There is nothing more interesting in the whole range of gardening operations, bristling though it is with fascinating features, than the development of a young Vine. Like the "Popular Educator" juvenile whom we see on the posters, it may develop into vigorous youth, robust manhood, and honoured age; or reach maturity and decrepitude by various stages of vice and idleness. If the general culture be right, of which more anon, the shoot from the bud previously referred to will grow rapidly, and by the end of the season, perhaps before, it will have reached the top of the house. It will not, however, be either a thick shoot or a ripe one - it is impossible that it should be; but we want it to be both, and to secure this end we shorten it to about one-third the length of the rafters. This shortening is usually done in autumn or winter, but some growers pinch out the tip while it is growing. Any side shoots which push are shortened to one or two buds. The next year the rod will thicken considerably. The leading shoot will reach the top of the house, and may again be shortened, this time to two-thirds the length of the rafters. The second shortening is sometimes omitted, and nothing very terrible happens; but it helps the rod to thicken, and I consider it to be advisable. (See Figs. 69, 70, and 71.)

Fig. 69, 70, 71. Pruning Young Vines After Planting
Fig. 69, 70, 71. Pruning Young Vines After Planting

The bars show, Fig. 69, where to prune the first season; Fig. 70, where to prune the second season; Fig, 71, where to prune the third season.