Fig. 9. An Easy Way Of Making Liquid Manure

Fig. 9. An Easy Way Of Making Liquid Manure

This consists of a perforated tin A containing sheep droppings or other manure, fixed over a wooden bucket B and under a tap.

The weak liquid manure resulting is safe for nearly all plants.

Fig. 10. Another Way Of Making Liquid Manure

Fig. 10. Another Way Of Making Liquid Manure

Get a paraffin cask, char the interior, fit the lower half A with a tap and mount it on a stand, attach a piece of perforated zinc to the interior by means of a couple of blocks C, C, and place in some manure B. If the upper half is fed with water there will be a constant supply of liquid manure ready.

Artichokes

The Chinese, the Jerusalem, and the Globe Artichokes present us with considerable differences. The first two certainly approximate, but the gulf between them and the Globe is wide. Chinese and Jerusalem Artichokes do not need heavily dunged ground. A well-tilled soil will yield a full crop of sound, finely flavoured tubers if dressed with decayed stuff once in three years. Heavy applications of dung may increase the crop, but the tubers are coarse in appearance and rank in taste. Globe Artichokes enjoy liberal dressings of dung.

Beans

In the main, the manurial treatment that suits Peas will suit Beans, and they may, therefore, be considered together.

Carrots

The remarks as to Beet apply, and need not be repeated. I shall, however, have some fresh points about Carrots to discuss when I come to general culture.

Leeks

I need not repeat the remarks made under Celery. They apply, substantially.

Parsnips

The remarks made under Beet have a good general application. The unwholesome - looking brown blotches on the shoulders of Parsnips, known as canker, are always the worst in freshly dunged ground. Moreover, forking of the roots, expressively termed "spronkiness" by our cottagers, is directly due to dung.

Fig. 11. A Liquid Manure Ladle

Fig. 11. A Liquid Manure Ladle

This handy little dipper is useful for ladling liquid manure out of buckets or tubs. It is made of an old tin, fitted with a handle in the form of a piece of stick.