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Pictorial Practical Rose Growing | by Walter P. Wright



"Pictorial Practical Rose Growing" simply applies to the most popular flower of the garden a method of cultural elucidation which has won success when brought to bear on the orchard, the greenhouse, and the kitchen garden. With information on planting, pruning and much more about roses.

TitlePictorial Practical Rose Growing
AuthorWalter P. Wright
PublisherCassell And Company Limited
Year1902
Copyright1902, Walter P. Wright
AmazonPictorial Practical Rose Growing
Pictorial Practical Rose Growing
-Preface For Pictorial Practical Rose Growing
There are so many books on Roses in existence that the only excuses for writing another likely to find acceptance with the public are (1) that it is a great deal better than existing ones, or (2) ve...
-Chapter 1. A Rose Impressionism, with a Moral
Dawn! Dawn of a June morning! Dawn with the dew trembling on the shy grass, and the birds crazy with the passion of life. The Copper Beech at the garden gate has abandoned his illicit alliance with...
-Chapter 2. A Practical Purview Of Roses And Rose Gardens
Are we going to have a Rose Garden, or Roses in the garden? Here is a far-reaching question. Are we lords of ancestral acres, are we South African magnates, have we a million-tons-a-year trade in tea ...
-Chapter 3. About Rose Gardens
The Rose Garden of modern days is planned to give harbourage to Roses of varied forms. It is often a roomy place, well protected by belts of shrubs or trees. Its walks are perhaps arched at the entran...
-Fig. 1. Plan Of Rose Garden. I
Scales: A - F, 1 inch equals 32 feet; G - L, 1 inch equals 16 feet. A, centre, four plants of Crimson Rambler, some growths forming a pillar (see section G at f), and others trained to arches. The ...
-Fig. 3. Plan OF Rose Garden On Grass And Surroundings. III
Scale: 1 inch equals 32 feet. A. centre, four plants of red Climbing Teas, forming a pillar, and arched over so as to form half of four arches, selected from Waltham Climbers Nos. 1, 2, and 3, Rein...
-Chapter 4. Different Types of Roses
It will perhaps be useful to make a few remarks on the various classes of Roses. People are puzzled by such terms as Tea, Hybrid Tea, Noisette, Manetti, standard, and cutback. Some of the...
-Fig. 5. Stocks For Roses. I. Manetti And De La Grifferaie
A, one year old plant of Manetti from a cutting inserted the previous autumn: a, portion of the stem from which the buds were cut clean out; b, the base of the stem cut previously below a joint, tra...
-Fig. 6. Stocks For Roses. II. Cutting Brier
E, one year old plant of common Brier or Dog Rose of the hedges (Rosa canina) from a cutting of one year old, thoroughly ripened wood: d, the portion of the stem from which buds were carefully remov...
-Fig. 7. Stocks For Roses. III. Seedling Brier
G, one year old plant of seedling Brier or Dog Rose (Rosa canina): x, the radicle or descending axis developed into a tap root; y, the lateral or side root; z, the collar or point of junction of the...
-Fig. 8. Stocks For Roses. IV. Briers From Hedgerows
J, a straight, clean-stemmed Brier or Dog Rose (Rosa canina) as taken from a hedgerow, prepared, and planted: n, stem; o, a slanting cut at the desired height for a standard, made just above a joint...
-Chapter 5. How to Propagate Roses
We have learned what Rose stocks are, and may now turn to a consideration of the ways and means of getting Roses on them. In the first place, catch your hare. This may not be very easy. Amateurs an...
-How to Propagate Roses. Continued
Fig 9. How To Bud Roses A, growing shoot: a, b, buds; c, bud removed; d, bud with pith; e, com mencing to remove the pith; f, bud ready. B, stock: g, transverse out; h, longitudinal cut; i, bud in...
