Seedling trees may begin to bear fruit when seven or eight years old, but it is rare for them to do so before the ninth year. It is not yet known how many years will be required for an inarched or budded tree to come into bearing. In Ceylon the trees are said to bloom twice a year, once in August and again in January. The fruit from the first crop of flowers ripens in January, and that from the second in July and August. In Trinidad the fruiting seasons are said to be July and October. The January crop in Ceylon is a light one, not over 100 fruits to a tree, while in the August crop 500 to 600 fruits a tree may be expected.

As to marketing, Fairchild says: "Although the mangosteen is a very delicate fruit, it has an exceedingly tough, thick rind, and on this account it is likely to be a good shipper. Fruits which were sent in cold storage to Washington from Trinidad were excellent when eaten twenty-one days later, even though they had been out of cold storage over a week." Shipments are regularly made from the Straits Settlements to the markets of Calcutta. When the fruits decay, the rind hardens instead of becoming soft.

Plate XXI. A young kaki tree in bearing.

Plate XXI. A young kaki tree in bearing.

Little is known regarding the enemies of the mangosteen. W. N. C. Belgrave 1 reports a fungous parasite, Zignoella garcineae, which causes the formation of cankers on the stems, working back from the young to the older branches. When the latter have been attacked, the foliage withers and eventually the entire tree dies. As a combative measure it is recommended to cut and burn trees which are attacked, in order to check the spread of the disease.

There are as yet no named varieties of the mangosteen in cultivation.