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The Wild Garden | by W. Robinson



Or our Groves and Gardens made beautiful by the Naturalisation of Hardy Exotic Plants ; being one way onwards from the Dark Ages of Flower Gardening, with suggestions for the Regeneration of the Bare Borders of the London Parks.

TitleThe Wild Garden
AuthorW. Robinson
PublisherJohn Murray
Year1883
Copyright1883, John Murray
AmazonWilliam Robinson: The Wild Gardener
The WILD GARDENThe Wild Garden 2

By W. Robinson, F.L.S.

Third EDITION

Illustrated by Alfred Parsons

By the same Author.

The English Flower Garden : Its Style And Arrangement. Followed By An Alphabetical Description Of All The Plants Best Suited For Its Embellishment, Their Culture, And Position. With numerous Illustrations. Medium 8vo. 15s.

The Parks And Gardens Of Paris, considered in Relation to the Wants of other Cities and of Public and Private Gardens. Third Edition. With 350 Illustrations. 8vo. 18s.

Alpine Flowers For English Gardens. How They May Be Grown In All Parts Of The British Islands. With Illustrations of Rock-gardens, Natural and Artificial. Third Edition. With Woodcuts. Crown 8vo. 7s. 6d.

The Sub-Tropical Garden; or, Beauty of Form in the Flower Garden; with Illustrations of all the finer Plants used for this purpose. Second Edition. With Illustrations. Small 8vo. 5s.

Hardy Flowers. Descriptions of upwards of 1300 of the most Ornamental Species; with Directions for their Culture, etc. Fourth Edition. Post 8vo. 3s. 6d.

God's Acre Beautiful ; or, The Cemeteries of the Future. Third Edition. With Illustrations. 8vo. 7s. 6d.

-Preface
When I began, some years ago, to plead the cause of the innumerable hardy flowers against the few tender ones, put out at that time in a formal way, the answer frequently was, We cannot go back to t...
-One Way Onwards From The Dark Ages Of Flower-Gardening. Chapter I. Explanatory
Large-flowered Meadow Rue in the Wild Garden, type of plant mostly excluded from the Garden. About a generation ago a taste began to be manifested for placing a number of tender plants in the...
-One Way Onwards From The Dark Ages Of Flower-Gardening. Explanatory. Continued
By the means presently to be explained, numbers of plants of the highest order of beauty and fragrance, and clothed with pleasant associations, may be seen perfectly at home in the spaces now devoted ...
-Chapter II. Example From The Forget-Me-Not Family
Caucasian Comfrey in shrubbery. I will now endeavour to illustrate my meaning by showingwhat may be done with one type of northern vegetation - that of the Forget-me-not order, one far from b...
-Chapter III. Example From Hardy Bulbs And Tubers In Grass
We will now turn from the Forget-me-not order to a very different type of vegetation - hardy bulbs and other plants dying down after flowering early in the year, like the Winter Aconite and the Blood-...
-Chapter IV. Example From The Globe Flower Order
Let us next see what may be done with the Buttercup order of plants. It embraces many things widely diverse in aspect from these burnished ornaments of northern meadows and mountains. The first thing ...
-Example From The Globe Flower Order. Continued
Of the Globe Flowers (Trollius), there are various kinds apart from our own, all rich in colour, fragrant, and hardy in a remarkable degree. These are among the noblest wild-garden plants - quite hard...
-Chapter V. Plants Chiefly Fitted For The Wild Garden
The Giant Scabious (8 feet high). (Cephalaria procera.). What first suggested the idea of the wild garden, and even the name to me, was the desire to provide a home for a great number o...
-Chapter VI. Ditches And Narrow Shady Lanes, Copses, Hedgerows, And Thickets
Foliage of Dipsacus, on hedge-bank in spring. Men usually seek sunny positions for their gardens, so that even those obliged to be contented with the north side of the hill would scarcely app...
-Chapter VII. Drapery For Trees And Bushes
The numerous hardy climbers which we possess are very rarely seen to advantage, owing to their being; stiffly trained against walls. Indeed, the greater number of hardy climbers have gone out of...
-Chapter VIII. The Common Shrubbery, Woods And "Woodland Delves
It must not be thought that the wild garden can only be tunned in places where there is some extent of rough pleasure-ground. Excellent results may be obtained from the system in comparatively small g...
-The Common Shrubbery, Woods And "Woodland Delves. Part 2
Lilies coming up through carpet of White Arabis. There are great cultural advantages too, in leaving the whole of the leaves to nourish the ground and protect it from frost or heat. I append ...
-The Common Shrubbery, Woods And "Woodland Delves. Part 3
The- American White Wood-Lily Trillium grandiflerum) in Wild Garden, in wood bottom in leaf-mould. One day last spring, when strolling through the Medford wood, I came upon an open meadow wi...
-The Orchard Wild Garden
Although three years have elapsed since the illustrations of this book were commenced, I regret to issue it without a satisfactory one showing the beauty which may he obtained in the orchard from flow...