-Chapter 6. How to Prepare the Soil For Roses
All soils will not grow Roses equally well, but most kinds may be made to yield satisfactory results. There is comfort in this dictum. In particular it cheers the heart of the man who has heard so mu...
-Fig. 12. How To Prepare Soil For Planting Roses. I
A, section of a heavy, deep loam, or loam resting on clay. Soil before preparation: a, top soil and turf; b, second spit; c, subsoil, heavier, and generally too stubborn for working readily when bro...
-Fig. 13. How To Prepare Soil For Planting Roses. II
C, section of gravelly soil. Soil before preparation: p, top spit, relatively free from stones, of free-working loam; q, second spit, coarser than the top soil, and more compact, yet admitting of th...
-Fig. 14. How To Prepare Soil For Planting Roses. III
F, section of very heavy clay soil. Soil before preparation: d, very strong loam verging into clay surfaced by turf or sward; e, yellowish clay; f, clay and stones. Preparing bed: g, 3-inch drain at...
-Fig. 15. How To Prepare Soil For Planting Roses. IV
H, section of very sandy soil and prepared bed. Soil before preparation: p, surface soil with turf and not more than 2 or 3 inches of dark vegetable mould; q, sand. Prepared bed: r, clay; s, top spi...
-Chapter 7. How to Prepare the Roses For Planting
The Roses are here, the ground is ready. No longer is the Rose grower a navvy; he has become an artist. With a complacent eye he surveys the bed. which is swollen like a boa constrictor after a heavy...
-Chapter 8. How to Plant Roses
When the soil has been properly prepared for Roses, planting is both swiftly and simply performed. When it has not been properly prepared, planting is slow and difficult. People may have realised thi...
-Fig. 16. How to Plant Roses. I
A, a one year old dwarf Hybrid Perpetual lifted and prepared for planting: a, shoot from the central eye of the bud inserted in the previous season (sometimes the only growth); b, shoots from the bu...
-Fig. 17. How to Plant Roses. II
D, A Rose tree properly planted: m, a layer of thoroughly decayed manure covered with fine soil; n, the soil which has been excavated replaced, the roots spread out in the hole, with the collar just...
-Fig. 18. How to Plant Roses. III
H, a one year old Hybrid Perpetual from a cutting, the shoots of which have been shortened to about 12 inches: v, a strong root which has taken a straight down direction; w, roots which have taken a...
-Chapter 9. How to Prune Roses
The psychologist, who loves to bring his mental dissecting knife into play on human characteristics and emotions, would find a little material for his operations if he were to turn his attention to th...
-How To Prune Dwarf Hybrid Perpetuals
To point this plea for moderate pruning, and at the same time help the fair grower who, hitherto averse from pruning at all, is now driven reluctantly to ask for practical guidance in the hateful duty...
-How To Prune Dwarf Hybrid Perpetuals. Continued
Fig. 19. How To Prune Dwarf Hybrid Perpetuals A, two years old tree: a, point of first pruning to five buds, resulting in five growths and a sixth from an underground bud; b, June flowering shoots;...
-Fig. 20. How To Prune Dwarf Tea-Scented Roses
A, cutting of Hybrid Tea La France, with outline of first season's weakly growths: a, roots; b, shoots. B, plant (A), two years old: c, points where weakly shoots (A b) were pruned to one bud each ...
-Fig. 21. How To Prune Standard Tea-Scented Roses
A, upper part of a standard in the first growth from the bud; a, stem, Brier or Dog Rose; b, point of cutting off the shoot in which the bud was inserted the previous summer about 1 inch beyond the ...
-How To Prune Dwarf Teas Roses
Let us look a little farther into the details of pruning, this time in connection with Teas. Every year these lovely varieties - which, be it remarked, are far more perpetual than the so-called Hyb...
-Rose Pruning Standards
The pruning of standards is conducted on much the same lines as that of dwarfs. As more people bud standards than bud dwarfs, it will be well to show, in Fig. 21, he stages by which a good flowering h...
