In northern Brazil, particularly in the Amazon region, the bakuri occurs wild. It is scarcely known in cultivation, but the fruit gathered from trees in the forest is preserved in tins and sold commercially to a limited extent. The genus Platonia contains only one or two species.

The tree is described as large, with oblong, acute, leathery leaves. The flowers are solitary, terminal, rose-colored, and showy. J. Barbosa Rodrigues 1 says that the fruits are the size of oranges, bright yellow in color, with several seeds surrounded by white pulp. The flavor is acidulous, sprightly, and very pleasant.

Jacques Huber of Para, Brazil, writes: "The bakuri is a hardy tree with us and does not require careful cultivation. Cut down, it springs up easily from suckers which arise from the roots. In Marajo it is considered a weed, difficult to exterminate, especially in pastures near houses."

The bakuri is sometimes listed botanically as Aristoclesia esculenta, Stuntz. In Brazil it has been offered by nurserymen under the common name bakupari, which properly belongs to a species of Rheedia.

The tree is probably strictly tropical in its requirements. It should repay horticultural attention.

Fig. 51. The bakupari (Rheedia brasilien sis), a Brazilian relative of the mangosteen. The skin is yellow, and the white pulp subacid and spicy in flavor. (X 1/2)

Fig. 51. The bakupari (Rheedia brasilien-sis), a Brazilian relative of the mangosteen. The skin is yellow, and the white pulp subacid and spicy in flavor. (X 1/2)

1 Hortus Fluminensis.