-Chapter IX. The Brook-Side, Water-Side, And Bog Gardens
Solomon's Seal and Herb Paris, in copse by streamlet. Nearly all landscape gardeners seem to have put a higher value on the lake or fishpond than on the brook as an ornament to the garden; bu...
-The Brook-Side, Water-Side, And Bog Gardens. Part 2
One of the prettiest effects I have ever observed was afforded by a sheet of Villarsia nymphaeoides belting round the margin of a lake near a woody recess, and before it, more towards the deep water, ...
-The Brook-Side, Water-Side, And Bog Gardens. Part 3
If with this water-garden we combine the wild garden of land plants - herbaceous, trailers, etc. - some of the loveliest effects possible in gardens will be produced. The margins of lakes and streams ...
-Chapter X. Roses Foe The Wild Garden, And For Hedgerows, Fences, And Groups
The wild Roses of the world, had we no other plants, would alone make beautiful wild gardens. The unequalled grace of the Wild Rose is as remarkable as the beauty of bloom for which the Rose is grown ...
-Chapter XI. Wild Gardening On Walls Or Ruins
There are many hundred species of mountain and rock plants which will thrive much better on an old wall, a ruin, a sunk fence, a sloping bank of stone, with earth behind, than they do in the most care...
-Chapter XII. Some Results
In addition to Longleat, and other cases previously mentioned, a few of the results obtained, where the system was tried, and so far as known to me, may not be without interest. How much a wild garden...
-Some Results. Part 2
To succeed with the wild garden, one should have a good collection of hardy flowers from which it can be supplied. Here one has been formed, consisting of about 1100 species, mostly arranged in border...
-Some Results. Part 3
In another part of the grounds there is a raised walk-quite away from trees, open and dry, with sloping banks on each side. This may be called a sun-walk, and here quite a different type of vegetation...
-The Wild Garden In America
Probably many of your readers will ask, What is a wild garden? When I came to London, about fifteen years ago, flower-gardening had hut one mode of expression only, viz. bedding out, and that i...
-Chapter XIII. A Plan For The Embellishment Of The Shrubbery Borders In London Parks
In the winter season, or indeed at any other season, one of the most melancholy things to be seen in our parks and gardens are the long, bare, naked shrubberies, extending, as along the Bays water Roa...
-A Plan For The Embellishment Of The Shrubbery Borders In London Parks. Continued
An essential thing is to abolish utterly the old dotting principle of the mixed border, as always ugly and always bad from a cultural point of view. Instead of sticking a number of things in one place...
-Chapter XIV. The Principal Types Of Hardy Exotic Flowering Plants For The Wild Garden
Wherever there is room, these plants should be at first grown in nursery beds to ensure a good supply. The number of nursery collections of hardy plants being now more numerous than they were a few ye...
-Bear's Breech, Acanthus
Vigorous perennials with noble foliage, mostly from Southern Europe. Long cast out of gardens, they are now beginning to receive more of the attention they deserve. In no position will they look bette...
-Monkshood, Aco-Nitum
These are tall, handsome perennials, with very poisonous roots, which make it dangerous to plant them in or near gardens. Being usually very vigorous in constitution, they spread freely, and hold thei...
-Bugle, Ajuga
Not a very numerous family so far as represented in gardens, but some of the species are valuable for the wild garden, notably Ajuga genevensis, which thrives freely in ordinary soils in open and half...
-Yarrow, Achillea
A numerous family of hardy plants spread through Northern Asia, Italy, Greece, Turkey, Hungary, etc., but more in Southern than in Central or Northern Europe. In the Alps and Pyrenees numerous species...
-Allium
A most extensive genus of plants scattered in abundance throughout the northern temperate and alpine regions of Europe and Asia, and also in America, Some of the species are very beautiful, so much so...
-Alstraemeria
All who care for hardy flowers must admire the beauty of Alstraemeria aurantiaca, especially when it spreads into bold healthy tufts, and when there is a great variety in the height of the flowering s...
-Marsh Mallow, Althaea
These are plants rarely seen out of botanic gardens now-a-days, and yet. from their vigour and showy flowers, they may afford unique effects in the wild garden. The common Hollyhock is an Althaea, and...
-Alyssum
In spring every little shoot of the wide tufts and flakes of these plants sends up a little fountain of small golden flowers. For bare, stony, or rocky banks, poor sandy ground, and ruins, they are ad...
-Windflower, Anemone
A numerous race of dwarf herbs that contribute largely to the most beautiful effects of the mountain, wood, and pasture vegetation of all northern and temperate climes. The flowers vary from intense s...
-St. Bruno's Lily, Anthericum
One of the must lovely aspects of vegetation in the alpine meadows of Europe is that afforded by the delicate white flowers of the St. Bruno's Lily in the Grass in early summer, looking like miniature...