-How To Prune Rose Climbers - Maréchal Niel
If dwarf Roses are not grown less than they used to be, climbers are certainly grown more. The introduction of Crimson Rambler had a very remarkable effect. It not only added to our gardens an exceedi...
-Fig. 22. How To Plant The Rose Maréchal Niel In A Lean-to-House
B, a section of a lean-to house: a, subsoil; b, the back wall, preferably built hollow; c, the front wall; d, the front light, opening the whole length of the house by a crank and lever apparatus; e...
-Fig. 23. How To Plant The Rose Maréchal Niel In A Span-Roof House
C, a section of a span-roof house: w, the side walls; x, the side lights, opening the whole length of the house by a crank and lever apparatus; y, the roof; z, a cap ventilator the whole length of t...
-Fig. 24. First Stages Of Pruning The Rose Marechal Niel
D, a one-stemmed plant at the first pruning: k, the point of shortening to induce vigorous growths to push in the following spring for forming the basal rods; l, the upper part of the plant, which i...
-How To Prune Rose Climbers - William Allen Richardson
This favourite Rose, which is only a few degrees less popular than Maréchal Niel, succeeds on the cutting back system remarkably well when grown in rich soil. With a tolerably dry atmosphere, and in v...
-How To Prune Rose Climbers - Gloire de Dijon
Gloire de Dijon remains, and is likely to remain, one of the most popular of garden Roses. It is not often seen at shows, because its flowers are imperfect from the exhibition standard. In this connec...
-How To Prune Pillar Roses
The pillar Rose is an important feature in modern Rose gardens. Not only is it a beautiful object in itself, but it serves to prevent the sense of uniformity which would prevail were there nothing but...
-Fig. 25. How To Prune The Rose Marechal Neil On The Long-Rod System
F, a plant in its third season's growth: w, the stem; x, the point of the heading or first pruning; y, side branches from which long rods are originated for producing growths one year and flowering ...
-Fig. 26. How To Prune The Rose William Allen Richardson For Wall Or Trellis
A, a one year old plant: a, leading growth; b, side growths; c, point of shortening to originate vigorous shoots from the base. B, a two years old plant with three strong shoots: d, points of short...
-How To Prune Roses for Pegging Down
The pegged-down Rose plays its part in the garden, and it is often observable that in proportion to the space it occupies this type of plant gives an exceptional quantity of bloom. The reason is that ...
-Fig. 27. How To Prune The Rose Gloire De Dijon
A, short or spur pruning: a, shoot shortened to three buds, not counting the basal bud, or the small ones at the side of the shoot where it issues from the previous year's wood; b, basal bud - there...
-How To Prune Weeping Roses
If not of the first importance in Rose gardens, weeping Roses have their value. When well furnished with healthy flowering wood they are objects of considerable interest and beauty. Not every variety...
-Fig. 28. How To Prune Pillar Roses
A, one year old plant of Reine Olga de Wurtemburg from a cutting: a, free root formation; b, leading growth shortened to about 15 inches; c, vigorous side growth cut back to about 9 inches; d, weakl...
-Fig. 29. How To Prune Pegged-Down Roses. Branches Left Long
A, one year old plant of a vigorous growing Rose cut down close to the ground, or to within three buds of the junction of stock and scion: a, point of shortening the maiden (the first growth from th...
-Fig. 30. How To Prune Pegged-Down Roses. Long Pruning
E, maiden, planted and cut down: k, point of shortening to the ground in the spring after planting; l, vigorous growths developing in summer. F, two years old plant which has not produced strong a...
-How To Prune The Rose Penzance Briers
No modem Rose garden is complete without its Penzance Briers. Beautiful in blossom, attractive later in the season owing to their brightly coloured heps, graceful in growth, sweetleaved, the lovely ra...
