The tree is erect, stiff, with the crown less broad than in the Mulgoba group and usually not so umbrageous. The foliage is fairly abundant, deep green in color, the leaves comparatively small but broad, with primary transverse veins 18 to 24 pairs, moderately conspicuous. The panicle is small to large, broad toward the base, 8 to 18 inches long, stiff, the axis and laterals deep magenta-pink to bright maroon, the pubescence very minute and inconspicuous. The flowers are abundant but not closely crowded on the panicle. The stami-nodes are weakly developed, rarely capitate or fertile. Varieties of this group often flower in unfavorable weather, and they remain in bloom during a long period. On the whole, the group is characterized by a higher degree of productiveness than any other class of Indian mangos yet grown in the United States. The fruit is long, usually tapering to both base and apex and terminating in a prominent beak at the apex, large in size, deep yellow in color, the flesh orange-yellow, and free from fiber. The somewhat acid flavor makes the mangos of this group more valuable as culinary than as dessert fruits. The seed is long, containing normally one embryo, the cotyledons often not filling the endocarp completely.

Sandersha (Fig. 20). - Form oblong, tapering toward stem and prominently beaked at the apex; size large to extremely large, weight 18 to 32 ounces, length 6 1/2 to 8 inches, breadth 3 3/4 to 4 1/4 inches; base slender, extended; apex broadly pointed, with the nak forming a prominent beak to the ventral side; surface smooth, yellow to golden yellow in color, sometimes blushed scarlet on exposed side, dots numerous, small, yellow-gray; flesh orange-yellow in color, meaty, moderately juicy, free from fiber, and of subacid, slightly aromatic flavor; dessert quality fair, culinary quality excellent; seed long, slender, slightly curved, with fiber only along the ventral edge. Season in south Florida August and September.

Introduced into the United States in 1901 from Bangalore, India, by the United States Department of Agriculture (S. P. I. 7108). Syns. Soondershaw, Sandershaw, Sundersha. A variety introduced from Saharanpur, India, under the name Sundershah (S. P. I. 10665) is probably distinct. The tree has remarkably good fruiting habits. Etymology of name unknown.

Totapari. - Form oval to ob-long-reniform, beaked; size medium, weight 10 to 12 ounces, length 4 1/5 to 5 inches, breadth 3 to 3 1/2 inches; base rounded, the stem inserted squarely; apex broadly pointed, with the nak forming a prominent beak to the ventral side; surface smooth, greenish yellow in color, overspread with scarlet on exposed side; skin moderately thick and tough; flesh bright yellow in color, unusually juicy, free from fiber, moderately aromatic, and of subacid, moderately rich flavor; dessert quality fair, culinary quality good; seed oblong, rather thin, with small amount of fiber on edges. Season in south Florida August and September.

Introduced into the United States in 1902 from Bombay, India, by the United States Department of Agriculture (S. P. I. 8732). Syn. Totafari. The tree does not bear as well as Sandersha, nor is the fruit quite as good. The name means "parrot's beak."