There are several ways of propagating Vines, but the commonest is to prepare and insert small portions of shoots, each with a bud, technically termed eyes. It is winter work, propagators considering that there is no better time than the period just before the buds show signs of swelling, or at the very earliest stage of moving. I was taught how to raise Vines by the hundred in a very small space by the following simple plan: Take a number of clean 6 or 8 inch pots, fill them one-third full of crocks, put on these some decayed turf pulled to pieces, fill up to the level of the rim with moist soil, make it concave, press it firm, scatter on some sand, and insert the eyes 1 inch apart all over the surface, surrounding them with sand, and leaving the bud level with the top of the soil, not buried. Plunge in a tan bed or propagating box, in order to secure a bottom heat of 70° to 80°. Under this treatment the eyes quickly start growth, form roots freely, and force the bud into a shoot.

Fig. 66. A Cane Nine Months After The Eye Was Inserted
Fig. 66. A Cane Nine Months After The Eye Was Inserted

A, cane nine months after the eye was inserted: a, point of cutting back in winter to get a strong fruiting cane; b, small side shoots.