-Fig. 31. How To Prune Weeping Roses
A, one year old head of Noisette Rose Aimée Yibert on the Brier stock: stem of stock; b, main growth from the bud, cut back at the first pruning to three buds; c, vigorous shoots produced as a resul...
-How To Plant and Prune Rose Hedges
The Penzance Briers may be used for forming hedges, but the common Sweet Brier is more commonly used for this purpose. It is, of course, much cheaper than the Penzance Briers, and if less beautiful in...
-How To Prune Banksian Roses
The Banksian Roses are little pruned. Hard cutting means wood, but not bloom. What is required is a good supply of long, strong, well ripened shoots, therefore systematic cutting back is not advisable...
-Fig. 32. How To Prune The Rose Penzance Briers
A, two years old plant of Penzance Brier Anne of Geierstein: a, one year old growths; b, two years old wood, this being the growth which the plant had when planted, and which was not pruned the fir...
-Fig. 33. How To Plant And Prune Rose Hedges. I
A, a year old or seedling Sweet Brier, Rosa rubiginosa: a, tap root; b, side roots; c, collar; d, leading shoot; e, side shoots. B, a two years old Sweet Brier: f, points of shortening the roots w...
-Fig. 34. How To Plant And Prune Rose Hedges. II
E, part of a hedge of Sweet Brier: s, plants untrimmed in the season of growth, a plan sometimes adopted in the first season; t, points of pruning to ensure a compact and branched habit; u, plants ...
-How To Prune Crimson Rambler Rose
The immense popularity of Crimson Rambler renders a few words on its management obligatory. There is reason to fear that the wonderful luxuriance of this grand Rose will lead to cultural neglect. It ...
-Fig. 35. How To Prune Crimson Rambler Rose
G, a tree at the third winter pruning after planting: o, point of cutting down a one shoot plant in spring after planting, and only one shoot retained in the following summer; p, point of shortenin...
-Chapter 10. The Enemies of Roses
It would add to the comfort of the Rose grower if he could feel that, having well performed his duty in the planting and pruning of his Roses, he had done all that was necessary to secure them long li...
-Mildew - The Enemies of Roses
Rose mildew, the fungus Sphaerotheca pannosa, is one of the many pests of Roses. It attacks plants both in the open air and under glass, covering them with a whitish down, and causing loss of foliage ...
-Orange Fungus or Red Rust - The Enemies of Roses
When the experienced Rose grower observes orange-yellow spots on the leaves of his plants in early summer he knows that he sees the advance guard of the fungoid disease known variously as orange fungu...
-Canker in Maréchal Niel - The Enemies of Roses
Canker frequently attacks the plant at the point of union. It is familiar to growers of Maréchal Niel, both out of doors and under glass; indeed, so common is it that many look for it as a natural cou...
-Fig. 36. Attacks Of Caterpillars And Grubs On Roses
A, growth completely fastened together by the threads and overspread by the web of the caterpillars from which develops the Small Ermine Moth, Hyponomeuta padella, as found on the Dog Rose in spring...
-Fig. 37. Mildew On Roses
A, affected growths of Hybrid Perpetual Roses: a, first or summer growth which has been shortened after flowering to induce vigorous second growths to push for the second blooming; b, second or so-c...
-Fig. 38. Orange Fungus On Roses
A, a portion of the growth of a Hybrid Perpetual Rose affected with orange fungus in several stages. Aecidium stage: a, a large pustule on the previous year's wood, which has developed from a minute...
-Rose Washes for Insects and Fungi
Bordeaux Mixture To prepare Bordeaux Mixture take 2 1/2 lb. of sulphate of copper (bluestone). Dissolve in a little hot water...... 2 1/2 lb. of freshly burned lime. Dissolve in cold water ...........
-Fig. 39. Canker In Marechal Niel - The Enemies of Roses
A, a plant infected in various parts: a, an attack below ground at the point of budding; b, canker on the stem above ground; e, an attack on a branch; d, a branch which has collapsed through being g...
