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Pictorial Practical Vegetable Growing | by Walter P. Wright



In a fairly wide experience of the world in general, and of horticulture in particular, I can truthfully say that I have encountered only one class of people who are thoroughly contented with the world - contented with what they do in it, contented with what they make out of it, and, above all, contented beyond all ordinary contentment with themselves. These are the vegetable growers. How better could perfect happiness be expressed than in what is here said?

TitlePictorial Practical Vegetable Growing
AuthorWalter P. Wright
PublisherCassell & Company
Year1906
Copyright1906, Walter P. Wright
AmazonPictorial Practical Vegetable Growing
Pictorial Practical Vegetable Growing
-Chapter 1. A Kitchen Garden, And The Wonders It Works
The victorious vegetable grower is a person who drinks deeply of the joy of life. Artists have their moments of happiness and their moments of despair; poets look on the world by turns cheerfully and...
-Plan For A Vegetable Plot Of Half Acre Size
Fig. 2. A Vegetable Plot Of About Half An Acre (Exact size: 180 by 120 feet.) References To Fig. 2. A, fence; B, paths; C, D, E, F, entrances. References to borders round the fence: a, Vegetable ...
-A few Plain Figures For Planting Gardens
1. Twenty square rods, poles, or perches of ground, each square rod, pole, or perch being, of course, 30 1/4 square yards, will, if well cropped, supply a family of at least four people with vegetable...
-Plan For One Acre Vegetable Plot
Fig. 3. A Plot Of About One Acre Cropped With Fruit And Vegetables (Size of plot: 75 by 65 yards. Scale 1 inch = 60 feet.) A, the entrance to the garden from the south. B, the entrance to the gar...
-Chapter 2. Successional Cropping
In the science of agriculture the cropping of the land proceeds, like a banquet, by courses. There is, however, this significant difference, that while in the feast each successive course leads on...
-The Value Of Rotation Cropping Of Vegetable Plots
The value of rotation cropping is claimed to be established in two directions - (1) avoiding soil exhaustion, (2) averting insect or fungoid attacks. 1. Given ordinary farm culture, it is likely enou...
-Chapter 3. How To Till The Soil
Flow to get double pay without doing double work is a problem which has harassed many a working man. It has likewise exercised the minds of a great many people who are not working men. It has never ...
-Chapter 4. Thoughts About Using Manure On Your Vegetables
The reduction of manuring to an exact science proceeds apace, but a good deal of water will run under the Forth Bridge before the average cultivator has made up his mind that it is worth while to look...
-Groups Of Vegetables And The Amount Of Manure For Each
We ought, I think, to put our vegetables into groups in order to get into a proper position for suiting their requirements. Group No 1 might be that class of vegetables which develop by swelling rapi...
-Manure Needed For Specific Vegetables
Fig. 9. An Easy Way Of Making Liquid Manure This consists of a perforated tin A containing sheep droppings or other manure, fixed over a wooden bucket B and under a tap. The weak liquid manure res...
-Asparagus - Manure Needed For Specific Vegetables
We have here a somewhat uncommon vegetable -one difficult to group, it has the sort of fibrous, matted rootstock which generally takes up large stores of food from the soil, and might, therefore, be e...
-Beetroot - Manure Needed For Specific Vegetables
A grossly over-manured crop. In my opinion, a man, tilling his soil well, who kept manure away from his Beet altogether for ten years, would get 50 per cent, more usable, saleable, and show roots than...
-Cabbages and Greens Generally - Manure Needed For Specific Vegetables
Borecole, Broccoli, Brussels Sprouts, Cabbages, Cauliflowers, and Savoys constitute a group of the highest value. Collectively they come next to the Potato in importance, for they give us an all-the-y...
-Celery - Manure Needed For Specific Vegetables
I am at hopeless war with the manure cart champions in connection with this vegetable. They would not eat an oyster if they knew that the succulent bivalve came from a bed within a hundred miles of a ...
-Cucumbers - Manure Needed For Specific Vegetables
A little well-decayed manure may be mixed with the compost for Cucumbers, but if some coarse, rough, lumpy loam can be got for those under glass, and sulphate of potash at the rate of one pint per bus...