-Alkanet, Anchusa
Tall and handsome herbaceous plants, with numerous flowers of a fine blue, admirable for dotting about in open places in sunny glades in woods or copses. They mostly come from Southern Europe and Wes...
-Snapdragon, Antirrhinum
The common Snapdragon and its beautifully spotted varieties are easily naturalised on old walls and ruins by sowing the seed in old or mossy chinks. Antirrhinum Asarinum, rupestre, and molle do well t...
-Columbine, Aquilegia
Favourite herbaceous plants, generally of various shades of blue ami purple, white, and sometimes bright orange. The varieties of the common kind (A. vulgaris), which are very numerous, are those most...
-Wall Cress, Arabis
Dwarf alpine plants, spreading in habit, and generally producing myriads of white flowers, exceedingly suitable for the decoration of sandy or rocky ground, where the vegetation is very dwarf. With th...
-Sandwort, Arenaria
A most important family of plants for the wild garden, though perhaps less so for lowland gardens where more vigorous types flourish. There are, however, certain species that are vigorous and indispen...
-Asphodel, Asphodel Us
The Asphodels are among the plants that have never been popular in the mixed border, nor are they likely to be so, tin-habit of the species being somewhat coarse and the flowering period not long, and...
-Lords And Ladies, Arum
Mostly a tropical and sub-tropical family, some of which grow as far north as southern Europe. These are quite hardy in our gardens. The Italian Arum is well worthy of a place in the wild garden, from...
-Silkweed, Asclepias
Usually vigorous perennials, with very curious and ornamental flowers, common in fields and on river banks in North America and Canada, where they sometimes become troublesome weeds. Of the species in...
-Starwort, Aster
A very large family of usually vigorous, often showy, and sometimes beautiful perennials, mostly with bluish or white flowers, chiefly natives of North America. Many of these, of an inferior order of ...
-Milk Vetch, Astragalus
An enormously numerous family of beautiful hardy plants, represented to but a very slight extent in our gardens, though hundreds of them are hardy, and many of them among the most pleasing of the many...
-Masterwort, Astrantia
This is an elegant genus, of which few species are known, five being European - found in Italy, Carinthia, Greece, and the centre of Europe - others from Northern Asia. They are among the few umbellat...
-Blue Rock Cress, Aubrietia
Dwarf Alpine plants, with purplish flowers, quite distinct in aspect and hue from anything else grown in our gardens, and never perishing from any cause, except being overrun by coarser subjects. They...
-Great Birth Wort, Aristolochia Sipho
A noble plant for covering arbours, banks, stumps of old trees, etc., also wigwam-like bowers, formed with branches of trees. It is American, and will grow as high as thirty feet, A. tomentosa is dist...
-Virginian Creepers, Ampelopsis
Although this chapter is mostly devoted to herbaceous plants, the Virginian Creeper and its allies are so useful for forming curtains in rocky places, ravines, or over old trees, that they deserve men...
-Bamboo, Bambusa
In many parts of England, Ireland, and Wales, various kinds of Bamboos are perfectly hardy, and not only hardy, but thrive freely. In cold, dry, and inland districts, it is true, they grow with diffic...
-Baptisia
A strong Lupin-like plant seldom grown in gardens, but beautiful when in bloom for its long blue racemes of pea flowers, growing three to four feet high ; it will hold its own in strong soil. ...
-Borage, Borago
A genus seldom seen out of Botanic gardens, where they form part of the usual distressing arrangements honoured with the name of scientific. Among the best kinds for our purpose are B. cretica and B...
-Bell-Flower, Campanula
Beautiful and generally blue-flowered herbs, varying from a few inches to 4 ft. in height, and abundantly scattered in northern and temperate countries. Many kinds are in cultivation. All the medium-s...
-Red Valerian, Centrantlms Ruber
This showy and pleasing plant is only seen in highest perfection on elevated banks, rubbish-heaps, or old walls, in which positions it endures much longer than on the level -round, and becomes a long-...
-Knap-Weed, Centaurea
Vigorous perennial or annual herbaceous plants, seldom so pretty as autumn-sown plants of our corn bluebottle (C. Cyanus). They are scarcely important enough for borders ; hence the wild wood is the p...
-Mouse-Ear, Cerastium
Dwarf spreading perennials, bearing a profusion of white flowers. Half a dozen or more of the kinds have silvery leaves, which, with their flowers, give them an attractive character. Most of these are...
-Wallflower, Cheiranthus
The varieties of the common wallflower afford quite a store of beauty in themselves for the embellishment of rocky places, old walls, etc. Probably other species of Cheiranthus will be found to grow o...
-Meadow Saffron, Colchicum
In addition to the meadow saffron, plentifully dotted over the moist fields in various parts of England, there are several other species winch could be readily naturalised in almost any soil and posit...
-Crocus
One or two Crocuses are naturalised in England already, and there is scarcely one of them that will not succeed thus if properly placed. They should not be placed where coarse vegetation would choke t...
