Fig. 83. Tea Roses In A Vase

Fig. 83. Tea Roses In A Vase

The lover of cut Roses is catered for these latter days as he or she never was before. Big fragrant bowls of the old H.P.'s were not to be despised, but they were generally lumpy, unless arranged with exceptional skill. Moreover, their season was limited. The newer Teas and H.T.'s, with their neat flowers, long stems, and beautiful leafage, are in season out of doors for seven or eight months, so that a long supply is at command.

Little art is required to get beautiful effects with these, unless it be the art which holds the master key to simplicity. Broadly speaking the more simple the arrangement the better. As a matter of fact, a few long sprays placed loosely in a vase look charming.

It goes without saying, perhaps, that nothing but Rose foliage should be used with Rose flowers. Fern, Asparagus, Gypsophila, and such like "greenery" has its uses, but it is not wanted with Roses.

There is nothing to beat a vase lightly filled with sprays of one variety, intermingled with its own leafage (Fig. 83). Bamboo supports, with orifices at different heights (Fig. 84), are suitable for some purposes and positions. They are frequently exhibited at horticultural shows.

Table decorations entirely composed of Roses are sometimes seen, and the fact that simplicity can well hold its own with elaboration is proved by a reference to Figs. 85 and 86.

The former is a good sample of an elaborate table arrangement, with its large centre bowl and series of glass dishes, these being furnished with different varieties of Roses. The latter consists simply of Rosa Himalayica in a small bowl and side vases.

Baskets of Roses are frequently object lessons of the painful results of sardine-packing. Large H.P.'s want arranging with great self-restraint, otherwise there is a dead level of ugly blown flowers staring one in the face. The buds and leafage are the best. A trail of Smilax or small-leaved Ivy is permissible for the handle, but even this extraneous substance may be done away with if the bronzy growths of the Roses are handled with skill.

Fig 84. Tea Rose Sunrise In A Bamboo Support

Fig 84. Tea Rose Sunrise In A Bamboo Support

Fig. 85. A Table Decoration Of Roses

Fig. 85. A Table Decoration Of Roses

Fig. 86. A Table Of Rosa Himalayica

Fig. 86. A Table Of Rosa Himalayica

Fig. 87. A Basket Of Roses

Fig. 87. A Basket Of Roses