-Onions - Manure Needed For Specific Vegetables
The Onion is a plant which loves to send its roots far below the surface. When it gets its toes well braced into sound British soil it is a happy plant, and the man who owns the ground is happy too wh...
-Peas - Manure Needed For Specific Vegetables
I cannot believe that the general system of manuring Peas is based on true principles of garden economy. I believe three parts of the manure used to be unnecessary, and therefore wasteful. The fact th...
-Potatoes - Manure Needed For Specific Vegetables
One never realises the absurdity of indiscriminate manuring more fully than when he observes the difference between the development of a Potato and, say, a Brussels Sprout. In the former case we have ...
-Tomatoes - Manure Needed For Specific Vegetables
The majority of cultivators have got pretty near to the truth on the manuring question with one crop alone, and that happens to be the Tomato. It is generally recognised that very little manure is adv...
-Vegetable Marrows - Manure Needed For Specific Vegetables
Through some unwritten and inscrutable law, it has come to be believed that the dung bed is the natural home of the Vegetable Marrow. I pointed out the fallacy of it all years ago, and I do so again n...
-Do You Need Manure And Fertilisers In Growing Vegetables
In reference to this point, I had the best Marrow bed of my life in 1901. It was established on well-dug but unmanured soil. The plants were a little slow in starting, and we only cut one or two odd f...
-Notes on Chemical Fertilisers
The knowledge that chemical manures have been used with highly successful results in vegetable growing, and may be in other cases if a proper system is adopted, cannot fail to prove of interest to lar...
-Chapter 5. What You Need To Know About Seeds
The man who wanders into a seed shop in spring to buy an ounce of Parsnip seed rarely realises what a mine of interest is packed away in the drawers, bags, and pigeon-holes. The seed shop is a storeho...
-Handy Appliances For Working Seed Beds
Fig. 18. A Bed Marker. In planting out seedlings, a piece of wood set with stout nails at the right distance apart is useful, as a number of spaces can be marked at once. Fig. 19. A Transforme...
-How Much Seed Is Required For Planting
In giving a table with the object of affording a guide to sowers and planters, I would premise that a difficulty in calculating arises from the fact that it is the custom to sow some seeds broadcast a...
-How To Make A Hotbed For Planting Vegetables
Fig. 27. How To Make A Hotbed For A Single Light Frame. A, ground plan: a, frame area (24 square feet); b, bed, 18 inches larger all ways than the frame (area, 63 square feet); c, stakes at the cor...
-Chapter 6. Diseases And Insect Pests
The lecturer on horticultural subjects soon finds that the joint in his armour which is tested the most frequently is that bearing on his knowledge of the enemies of crops, and the means of extirpatin...
-Beans - Diseases And Insect Pests
There are two enemies of Beans which surpass in mischief all others, namely the black dolphin and the red spider. Black Dolphin - Pest of Beans This is the great pest of Broad Beans such as Windsors...
-Beetroot - Diseases And Insect Pests
Birds - Pest of Beetroot We cannot very well class birds as either insects or fungi, but they make themselves felt all the same. Irate gardeners are apt to declare that the sparrow is beyond classifi...
-Borecole, Broccoli, Brussels Sprouts, Cabbages, and Cauliflowers - Diseases And Insect Pests
The three valuable Winter Greens, with their useful companion the Savoy, also Cabbages and Cauliflowers, suffer in common from several troublesome enemies, on which I will make a few remarks. Club-ro...
-Carrots - Diseases And Insect Pests
The only enemy of Carrots which, in my experience, is a perpetual source of serious danger, is the maggot of the Carrot fly, Psila Rosae. This pest almost ruins the Carrot crop in some instances. Ther...
-Celery - Diseases And Insect Pests
The great Celery enemy is the small fly called Tephritis onopordinis, which deposits eggs between the skins of the leaf. The greyish zigzags which are seen on the leaves of Celery in summer and autumn...