-Virgin's Bower, Clematis
Mostly climbing or trailing plants, free, often luxuriant, sometimes rampant, in habit, with bluish, violet, purple, white, or yellow flowers, produced most profusely, and sometimes deliriously fragra...
-Dwarf Cornel, Cornus Canadensis
This charming little bushy plant, singularly beautiful from its white bracts, is a very attractive subject for naturalisation in moist, sandy, or peaty spots, in which our native heaths, Mitchella rep...
-Mocassin Flower, Cypripedium Spectabile
The noblest of hardy orchids, found far north in America, and thriving perfectly in England and Ireland in deep rich or vegetable soil. Wherever the soil is not naturally peat or rich vegetable matter...
-Sowbread, Cyclamen
It was the sight of a grove nearly covered with Cyclamen hedersefolium, near Montargis, in France, that first turned my attention to the Wild Garden. Both C. hederaefolium and C. europaeum may be n...
-The Giant Sea-Kale, Crambe
C. cordifolia is a very fine perennial, but its place is on the turf in rich soil. It has enormous leaves, and small whitish flowers in panicles. Here it is one of the finest ornaments in a wild gar...
-Bindweed, Calystegia
Climbing plants, with handsome white or rosy flowers, often too vigorous in constitution to be agreeable in gardens, as is the case with our common bindweed. C. dahurica, somewhat larger than the comm...
-Marsh Calla, Calla Palustris
A creeping Arum-like plant, with white flowers showing above a carpet of glossy leaves, admirable for naturalisation in muddy places, moist bogs, on the margins of ponds, etc. ...
-Rosy Coronilla, Coronilla Varia
Europe. On grassy banks, stony heaps, rough rocky ground, spreading over slopes or any like positions. A very fine plant for naturalisation, thriving in any soil. ...
-Giant Scabious, Cephalaria
Allied to Scabious but seldom grown. They are worth a place in the wild garden for their fine vigour alone, and the numerous pale yellow flowers will be admired by those who do not limit their admirat...
-Coral-Wort, Dentaria
Very showy perennials, the purplish or white flowers of which present somewhat of the appearance of a stock -Hower, quite distinct both in habit ami bloom, and very rarely seen in our gardens ; they w...
-Leopard's Bane, Doronicum
Stout, medium-sized, or dwarf perennials, with hardy and vigorous constitutions, and very showy flowers ; well suited for naturalisation among herbaceous vegetation, in any position where the beauty o...
-American Cowslip, Dodecatheon
All who care for hardy flowers admire the beautiful American cowslip (D. Meadia), found in rich woods in Pennsylvania, Ohio, to Wisconsin and south-westward, in America. This would be a charming plant...
-Fumitory, Fumaria, Dielytra
Plants with graceful leaves and gay flowers suited for association with dwarf subjects on open banks, except D. spectabilis, which in deep peat or other rich soil will grow a yard high. The simple-loo...
-Delphinium, Perennial Species
Tall and beautiful herbaceous plants, with flowers of many exquisite shades of blue and purple There are now numerous varieties. They are well suited for rich soil in glades, copses, thin shrubberies,...
-Pink, Dianthus
A numerous race of beautiful dwarf mountain plants, with flowers mostly of various shades of rose, sometimes sporting into other colours in cultivation. The finer mountain kinds would be likely to thr...
-Foxglove, Digitalis
It need not be said here that our own stately Foxglove should be encouraged in the wild garden, particularly in districts where it does not naturally grow wild ; I allude to it here to point out that ...
-Hemp Agrimony, Eupatorium
Vigorous perennials, with white or purple fringed flowers. Some of the American kinds might well be associated with our own wild one - the white kinds, like aromaticum and ageratoides, being very beau...
-Sea Holly, Eryngium
Very distinct and noble-looking perennials, with ornamental and usually spiny leaves, and flowers in heads, sometimes surrounded by a bluish involucrum, and supported on steins of a tine amethystine b...
-Heath, Erica, Menziesia
Our own heathy places are pretty rich in this type, but the brilliant Erica carnea is so distinct and attractive. that it well deserves naturalisation among them. The beautiful St. Daboec's heath (...
-Barren-Wort, Epimedium
Interesting and very distinct, but comparatively little known perennials, with pretty and usually delicately tinted flowers, and singular and ornamental foliage. They are most suitable for peaty or fr...
-Globe Thistle, Echinops
Large and distinct perennials of fine port, from 3 feet to 6 feet high, with spiny leaves and numerous flowers in spherical heads. These will thrive well in almost any position, and hold their ground ...
-Dog's-Tooth Violet, Erythronium
A few days ago I saw a number of irregular clumps of these here and there on a gently sloping bank of turf, and, in front of clumps of evergreens, they looked quite charming, and their dark spotted le...
-The Winter Aconite, Eranihis Hyemalis
Classed among British plants but really naturalised. Its golden buttons peeping through the moss and grass in snowdrop time form one of the prettiest aspects of our garden vegetation in spring. It wil...
