In this group the tree is usually erect, with a broad, dense crown. The leaves are slender, smaller (especially in the variety Mulgoba) than in some of the other groups, the primary transverse veins 22 to 24 pairs, moderately conspicuous. The panicle is usually slender, frequently drooping, 12 to 18 inches in length, the axis and laterals varying from pale green tinged pink to rose pink, the pubescence heavier than in most other groups. The flowers are usually very abundant on the panicle. The staminodes are strongly developed, often capitate, one or two sometimes fertile. In general, varieties of this group require the stimulus of dry weather to make them flower profusely, and they show a decided tendency to drop most of their fruits. Haden, however, holds its fruits well. The fruit is usually oval. It varies in color from dull green to yellow blushed red, and lacks a distinct beak. The flesh is deep yellow to orange-yellow, variable in quality. The seed is normally monoembryonic.

Mulgoba (Fig. 15). - Form oblong ovate to ovate, laterally compressed ; size medium to above medium, weight 9 1/2 to 14 1/2 ounces, length 3 1/2 to 4 1/2 inches, breadth 3 to 3 1/2 inches, base flattened, with the stem inserted obliquely in a very shallow cavity; apex rounded to broadly pointed, the nak a small point on the ventral surface about 1/2 inch above the longitudinal apex; surface slightly undulating, deep to apricot-yellow in color, sometimes overspread with scarlet around base and on exposed side, dots few to numerous, small, lighter in color than surface; skin thick, tough, tenacious, flesh bright orange-yellow, smooth and fine in texture, with a pronounced and very agreeable aroma, very juicy, free from fiber, and of rich piquant flavor; quality excellent; seed oblong to oblong-reniform, plump, with sparse, stiff, short fibers \ inch long over the surface. Season in Florida July to September.

Introduced into the United States in 1889 from Poona, India, by the United States Department of Agriculture. This was the first grafted Indian variety to fruit in the United States. In attractive coloring, delicate aromatic flavor, and freedom from fiber, Mulgoba is scarcely excelled, but it has proved irregular in its fruiting habits and for this reason cannot be recommended for commercial planting expect in regions with dry climates. The tree does not come into bearing at an early age. The name Mulgoba (properly Malghoba) is taken from that of a native Indian dish, and means "makes the mouth water."

Haden (Fig. 16). - Form oval to ovate, plump; size large to very large, weight 15 to 20 ounces, sometimes up to 24 ounces, length 4 to 5 1/2 inches, breadth 3 1/2 to 4 1/2 inches, base rounded, the stem inserted almost squarely without depression; apex rounded to broadly pointed, the nak depressed, 3/4 inch above the longitudinal apex; surface smooth, light to deep apricot-yellow in color, overspread with crimson-scarlet, dots numerous, large whitish yellow in color, skin very thick and tough; flesh yellowish orange in color, firm, very juicy, fibrous only close to the seed, and of sweet, rich, moderately piquant flavor; quality good; seed oblong, plump, with considerable fiber along the ventral edge and a few short stiff bristles elsewhere. Season in Florida July and August. Originated at Coconut Grove, Florida, as a seedling of Mulgoba. First propagated in 1910. The fruit is not so fine as that of Mulgoba, but the tree is a stronger grower, comes into fruit at an early age, and bears more regularly.

Fig. 15. The Mulgoba mango. (X 2/5)

Fig. 15. The Mulgoba mango. (X 2/5)

Fig. 16. The Haden mango. (X 1/3)

Fig. 16. The Haden mango. (X 1/3)