-Roses with Green or Blind Centres - The Enemies of Roses
These troubles can hardly, with perfect consistency, be included amongst Rose enemies, inasmuch as they are not the work of insects or fungi. They are, however, very real. Roses frequently come with ...
-Chapter 11. How to Exhibit Roses
When the Rose grower becomes an exhibitor he develops into a rosarian. It would be futile to moralise on the hollowness of the reasons by which the great metamorphosis comes about. Sufficient is it ...
-Fig. 40. How to Exhibit Roses. I. Stands And Boxes
A, Dean Hole's box - lath system for tubes instead of holes: a, back (7 inches deep); b, front (5 inches deep); c, laths (3/4 inch in depth and 1 7/8 inch in width); d, crosspiece of wood (one at ea...
-Fig. 41. How to Exhibit Roses. II. Cups And Tubes
G, common zinc cups and tubes: w, cup (usual form, 2 inches wide); x, cup (ordinary funnel shaped); y, tube; z, cup and tube fitted; a, cup; b, tube; c, clip for zinc tube (the clip affixed to the s...
-Rose Exhibition Boxes
Fig. 40 will give some very useful information about show boxes, and it may be briefly supplemented. The following table gives the standard sizes: - Collections of thirty-six, forty-eight, and sev...
-Cups and Tubes - How to Exhibit Roses
The support for a Rose in an exhibition stand is usually in two parts, a cup and a tube, the former open at the bottom, the latter closed, and holding water. The cup being of slightly smaller diameter...
-Shades and Shelters - How to Exhibit Roses
It is scarcely necessary to say that the weather is a very important factor in connection with Rose showing. What does it not affect, from great cricket matches to school treats? To grow fine Roses is...
-Selecting and Arranging Flowers - How to Exhibit Roses
The exhibitor should go over his flowers on the evening before the show day and select a number of promising blooms. The flowers should have so far passed the bud stage that the outer petals are half ...
-Chapter 12. Roses In Pots
Fig. 43. A House Of Pot Roses It has been urged against the Rose, by those outside her charmed circle, that she is a short-lived beauty, whose season is gone almost as soon as it comes. Were this ...
-Fig. 44. Shades For Show Roses
A, Dean Hole's zinc cap or helmet, 8 inches in diameter and 6 inches in depth: a, ventilation openings; b, socket; c, stake; d, wooden wedges. B, dish-cover shaped zinc shade, 1 foot in diameter an...
-What and When to Buy - Roses In Pots
Buy young plants always. The best of growers cannot maintain the vigour of Roses which have been subjected to forcing unimpaired for many years. Young plants are best, and it is not at all a bad plan ...
-Pots, Soil, and Drainage - Roses In Pots
In starting the pot culture of Roses, a common mistake is to use very large pots. Six-inch (32's) are generally quite large enough for young plants. If a very strong plant were purchased or lifted, wi...
-Roots and Potting - Roses In Pots
Snip off the ends of any roots that are broken, but if the root structure is fibrous do not otherwise reduce it. If the fibres have to be coiled a little in the pot it will not matter. If the root are...
-Fig. 45. Roses In Pots. I. Bushes
A, a one year old plant from a bud or graft, showing potting: a, drain age; b, a layer of the rougher parts of the compost; c, soil; d, roots. Pruning: e, points of shortening to two buds when the ...
-How to Prune for Bushes - Roses In Pots
The time of pruning must depend upon when the plants are desired to bloom. If the plants are to be forced into flower in February, pruning must be done in November, and the plants started in a warm ho...
-Repotting - Roses In Pots
The plants may be repotted in September, and if they have rooted well, and are healthy, a size larger pot will be required. It is wise to have the fresh pots ready washed and drained, and the compost ...
-Fig. 46. Roses In Pots. Pyramids
A, a young plant from the open. Section of pot: a, drainage; b, soil; c, space for water. Plant: d, roots shortened, because strong, long, and bare, in order to encourage fibres; e, point of cutting...