-Funkia
I have spoken of the conditions in the wild garden being more suitable to many plants than those which obtain in what might seem choice positions in borders, many of the plants attaining greater beaut...
-Snakes-Head, Fritillaria
The beautiful British snakes-head (F. Meleagris) grows wild, as most people know, in meadows in various parts of England, and we should like to see it as well established in the grassy hollows of many...
-Giant Fennel, Ferula
Noble herbaceous plants belonging to the parsley order, with much and exquisitely divided leaves ; when well developed forming magnificent tufts of verdure, reminding one of the most finely-cut ferns,...
-Ferns
No plants may be naturalised more successfully and with a more charming effect than ferns. The royal ferns, of which the bold foliage is reflected in the marsh waters of Northern America, will do well...
-Geranium, Geranium. Erodium
Handsome and rather dwarf perennials, mostly with bluish, pinkish, or deep rose flowers, admirable for naturalisation. Some of the better kinds of the hardy geraniums, such as G. iberieum, are the ver...
-Gypsophila, Gyp-Sophila And Tunica
Vigorous but neat perennials, very hardy, and producing myriads of flowers, mostly small, and of a pale pinkish hue. They are best suited for rocky or sandy ground, or even old ruins, or any position ...
-Gentian, Gentiana
Dwarf, and usually evergreen, alpine or high-pasture plants, with large and numerous flowers, mostly handsome, and frequently of the most vivid and beautiful blue. The large G. acaulis (Gentianella) w...
-Snowdrops, Galanthus
The charms of our own Snowdrop when naturalised in the grass are well known to all, hut many of the new kinds have claims also in that respect, such as Elwesi and G. plicatus. It is surprising how com...
-Cow Parsnips, Heracleum
Giant herbaceous plants, mostly from Northern Asia, with huge divided leaves, and umbels (sometimes a foot across) of white or whitish flowers. They are very suitable for rough places on the hanks of ...
-Day Lily, Hemerocallis
Vigorous plants of the lily order, with long leaves and graceful habit, ami large and showy red-orange or yellow flowers, sometimes scented as delicately as the primrose. There are two types, one larg...
-Christmas Rose, Helleborus
Stout but dwarf perennials, with showy blooms appearing in winter and spring when flowers are rare, and with handsome leathery and glossy leaves. They thrive in almost any position or soil ; but to ge...
-Sun Rose, Helianthemum
Dwarf spreading shrubs, bearing myriads of flowers in a variety of showy colours. The most tasteful and satisfactory way of employing these in our gardens is to naturalise them on banks or slopes in t...
-Perennial Sunflower, Helianthus, Rudbeckia, Silphium
Stout and usually very tall perennials, with showy yellow flowers, the best known of which is Helianthus multiflorus fl. pl., of which plenty may be seen in Euston Square and other places in London. A...
-St. John's Wort, Hypericum
The well-known St. John's wort has already in many places made good its claim as a wilderness plant, and there is scarcely one of its numerous congeners which will not thrive in wild and rough places,...
-Rocket, Hesperis
The common single Rocket (Hesperis mat-ronalis) is a showy useful plant in copse or shrubbery, and very easily raised from seed. ...
-Evergreen Candytuft, Iberis
Compact little evergreens, forming spreading bushes from 3 inches to L5 inches high, and sheeted with white flowers in spring and early summer. There are no plants more suitable for naturalisation in ...
-Iris, Fleur De Lis
These plants, once so well known in our gardens. rivalling (or rather exceeding) the lilies in beauty, are varied and numerous enough to make a wild garden by themselves. The many beautiful varieties ...
-Common Lupine, Lupinus Polyphyllus
Amidst the tallest and handsomest herbaceous plants, grouped where they may be seen from grass drives or wood walks, or in any position or soil. Excellent for islets or river banks, in which, or in co...
-Honesty, Lunaria
This, which approaches the Stocks in the aspect of its fine purplish violet flowers, is quite removed from them by the appearance of its curious seed-vessels. It is one of the most valuable of all pla...
-Lily, Lilium
There are many hardy lilies that may be naturalised. The situations that these grow in, from the high meadows of Northern Italy, dotted with the orange lily, to the woody gorges of the Sierras in Cali...
-Snowflake, Leucojum
I have rarely seen anything more beautiful than a colony of the summer Snowflake on the margin of a tuft of rhododendrons in the gardens at Longleat. Some of the flowers were on stems nearly 3 feet hi...
-Gentian Lithosperm, Lithospermum Prostratum
A very dis-tinct, prostrate, hairy, half-shrubby plant, with a profusion of flowers of as fine a blue as any gentian. Thrives vigorously in any deep sandy soil, and in such well deserves naturalisatio...
-Lychnis
Handsome medium - sized perennials, with showy blooms, mostly of a brilliant rose or scarlet colour. If the type-was only represented by the rose campion it would be a valuable one. This is a beautifu...
