The remarks under the heading of Borecole, Broccoli, and Brussels Sprouts save me the necessity of referring to club-root and gall weevil. I may, however, say a word about the flea beetle, Haltica nemorum. This tiny bronze black pest is a complete bar to Turnip cultivation in some districts. Moistening the seed in turpentine before sowing is recommended, but it is not a sure remedy. Vigorous dusting with soot and wood ashes in the early morning, when the enemy is sluggish, is the best cultural step.

Fig. 39. Aconite. Fig. 40. Horseradish.

Fig. 39. Aconite. Fig. 40. Horseradish.

Deaths have occurred through mistaking Aconite roots for Horseradish. The above figures show the difference between them.

Fig. 41. Turnip Attacked By Gall Weevil.

Fig. 41. Turnip Attacked By Gall Weevil.

A, Turnip, natural size: a, top, quite clean and healthy; b, the "bulb," white, clear in the skin, and sound in the flesh; c, the tap or main root, with healthy rootlets; d, abnormal growths called "galls"; e, a depressed blotch, discoloured at the centre and round the margin, caused by the decay of the flesh of the Turnip.

B, the top of an excrescence cut off and inverted, natural size: f, the skin, or cuticular and epidermal cells; g, the flesh; h, a cavity or hollow; i, a grub - the excrescence or gall maker.

C, an excrescence or gall from which the top was cut off, enlarged 3 diameters: j, the skin; k, the flesh; l, the cavity; m, a grub.

D, the Turnip gall weevil: n, natural size; o, enlarged 5 diameters.

E, the Turnip gall weevil grub, enlarged 5 times.