The trees of this group are usually broad and spreading in habit, but in a few cases, e.g., Amini, they may be rather tall, with an oval crown. The foliage is abundant, bright to deep green in color, the leaves medium to large in size, with primary transverse veins 20 to 24 pairs, fairly conspicuous. The panicle is large, very broad toward the base, stiff, sometimes stout, 10 to 18 inches long, the axis and laterals pale green to dull rose-pink in color, glabrate to very finely and sparsely pubescent. The flowers are not crowded on the panicle. The staminodes are poorly developed, rarely capitate. Most varieties of this group are not heavy bearers. Flowers are often produced sparingly, or on only one side of the tree, but a much higher percentage of flowers develops into fruits than in the Mulgoba group. Under average conditions, most of the varieties bear small to fair crops. The fruit is longer than broad, usually oblique at the base, and lacks a beak. The stigmatic point or nak often forms a prominence on the ventral surface above the apex. The color varies from yellowish green to bright yellow blushed scarlet. The flesh is orange colored, free from fiber, and is characterized by rich luscious flavor, in some varieties nearly as good as that of Mulgoba. On an average, the quality of fruit is better than in any other group. The seed contains but one embryo.

Amini (Fig. 17). - Form oval, laterally compressed; size small to below medium, weight 6 to 8 ounces, length 3 to 3 1/4 inches, breadth 2 1/2 to 2 3/4 inches, base obliquely flattened, cavity none; apex rounded, the nak conspicuous and 5/16 inch above the end of the fruit; surface smooth, deep yellow in color overspread with dull scarlet particularly around the base, dots numerous, small, pale yellow; skin thick and firm; flesh bright orange-yellow in color, melting, very juicy, strongly aromatic, free from fiber, and of sweet unusually spicy flavor; quality excellent; seed oblong-oval, very thin, with only a few short fibers on the ventral edge. Season in Florida June and July.

Introduced into the United States in 1901 by the United States Department of Agriculture (S. P. I. No. 7104) from Bangalore, India. One of the most satisfactory Indian varieties tested in Florida and the West Indies. It is more regular in bearing than many others, and the aroma and flavor of the fruit are excellent. Not to be confused with Amiri, which has sometimes been sold under the name Long Amini. Amin (Sanskrit) means a tall, pyramidal mango tree; amin (Arabic) means constant, faithful. Bennett (Fig. 18). - Form ovate-oblique to ovate-cordate, very plump; size below medium to medium, weight 7 to 12 ounces, length 3 to 3 1/4 inches, breadth 2 3/4 to 3 3/4 inches, base obliquely flattened, cavity almost none; apex broadly pointed, the nak level or slightly depressed, about 3/4 inch above end of fruit; surface smooth, yellow-green to yellow-orange, dots few, light yellow; skin thick and tough, not easily broken; flesh deep orange, free from fiber, firm and meaty, moderately juicy, of pleasant aroma and sweet, rich, piquant flavor; quality excellent; seed oblong-reniform, thick, with short stiff fibers over the entire surface. Season in south Florida late July and August. Introduced into the United States in 1902 by the United States Department of Agriculture (S. P. I. 8419 and 8727) from Goregon, near Bombay, India. Syn. Douglas Bennett's Alphonse. This is one of the esteemed Alphonse mangos of western India. Some of the fruits produced in Florida have been characterized by hard sour lumps in the flesh, hence the variety has not made such a favorable impression as would otherwise have been the case. The tree is vigorous, and bears more regularly than Mulgoba. The Alphonse mangos are supposed to have been named for Affonso (Alphonse) d'Albuquerque, one of the early governors of the Portuguese possessions in India. The name has been corrupted to Apoos, Afoos, Hafu.

Fig. 17. Amini mango. (X about 1/2)

Fig. 17. Amini mango. (X about 1/2)

Fig. 18.. The Bennett mango. (X 2/5)

Fig. 18.. The Bennett mango. (X 2/5)

Pairi (Fig. 19). - Form ovate-reniform to ovate-oblique, prominently beaked; size below medium to medium, weight 7 to 10 ounces, length 3 to 3 1/2 inches, breadth 2 7/8 to 3 1/4 inches ; base obliquely flattened, cavity none; apex rounded to broadly pointed, with a conspicuous beak slightly above it on the ventral side of the fruit; surface smooth to undulating, yellow-green in color, suffused scarlet around the base, the dots few, small, whitish yellow; skin moderately thick ; flesh bright yellow-orange in color, firm but juicy, of fine texture, free from fiber, of pronounced and pleasant aroma and sweet, rich, spicy flavor; quality excellent; seed thick, with short bristly fibers over the entire surface. Season in south Florida July and August. Introduced into the United States in 1902 from Bombay, India, by the United States Department of Agriculture (S. P. I. 8730); a variety (S. P. I. 29510) introduced under the same name in 1911 from Poona, India, has proved to be slightly different. Syns. Paheri, Pirie, Pyrie. Ranks second only to Alphonse in the markets of Bombay, India. William Burns says, "Personally I prefer the slightly acid Pairi to the heavier and more luscious Alphonse." Two subvarieties are known in India, Moti Pairi and Kagdi Pairi. The tree is a good grower, and resembles Bennett in productiveness, although it sometimes fruits more heavily. The word Pairi is probably a corruption of the Portuguese proper name Pereira.

Rajpuri. - Form roundish ovate to ovate-reniform, beaked; size below medium to medium, weight 8 to 12 ounces, length 3 1/4 to 3 3/4 inches, breadth 3 to 3 1/2 inches; base flattened, scarcely oblique, cavity none; apex bluntly pointed, with the prominent nak to one side; surface smooth, green-yellow to yellow in color, over-spread with scarlet on exposed side and around base; dots small, numerous, whitish; skin moderately thick; flesh deep yellow in color, free from fiber, juicy, with pronounced aroma and rich piquant flavor; quality excellent; seed oblong-elliptic, thick, with short stiff fibers over the surface. Season July and August in Florida.

Fig. 19. The Pairi mango. (X 2/5)

Fig. 19. The Pairi mango. (X 2/5)

Introduced into the United States in 1901 from Bangalore, India, by the United States Department of Agriculture (S. P. I. 7105). Syns. Rajpury, Rajapuri, Rajabury, and Rajapurri. A fruit of fine quality, with aroma and flavor distinct from that of other mangos. Its fruiting habits have proved fairly good. Rajpur, name of a town in India (perhaps Rajapur?).