-Cucumbers - Diseases And Insect Pests
Cucumber growers have two rather troublesome foes to deal with, namely red spider and stem-canker. The first will never have a chance to gain a footing if abundance of moisture is provided; therefore,...
-Onions - Diseases And Insect Pests
Maggot - Pest of Onions The maggot of the Onion fly, Anthomyia ceparum, is a terrible thorn in the side of kitchen gardeners. It does not, as a rule, do much damage in wet seasons, because the eggs l...
-Peas - Diseases And Insect Pests
In wet, growing weather, Peas are tolerably free from insects and fungi, but in dry seasons they are attacked by several. They are always, of course, liable to attack by other enemies. Birds - Pest o...
-Potatoes - Diseases And Insect Pests
It would lift a weight off the minds of vegetable growers if some good genius could give us the fine qualities of the best sorts in conjunction with such vigour of constitution as sets disease at defi...
-Tomatoes - Diseases And Insect Pests
The Tomato as an outdoor crop is, like its relative the Potato, a creature of the weather. Given a dry, warm season, the plant sets and swells abundance of fruit, if the cultural treatment is correct....
-Turnips - Diseases And Insect Pests
The remarks under the heading of Borecole, Broccoli, and Brussels Sprouts save me the necessity of referring to club-root and gall weevil. I may, however, say a word about the flea beetle, Haltica nem...
-Chapter 7. Harvesting and Storing Root Vegetables
From time immemorial a feud has raged between gardeners and cooks on the score of vegetables. When placed on the table, an irate master has had to complain bitterly of inferior quality (the comparison...
-Chapter 8. Growing Artichokes
In the Jerusalem and Globe Artichokes we have two vegetables that are comparatively little grown in small gardens. The latter is certainly not worth the amount of space it demands to the cottager or s...
-Chapter 9. Growing Asparagus
Asparagus, often corrupted in country districts to sparrow (or sparrer!) grass, is the old plant Asparagus officinalis, which has been known for thousands of years, grows wild in some parts of Britain...
-Chapter 10. Growing Beans
By one of those singular chances which set us speculating at times, there has grown up a species of social distinction between the Broad Bean (Faba vulgaris or Vicia Faba) and the Kidney Bean in its t...
-Chapter 11. Growing Beetroot
In the Garden Beet, Beta vulgaris, we have a highly developed vegetable, the making of which has given our seedsmen no small amount of trouble. It and the Mangold Wurzel of the fields, Beta vulgaris m...
-Chapter 12. Growing Borecole, Broccoli, Brussels sprouts, and Savoys, collectively known as Winter Greens
Nothing is more interesting than to speculate on the stages by which garden vegetables of choice strains have been developed. Look at the original Brassica oleracea, and marvel at the processes by whi...
-Growing Borecole
The Cottager's Kale is perhaps typical of this useful class, and with its many companions, such as the Dwarf Green and Tall Green Curled, the Asparagus, and the Hearting, it gives us a very valuable...
-Growing Broccoli
People come to grief with Broccoli because they will treat it like Cauliflowers. Botanically the same, the two plants are, culturally, wide asunder. To grow a Cauliflower well you want a deep, rich, l...
-Growing Brussels Sprouts
A long, steady season of growth in a firm, not very rich, soil will give firmer and sweeter Sprouts than one violent electric-car rush, although it may not give them so large. I have tried the rush sy...
-Chapter 13. Growing Cabbages
It is a poor kitchen garden that has not its bed of Cabbages in spring. The Cabbage (Brassica oleracea) is a vegetable that can hardly be excelled in usefulness by any other that is grown. Most peopl...
-Chapter 14. Growing Carrots
The easiest vegetable in the garden to grow, says the man with a deep, light, sandy soil. About the worst you can have to do decently, growls the one with tenacious clay. Carrot culture is a much...
-Chapter 15. Growing Cauliflower
Theoretically, the Cauliflower should be one of the easiest vegetables to grow that the garden contains; practically, it is one of the most difficult. A plot of ground, a spade, a heap of manure, a t...
