering and propagation of Chrysanthemums, and the planting of bulbs, fruit trees, Roses, and trees and shrubs. Arum Lilies, Bouvardias, and bulbs that ar...
-Chapter XII. Dec. The Christmas Garden
December is not dreary in the well-managed garden, but it is sometimes a month of marking time. There can be no dreariness when a ramble round the garden reveals many pleasant and interesting sights A...
-December - First And Second Weeks. Dec. 1-15. Flowers
Bulbs Early-flowering bulbs ought to be coming in now, and will be found charming for tables. If there is a warm greenhouse, the plants will grow rapidly and flower freely. Attention to watering wi...
-December - First And Second Weeks. Dec. 1-15. Flowers. Part 2
Chrysanthemums Now is a good time to order cuttings or young plants for next year's blooming. The following are good varieties: Japanese Chrysanthemums For Exhibition Brilliant, amaranth....
-December - First And Second Weeks. Dec. 1-15. Flowers. Part 3
Rhododendrons And Other Evergreen Shrubs Continue the planting of shrubs selected from the lists given in the preceding chapter. Rhododendrons, the most beautiful of the hardy shrubs, are generally...
-December - First And Second Weeks. Fruit
If whatever planting has to be done was not completed in November, it ought to be finished early in December, because prolonged bad weather may come at any time, and prevent the completion of the work...
-December - First And Second Weeks. Vegetables
Asparagus, Rhubarb, And Seakale Continue the forcing of these vegetables in accordance with previous instructions. Cauliflowers If there are any Cauliflowers still unused, it would be wel...
-December - Third And Fourth Weeks. Dec. 16-31. Flowers
Most of the work indicated for the first half of the month will be appropriate. Bulbs may be brought on. Lilies of the Valley may be forced. Roses, climbers generally, trees, and shrubs may be planted...
-December - Third And Fourth Weeks. Fruit
Big Bud On Black Currants If some of the buds on Black Currants become swollen into small balls, they contain a mite, which is very destructive, and often ruins the bushes. The swollen buds should ...
-The Garden In December - A Resume
There will be a few outdoor flowers in December if winter-blooming plants have been put in. In heated houses there will be a plentiful supply if previous advice has been followed. The planting of b...









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