-Honeysuckle, Lonicera
Such favourites as these must not be omitted. Any kind of climbing Honeysuckle will find a happy home in the wild garden, either rambling over stumps or hedgerows, or even planted by themselves on ban...
-Pea, Lathyrus
Much having been lately written concerning the wild garden and its suitable occupants, I venture to suggest Lathyrus pyrenaicus as an addition to the list. Most cultivators of flowers are aware of the...
-Monkey-Flower, Mimu-Lus
Wandering one day in the neighbourhood of Gruigfoot,a queer-shaped hill in Linlithgowshire, my eye was attracted by a small burn whose banks were literally jewelled throughout its visible course w...
-Grape Hyacinth, Muscari
These free and hardy little bulbs are easily naturalised and very handsome, with their little spikes of flowers of many shades of blue. Everlasting Pea, creeping up stem in shrubbery. ...
-Forget-Me-Not, Myosotics
There is one exotic species, M. dissi-tiflora, not inferior in beauty to any of our handsomest native kinds, and which is well worthy of naturalisation everywhere, thriving best on moist and sandy soi...
-Molopospernmm Cicutarium
There is a deep green and fern-like beauty displayed profusely by some of the Umbelliferous family, but I have rarely met with one so remarkably attractive as this species It is a very ornamental plan...
-Stock, Matthiola
Showy flowers, mostly fragrant, peculiarly well suited for old ruins, chalk pits, stony banks, etc. Some of the annual kinds are pretty, and some of the varieties common in gardens assume a bush-like ...
-Bee Balm, Monarda
Large and very showy herbaceous plants, with scarlet or purple flowers, conspicuously beautiful in American and Canadian woods, and capital subjects for naturalisation in woods, copses, etc., or anywh...
-Mallow, Malva, Althaea, Malope,Kitaibelia, Callirhoe, Sida
Plants of several distinct genera may be included under this type, and from each very showy and useful things may be obtained. They are for the most part subjects which are somewhat too coarse, when c...
-Mulgedium Plumieri
A herbaceous plant of fine and distinct port, bearing purplish-blue blossoms, rather uncommon among its kind. Till recently it was generally only seen in botanic gardens, but it has, nevertheless, man...
-Water Lily, Nymphaea And Nuphar
Two noble Ninth American plants well deserve naturalisation in our waters, associated with our own beautiful white and yellow water lilies - the large Nuphar advena, which thrusts its great leaves wel...
-Daffodil, Narcissus
Most people have seen the common daffodil in a semi-wild state in our woods and copses. Apart from varieties, there are more than a score distinct species of daffodil that could be naturalised quite a...
-Bitter Vetch, Orobus
Banks, grassy unmown margins of wood-walks, rocks, fringes of shrubberies, and like places, with deep and sandy loam, well drained, will grow the beautiful spring Bitter Vetch or any of its varieties ...
-Evening Primrose, Enotliera
Among the largest-flowered and handsomest of all known types of herbaceous vegetation. The yellow species, and varieties like and allied to the common Evening Primrose (CE. biennis), may be readily na...
-Cotton Thistle, Onopordon
Large thistles, with very handsome hoary and silvery leaves, and purplish flowers on fiercely-armed stems. No plants are more noble in port than these, and they thrive freely in rough open places, rub...
-Star Of Bethlehem, Ornithogalum
Various handsome hardy species of this genus will thrive as well as the common Star of Bethlehem in any sunny, grassy places. ...
-Creeping Forget-Me-Not, Omphalodes
The creeping Forgetme-not,Omphalodes verna, is one of the prettiest plants to be naturalised in woods, copses, or shrubberies, running about with the greatest freedom in moist soil. It is more compact...
-Wood Sorrel, Oxalis
Dwarf plants with clover-like leaflets and pretty rosy or yellow flowers. At least two of the species in cultivation, viz. O. Bowieana and O. floribunda, might be naturalised on sandy soils amidst veg...
-Paeony
Vigorous herbaceous plants, with Large and splendid flowers of various shades of crimson, rosy-crimson, and white, well calculated for producing the finest effects in the wild garden. There are many s...
-Poppy, Papaver, In Var
The huge and flaming Papaver orientale, P. bracteatum, and P. lateritium, are the most important of this type. They will thrive and live long in almost any position, but the proper place for them is i...
-Phlomis
Showy and stately herbaceous or half-shrubby plants, with a profusion of handsome yellow or purplish flowers. Excellent for naturalisation in warm open woods, copses, banks, etc., growing well in ordi...
-Virginian Poke, Phytolacca Decan-Dra
A tall, robust perennial, within conspicuous flowers and long dense spikes of purplish berries. It will grow anywhere and in any soil ; but is most imposing in rich deep ones. The berries are relished...
-Physostegia
Tall, erect, and beautiful herbaceous plants, mostly with deli-rate rosy flowers ; natives of North America, thriving in any soil. They arc among the most pleasing things for planting in half-wild pla...
-Lungwort, Pulmonaria
Dwarf plants of the borage family, with showy blue or pinkish blossoms. Easily naturalised in woods or copses, in which position the common blue one must be familiar to many in the woods of England an...
