The pegged-down Rose plays its part in the garden, and it is often observable that in proportion to the space it occupies this type of plant gives an exceptional quantity of bloom. The reason is that the natural energies of the plant are allowed greater vent than in the case of the hard-pruned dwarf. As a matter of fact, there are many varieties of Roses grown systematically as dwarfs, and pruned somewhat severely in order to keep them within bounds, which from their naturally vigorous habit are better adapted for being pegged down.

The principle of pruning the pegged down Rose is to lightly shorten the strong shoots in spring, and when they have bloomed to remove them in order to make way for successional shoots which have broken up from the base. It is Raspberry pruning all over again.

Roses with short, twiggy shoots, whatever their section, are unsuitable for culture as pegged-down Roses. On the other hand, almost any class of Rose that has long, strong shoots may be pressed into service. The observant grower can frequently pick suitable plants for the purpose, whether Hybrid Perpetuals, Teas, or Noisettes, from his own beds.

Pegging down has the effect hinted at in advising the bending over of the strong shoots of pillar Roses, and also in bending down the rods of Grape Vines, namely ensuring a good break along the whole length of the cane. Plenty of Roses of strong habit which, hard pruned, give stems and leaves instead of flowers, may be made to bloom abundantly by treating them on the pegging-down system.