-Chapter 16. Growing Celery
A tantalising vegetable is Apium graveolens. It excites the palate of the dyspeptic, and ravages his internal mechanism. Raw Celery is not for all the world, yet for those who can digest it the nut-f...
-Chapter 17. Growing Cucumbers
The succulent and seductive Cucumber, Cucumis sativa, has no pretensions to nutritive value. There is only one honest reason for eating it, and that is because you like it. It is indigestible, and the...
-Chapter 18. Growing Leeks
I am constantly singing the praises of the Leek, Allium Porrum, because I think it is a better friend to the kitchen gardener than he realises. When is a nicely cooked dish of Leeks other than appetis...
-Chapter 19. Growing Mushrooms
The Mushroom (Agaricus campestris) is an elusive fungus. It will flourish amazingly in some places, and in others will absolutely refuse to respond to the coaxing of the cultivator. I once knew a man...
-Chapter 20. Growing Onions
I have heard it remarked that the best Onion grower is the man who is the proud possessor of the largest feet, which is a delicate way of hinting that the secret of successful Onion culture is firm so...
-Chapter 21. Growing Parsnips
It would be waste of space to devote a lengthy chapter to Parsnips after what has already been said about soil and manuring, also about Beetroots and Carrots. Fig. 60. Results Of Surface Manur...
-Chapter 22. Growing Peas
The Pea, Pisum sativum, is the great vegetable delicacy of the garden, and it is small wonder that so much interest is manifested in its culture. The various points of management seem to possess an in...
-Chapter 23. Growing Potatoes
There is beauty as well as utility in a well-grown Potato - a beauty that the eye of the grower can see, if no other can. No garden crop is there, be it flower or fruit or vegetable, which can rival i...
-When Should Potatoes Be planted?
All a question of soil and situation. On a warm, sheltered border, especially if the soil be light, February or early March planting is safe; but in exposed places, particularly if the soil be stiff a...
-Types Of Potatoes To Grow
Fig. 71. Potato Type - Sensation. Fig. 72. Potato Type - Ideal Fig. 73. Potato Type - Satisfaction. Eureka, with many a better Potato, has passed into the great limbo of the forgotten, but ...
-Chapter 24. Growing Rhubarb
It is as unnecessary to sing the praises of Rhubarb as it would be foolish to decry it. The community has made up its mind that it likes Rhubarb, that Rhubarb is good for it, and that consequently Rhu...
-Chapter 25. Growing Seakale
Seakale is looked upon by most people rather as an expensive luxury than an everyday vegetable, and so it is - for the man in a hurry. For the man who is not impelled by a feverish eagerness to have p...
-Chapter 26. Growing Tomatoes
There is no abatement in the interest that Tomatoes have commanded these past twenty years, and there is not likely to be. The crop has secured a position from which it cannot be dislodged. Its cultur...
-Chapter 27. Growing Turnips
'‘Take away the flea beetle, and we will do the rest I fancy I hear many harassed kitchen gardeners groaning this. Well, I have said my say in an earlier chapter about the arch-enemy, and I can add...
-Chapter 28. Growing Vegetable Marrows
In my remarks on manuring I expressed the opinion that the manure bed is not an unmixed blessing for Vegetable Marrows, especially in a dry season. I have seen a cartload of manure used for a Marrow b...
-Chapter 29. Growing Some Minor Vegetables
There are certain vegetables which, the average Britisher either does not care for, or does not consider equal to his stock crops. Yet some of these minors of the kitchen garden are well worth growi...
-Chapter 30. Vegetables For Salads
The kitchen garden is incomplete without its provision for the salad bowl. Let us therefore glance at a few of the most important ingredients. Beetroot A few slices are indispensable. They must not ...
-Chapter 31. Growing Herbs
The herb border has its charms as well as its uses: it is usually a pleasant, aromatic spot, where one loves to linger. The complete herb garden will contain the following, and perhaps some others: An...
-Chapter 32. Exhibiting Vegetables
As rules for exhibiting gardens and allotments, and vegetables at shows are often asked for, I venture to give those drawn up and used by myself for several years under the competitions scheme of the ...









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