-Chapter 13. Rose Sections And Selections
The writer on Roses has a kaleidoscopic view of the Rose garden in all its stages in the course of an afternoon's work at an essay. As he touches on the various points in the routine of culture he see...
-Rose Sections And Selections. Continued
Ayrshires You can have no hardier Roses than the Ayrshires, which are forms of Rosa repens capreolata (the National, by the way, sticks to the old name, now considered merely a synonym, Arvensis). Th...
-Fig. 47. Roses In Pots. Twiners
A, a one year old plant from a cutting properly potted and pruned. Section of pot (8-inch): a, drainage; b, layer of rough compost; c, soil; d, space for water. Plant: e, roots coiled round the insi...
-Briers (Penzance) - Rose Sections And Selections
With what marvellous patience Lord Penzance must have worked to evolve these from the Sweet Brier, Rosa rubiginosa! Their first beauty is in early summer, when the lovely single flowers clothe the pe...
-Garden Roses - Rose Sections And Selections
The National catalogue has two great classes: (1) Exhibition Roses; (2) Garden Roses. The sub-sections of the latter are very numerous, and include most of those named above, together with many others...
-Hybrid Perpetuals - Rose Sections And Selections
In this we have the greatest of all classes. Its origin is wropt in mistry. As mentioned in Chapter 4, there has been a great deal of in-and-out cross-breeding, several species, or hybrids between s...
-Hybrid Teas - Rose Sections And Selections
This is practically a new class, although one or two oldish Roses, notably Captain Christy and La France, are included in it. The section grows yearly in numbers and importance. It is remarkable for d...
-Polyantha - Rose Sections And Selections
The Polyantha Roses (descendants of Rosa multiflora) were until recent years a comparatively unimportant section, but the introduction of Crimson Rambler and its sister varieties has raised it to a mu...
-Teas and Noisettes - Rose Sections And Selections
This great class - great in numbers, great in beauty - is second only to the Hybrid Perpetuals. Nay, is it second? A little tender some of the varieties may be, but withal they eclipse the H.P.'s as ...
-Teas and Noisettes - Rose Sections And Selections. Continued
A Selection of Climbing Roses Aimée Vibert, white. Bardou Job, crimson. Bouquet d'Or, yellow. Cheshunt Hybrid, cherry. Climbing Captain Christy, flesh. Gloire de Dijon, buff. Fig. 69. T. Gloi...
-Chapter 14. Interesting Features of Rose Gardens
The Rose garden of rectangular beds is as much the joy of many Rose growers as ever it was, but the Rose garden of varied and picturesque features is growing rapidly in favour. There is no need to ex...
-Arbours - Interesting Features of Rose Gardens
Fig. 73. Rose Arbours, Old Style Rose arbours exist in various degrees of offensiveness. The old type of arbour was an expensive and ornate structure of carved metal (Fig. 73). It was supposed to b...
-Arches - Interesting Features of Rose Gardens
The wire arch rides rampant in suburban gardens, largely because it is so much quicker and easier to go to the ironmonger's than to hunt the neighbourhood for stems and poles. Yet a little trouble is ...
-Banks - Interesting Features of Rose Gardens
In the chapter on soil preparation a method of cultivation was indicated which renders it easy to perform well a task which is often done with a great deal of labour, and then badly. It may now be poi...
-Pergolas - Interesting Features of Rose Gardens
A pergola might be described as a series of connected arches, were it not for the fact that many pergolas are flat. There is nothing more beautiful in a garden than a well-made and well-covered pergo...
-Chapter 15. Roses as Cut flowers
Fig. 83. Tea Roses In A Vase The lover of cut Roses is catered for these latter days as he or she never was before. Big fragrant bowls of the old H.P.'s were not to be despised, but they were gene...









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