In this group the tree is erect, with the crown usually oval, never broadly spreading, and densely umbrageous. The foliage is abundant, deep green in color, the leaves medium sized to rather large, with primary transverse veins more numerous than in other groups, commonly 26 to 30 pairs, quite conspicuous. The odor of the crushed leaves is distinctive. The panicle is very large, loose, slender, 12 to 20 inches in length, and laterals pale green to dull magenta-pink, very finely pubescent. The staminodes are poorly developed, rarely capitate or fertile. The varieties of this group usually bloom profusely; those from Indo-China are productive, while the Philippine seedlings in Florida sometimes bear excellent crops and in other seasons drop all their flowers. Three to five fruits, or even more, may develop on one panicle. In form the fruits are always long, strongly compressed laterally, and usually sharply pointed at the apex, lemon-yellow to deep yellow in color, with bright yellow flesh almost free from fiber and of characteristic sprightly subacid flavor, lacking the richness of some of the Indian mangos. The seed is oblong, normally polyembryonic.

Fig. 20. The Sandersha mango. The fruit is not so richly flavored as that of Mulgoba or Pairi, but is excellent for cooking. (X 1/3)

Fig. 20. The Sandersha mango. The fruit is not so richly flavored as that of Mulgoba or Pairi, but is excellent for cooking. (X 1/3)

Cambodiana (Fig. 21). -Form oblong to oblong-ovate, compressed laterally; size below medium to medium, weight 8 to 10 ounces, length 3 3/4 to 4 1/2 inches, breadth 2 1/2 to 2 3/4 inches; base rounded, the stem inserted squarely or slightly to one side without depression; apex pointed, the nak a small point 1/2 inch above the longitudinal apex; surface smooth, yellow-green to deep yellow in color, dots almost wanting; skin very thin and tender; flesh deep yellow in color, very juicy, free from fiber, and of mild, subacid, slightly aromatic flavor; quality good; seed elliptic-oblong, thick, with short fiber on ventral edge. Season in Florida late June to early August.

Originated at Miami, Florida, from a seed introduced in 1902 from Saigon, Cochin China, by the United States Department of Agriculture (S. P. I. 8701). A later importation of seeds from the same region (S. P. I. 11645) has given rise to another variety propagated by budding which differs slightly from the one here described. The tree bears more regularly than most of the Indian varieties. Named for Cambodia, a region of French Indo-China.

Fig. 21. The Cambodiana mango. (X 1/3)

Fig. 21. The Cambodiana mango. (X 1/3)