-The Tall Ox-Eye Daisy, Pyrethrum Serotinum
This fine autumn flowering plant, for years left in the almost ex-elusive possession of the Botanic Gardens, is one of the handsomest things we have. It grows 5 or 6 feet high, and flowers late in the...
-Bramble, Rubus
Although we have nearly fifty kinds or reputed kinds of bramble native in Britain, some of the exotic species, entirely distinct from our own, are well worthy of naturalisation among low shrubs and ta...
-The Great Reed; Arundo Donax
This noble reed I do not like to omit here, it is so beautiful in the southern counties of England, though in cold soils and hard winters it may perish. Where the hardier Bamboos find a place this wil...
-Rhubarb, Rheum
There are several species of rhubarb in cultivation in addition to those commonly grown in gardens. They are much alike in port and in the size of their leaves, R. palmatum and Emodi being the most di...
-Rose, Rosa
As in the case of brambles, we have many more kinds of wild roses in England than is commonly supposed, but of course nobody ever thinks of planting such things in gardens or shrubberies, where such g...
-Sea Lavender, Statice
Vigorous perennials, with a profusion of bluish lavender-coloured bloom, thriving freely on all ordinary garden soils. S. latifolia, and some of the stronger kinds, thrive in any position among the me...
-Spiraea, Spircea
Handsome and usually vigorous herbaceous plants, with white or rosy flowers, and generally ornamental foliage. Such beautiful kinds as venusta and palniata it is most desirable to try in wild places a...
-Golden Rod, Solidago
Tall and vigorous perennials with yellow flowers, showy when in bloom, and attractive when seen in America in autumn, mingled with the blue and lilac Asters of that country, but rarely ornamental as g...
-Catch-Fly, Silene
Dwarf or spreading plants, allied to the pinks, and generally with white or rosy flowers. The choice mountain kinds, such as S. Lagascae, alpestris, Schafta, etc., are among the most charming subjects...
-Bloodwort, Sanguinaria Canadensis
This little plant, which abounds in the woods of Canada and North America, and which is very rarely indeed seen well grown in our gardens, will thrive under the branches of deciduous trees as well as ...
-Squill, Scilla
Several kinds of Scilla, closely allied to the common bluebell, would do quite as well in our woods as that well-known native plant, notably S. campanulata, S. bifolia, S. sibirica, etc. Bifolia and s...
-Comfrey, Symphytum
Herbaceous plants of the borage order, usually vigorous, and with handsome blue flowers. One of the handsomest spring flowers is Symphytum caucasicum, and it is also one of the easiest things to natur...
-Scabious, Scabiosa, Cephalaria, Knautia
Sometimes handsome and usually free-growing herbaceous plants, bluish, purplish, or yellowish in tone. Among these may be seen, in botanic and other gardens, plants suited for naturalisation, hut scar...
-Stonecrop, Sedum
Minute and usually prostrate plants, mostly with white, yellow, or rosy flowers, and occurring in multitudes on most of the mountain chains of northern and temperate countries. There are few of these ...
-Saxifrage, Saxifraga
A very extensive genus of plants, abundantly distributed on mountains in northern countries. For our present purpose they may be broadly thrown into five sections - the mossy section, represented in B...
-Houseleek, Sempervivum
Very dwarf and succulent plants, with their fleshy leaves arranged in dense rosettes, and mostly with curious but seldom conspicuous flowers, abounding in mountainous regions, and very hardy. The grea...
-Meadow Rue, Thalictrum
Tall and vigorous herbaceous plants, mostly without any beauty of flower when closely examined, but often affording a pleasing distant effect when seen in masses, and hence desirable for this mode of ...
-Spiderwort, Tradescantia Virginica
A handsome and distinct North American perennial, with purple, blue, or white flowers, attain-in-' a height of 1 1/2 feet or 2 feet. An admirable subject for naturalisation on almost any soil, thrivin...
-Wood Lily. Trillium
Very singular and beautiful American wood plants, of which T. grandifloruni is worthy of special attention, thriving in shady places in moist rich soils, in woods and copses, where some vegetable soil...
-Globe Flower, Trollius
Beautiful plants of vigorous habit, with large handsome flowers, of a fine golden colour, like those of the buttercups, but turning inwards so as to form an almost round blossom, quite distinct in asp...
-Tulip, Tulipa
Various kinds of Tulips might he naturalised with advantage by wood walks and in the rougher parts of the pleasure grounds. In such positions they would not attain such a size as the richly-fed garden...
-Telekia, Telehia Cordifolia
A vigorous herbaceous plant, suited for association with Echinops, Rheum, and subjects grown for their foliage and character. It is very free in growth, and has large foliage and sunflower-like flower...
-Flame Flower, Tritoma
Flame Flowers are occasionally planted in excess, so as to neutralise the good effect they might otherwise produce, and they, like many other flowers, have suffered from being, like soldiers, put in s...
