Fig. 73. Rose Arbours, Old Style

Fig. 73. Rose Arbours, Old Style

Rose arbours exist in various degrees of offensiveness. The old type of arbour was an expensive and ornate structure of carved metal (Fig. 73). It was supposed to be covered, of course, but somehow it always showed more metal than Roses. An arbour of knotted, gnarled stems, or even a light construction of poles, is better, if merit is judged, as it should be, by the nearness with which the object in view is approached. It is not likely that metal will ever be absolutely driven out of the Rose garden, but the less it is allowed to triumph over wood the nearer to nature the Rose garden will get.

Fig 74. Rose Arbours, New Style

Fig 74. Rose Arbours, New Style

As mentioned briefly in a previous chapter, a simple way of lengthening the duration of wooden supports is to pickle the base in a bath of creosote. Or they may be painted with Stockholm tar thinned with petroleum, or with gas tar. The simplest plan of all, however, is to char them.

Fig. 75. Supports For Pillar Roses

Fig. 75. Supports For Pillar Roses

A is made of 3/4-inch iron rod. It should be constructed in four pieces, and bolted together at the top.

B, the upright should if possible be tapering-1 inch at the bottom, diminishing to 1/2-inch at the top; this gives more support. The rings and stays should be of 1/2-inch iron.

Hedges and Screens

The culture of the Sweet Brier, and also of the Scotch Rose, to form hedges has been described in Chapter 11. It may, however, be noted that a "hedge" may be made of almost any of the free-growing, rambling varieties. Fig. 77 shows a rough hurdle, such as is used by Dean Hole, and Fig. 78 shows it covered with foliage and flowers. Where a screen is wanted a "hedge" of this nature serves admirably.

Fig. 77. A Home-Made Hurdle For A Rose Hedge

Fig. 77. A Home-Made Hurdle For A Rose Hedge

Fig. 78. The Hurdle Covered With Roses

Fig. 78. The Hurdle Covered With Roses

Tree Stumps

Tree stumps, short or long, look well when clothed with Roses. An old, weather-worn tree which is condemned may be so far spared that only the upper parts are cut away, the bole, and perhaps the principal fork, being left.

Trellises

The expanding wooden trelliswork of the suburban garden makes a comfortable home for Roses. Screwed on to uprights 4 feet apart, provided with a top beading, and painted green, it makes an admirable screen. This trelliswork is very cheap and convenient. Varieties like Bardou Job, Alister Stella Gray, and Homère are quite at home on it.

Umbrellas

Fig. 82. A Rose Umbrella

Fig. 82. A Rose Umbrella

Rose umbrellas are easily provided, given a wire standard surmounted by a circular wire framework. When well covered these are handsome objects.