The task of forming a good fruiting Vine has not ended with the planting; in fact, to those who buy their plants it is only commencing. To begin with, it is true wisdom to shorten the cane hard, or, what is equivalent, to rub off the buds first and shorten afterwards. Let me make sure that writer and reader follow each other in this matter, for it is very important. A Vine must not be left its full length after planting, or it will break strongly at the top, remain poorly developed at the bottom, and never make a good fruiter. It must be shortened, and it is easy to decide how much. If the Vine is planted in an outside border, remove a brick or two from the wall, pass the cane through, and train it under the roof. If planted inside the house, train it against the front wall and under the roof. At the point where a part of it bearing a good bud comes under full exposure to light through reaching the glass (the latter being either a portion of the front wall or the roof itself) pass a knife through the cane, and a new growth - the future bearing rod - will start from the bud. The slight modification previously hinted at is advisable if planting is done in spring instead of winter; in this case rub off all the buds below the one exposed to the light, and do not cut off the upper part until the shoot which broke from the bud is in free growth, and is therefore a good channel for the sap. The reason of this is that if a late planted Vine is cut back to a bud that is practically dormant "bleeding," or loss of sap, is liable to take place to such an extent as to weaken the Vine.

There is no benefit in planting Vines deeply. The upper layer of soil may be finer than the lower, and if there is 8 or 9 inches in depth of it there will be sufficient to work amongst and cover the roots. Press it firmly. To be strictly correct, the border should be made six or eight weeks before planting, in order to allow it time to settle: this will save a great deal of ramming. Plant not less than 3 feet apart, 4 feet is better.

Fig. 68. Showing How A Vine May Be Planted Either Inside Or Outside
Fig. 68. Showing How A Vine May Be Planted Either Inside Or Outside

A, Vine: a, border; b, point of first pruning; c, growth subsequently made; d, point of second pruning.

Section of house: f, front wall; g, hole made in front wall to admit cane; i, front glass; j, trellis; k, lowest wire of trellis.