-Showy Indian Cress, Tropaedlum Speciosum
Against terrace walls, among shrubs, and on slopes, on banks, or bushy rockwork near the hardy fernery ; in deep, rich, and light soil. This is a brilliant plant, well worth any trouble to establish. ...
-Mullein, Verbascum
Verhascum vernale is a noble plant, which has been slowly spreading in our collections of hardy plants fur some years past, and it is a plant of peculiar merit, I first saw it in the Garden of Plants,...
-Periwinkle, Vinca
Trailing plants, with glossy foliage and handsome blue flowers, well known in gardens. They are admirable plants for naturalisation, growing in any position, shady or sunny. A tall Mullein. ...
-Speedwell, Veronica
- Herbaceous plants, usually rather tall (11/2 feet to 3 feet), in some cases dwarf and neat alpine plants with blue flowers in various shades ; are among the hardiest of plants, and will grow in any ...
-Violet, Viola
A numerous race of dwarf and interesting plants, thriving freely in our climate, in half-shady places, rocky spots or banks, fringes of shrubberies, or almost any position. The very handsome bird's-fo...
-Adam's-Needle, Yucca
Although these scarcely come into this selection, yet their fine habit and their hardiness give them a charm for us even in a wild garden. A legitimate aim, on the part of any one carrying out this to...
-Chapter XV. Selections Of Hardy Exotic Plants For Various Positions In The Wild Garden
As it is desirable to know how to procure as well as how to select the best kinds, a few words on the first subject may not be amiss here. A very important point is the getting of a stock of plants...
-Plants Of Vigorous Habit For The Wild Garden
Trollius altaicus. napellifolius, or any other kind. Thalietrum aquilegifolium. Delphinium, in var. Aconitum, in var. Pseonia, in great var. Papaver orientale. ,, bracteatum. Macleya ...
-Hardy Plants With Fine Foliage Or Graceful Habit Suitable For Naturalisation
Acanthus, several species. Asclepias syriaca. Statice latifolia. Polygonum cuspidatum. ,, sachalinense. Rheum Emodi, and other kinds. Euphorbia Cyparissias. Datisca cannabina. Veratrum album. Cramb...
-Plants For Hedge-Banks And Like Places
Clematis in great var. Thalictrumaquilegifolium. Anemone japoniea and vars. Delphinium, in var. Aconitum, in var. Macleaya cordata. Kitaibelia vitifolia. Tropaeolum speciosum. Baptisia australis. ...
-Trailers, Climbers, etc
The selection of plants to cover bowers, trellises, railings, old trees, stumps, rootwork, etc, suitably, is important, particularly as the plants fitted for these purposes are equally useful for roug...
-Spring and early Summer Flowers for Naturalisation
Anemone alpina. sulphurea. ,, apennina. blanda. ,, Coronaria. fulgens. Hepatica. ,, ranunculoides. ,, trifolia. Ranunculus aconitifolius. ,, amplexicaulis...
-Plants For Naturalisation Beneath Specimen Trees On Lawns, Etc
Where, as is frequently the case, the branches of trees, both evergreen and deciduous, sweep the turf - and this, as a rule, they should be allowed to do where they are planted in ornamental grounds -...
-Plants For, Very Moist Rich Soils
Althaea, in var. Astilbe rivularis. Aralia edulis. nudicaulis. Artemisia, in var. Asclepias Cornuti. Asphodelus ramosus. Aster, in var. Baptisia exaltata. Butomus unibellatus. Calla palustr...
-Plants Suited For Calcareous Or Chalky Soil
Adenophora, in var. AEthionenia, in var. Anemone, in var. Alyssum, in var. Anthyllis montana. Antirrhinum, in var. Cistus, in var. Cheiranthus, in var. Campanula, in var. Carduus eriophorus. Cerast...
-Selection Of Plants For Growing On Old Walls, Ruins, Or Pocky Slopes
Achillea tomentosa. Alyssum montanum saxatile (walls and ruins). Antirrhinum rupestre. majus. ,, Orontium. Arenaria balearica. crespitosa. ,, ciliata. graminifolia. ,, mo...
-Hardy Bulbs For Naturalisation
Allium Moly. ,, fragrans. ,, neapolitanum. ,, ciliatum. Brodiaea congesta. Bulbocodium venrum. Camassia esculenta. Crinum capense. Crocus, in great var. Colchicum, in var. Cyclamen, in var...
-Climbing And Twining Plants For Thickets, Copses, Hedgerows, And Trees
Ampelopsis bipinnata. ,, cordata. ,, hederacea. ,, tricuspidata. Apios tuberosa. Aristolochia Sipho. tomentosa. Asparagus Broussoneti. Calystegia dahurica. Cissus orientalis....
-Rabbits And Woods
This sad subject has been kept for the last, as the only disagreeable one in connection with the wild garden. All I have to say of it is, there should be no rabbits in the wild garden ; but the follow...









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