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Kung Fu, or Taoist Medical Gymnastics | by John Dudgeon



The Beverages of the Chinese; Kung-fu or Taoist Medical Gymnastics; the Population of China; A Modern Chinese Anatomist and A Chapter in Chinese Surgery.

TitleThe Beverages of the Chinese; Kung-fu or Tauist Medical Gymnastics; the Population of China; A Modern Chinese Anatomist and A Chapter in Chinese Surgery.
AuthorJohn Dudgeon
Publisher
Year1895
Copyright1895,
AmazonKung Fu, or Taoist Medical Gymnastics

By John Dudgeon, M.D., Cm., Professor Of Anatomy And Physiology, Imperial College (T'ung-Wen-Kuan), Peking.

Tientsin. The Tientsin Press.

-Tea
The first use of tea as a beverage in China dates from the commencement of the Sui dynasty (589 A.D.). Previous to this it appears to have been used as a medicine, and is said to be mentioned in...
-Tea. Part 2
In Kang-hi's Dictionary, it is said that everybody says that tea is the ancient t'u; but they do not know how many sorts there are of tea. The t'u of chia-k'u-t'u is the present tea. Sun says the t'u ...
-Tea. Part 3
Some medical men, however, at home are of opinion that a little tannin in our tea, as in our wines, may be a good tiling, as it restrains digestion and prevents our food passing out of the system too ...
-Tea. Part 4
Pen Ts'ao (a distinguished physician of the Sung; his work is a revised combination of the Great Herbal and the T'u Ching, it is said that tea boiled with vinegar was used in the cure of diarrhoea. ...
-Tea. Part 5
The sanitary and wholesome effects of tea upon the system cannot in truth be overlooked or disregarded. Much of the quiet life and domestic habits of the Chinese are to be traced to this beverage. The...
-Wines And Spirits
The Chinese, tor the last few thousand years, have had a wine; and, since the Mongol dynasty in the 13th century, when distillation became known to them, have possessed a spirit. Not a few of our sino...
-Wines And Spirits. Part 2
Wine (Tsiu). - People in the North call it Southern wine, also White wine. In the native place of the author (Poyang),it is called Water wine. The Herbal says: - The clear is called jang the turbid,...
-Wines And Spirits. Part 3
People with blood diseases, if they do not give up spirits, medicine has no effect upon them; and, if the bones be fractured and the flesh contused, and the man drink spirits, he is lost. If pregnant ...
-Wines And Spirits. Part 4
The Hsi Yu Grape Brandy. - If Chinese drink it, they must die. The Great Herbal strongly interdicts it. All sorts of Wine. - All wine moves the blood. The wine made of the Sweet Sorghum, and the pa...
-Wines And Spirits. Part 5
In the East of the Kiang provinces, included formerly in the Wu kingdom, there was a wild vine called ying-yu the grapes of which were small and sour. In the fermentation of wine, the chii is...
-Wines And Spirits. Part 6
I Tih is the reputed inventor, some 2,200 years B.C., of the use of wine in China. In spirit shops, we often observe the tablet with the woids - I Tih chih tsieu - The fine wine of I Tih. He is...
-Wines And Spirits. Part 7
The yellow wine of the South is made of Chiang-mi or glutinous rice, of which one may see dumplings with dates or sugar in them, covered with leaves, on the streets of the Capital, especially in ...
-Wines And Spirits. Part 8
The Chinese agricultural class drinks little; the merchant and literary classes are the chief drinkers. The very lowest class of the cities, a class without fixed occupation, drink heavily almost with...
-Wines And Spirits. Part 9
Comparisons between opium in the East and spirits-in the West have often been drawn to the disadvantage of the latter. The appalling scenes of drunkenness so-common to a European city are of the rares...
-Wines And Spirits. Part 10
This sad case illustrates the fallacy of supposing those who take to opium do not take to drink; and that, if the opium were prohibited, the drink curse would be introduced. A large per-centage of opi...
-Wines And Spirits. Part 11
The evil effects which are caused by indulgence in brandy, and of which the Chinese are sensible, are to be ascribed to the higher homologues of ethylic alcohol. To wine, manufactured by the addition ...
-Wines And Spirits. Part 12
Another point of some value is that, after the meal is finished, no more wine is served. This point is implied in the foregoing one; but, as it is so important and differs so widely from the usages of...
-Wines And Spirits. Part 13
The religions of Asia, - Buddhism, Hinduism, and Mohammedanism, - have certainly done much for the sobriety of the Asiatics. In India, where the consumption of alcoholic beverages is largely on the in...
-Wines And Spirits. Part 14
Officials from the North, proceeding to the South and there acquiring the opium habit, on their return often state that their reason for beginning it was the miasma of the South, which the people say ...
-Kung-Fu or Medical Gymnastics
Movements for the development of the body and for the prevention and cure of disease were known and practised in the most ancient times in all countries. We find gymnastic exercises forming a part of ...
-Kung-Fu or Medical Gymnastics. Part 2
But it is necessary to trace the rise of this subject in China somewhat more particularly. The first mention in Chinese history of a system of movements, proper to maintain health and cure disease,...
-Kung-Fu or Medical Gymnastics. Part 3
A medical man, who was lately asked if he used massage much in his practice, replied - Oh yes, a great deal; my butler does it. After that, one should not have been surprised to hear that the elect...
-Kung-Fu or Medical Gymnastics. Part 4
Pere Amiot, one of the Roman Catholic missionaries at Peking, drew attention to the subject of Kung-fu, or, as he spells it, Cong-Fou, by the publication of his Notice du Cong-Fou in 1779, in Les Memo...
-Kung-Fu or Medical Gymnastics. Part 5
His system resembles exactly that of the Kung-fu of the Tauists, and to M. Dally it appears less complex than that of the Tauists. The Chinese system, continues our author, is sanctioned by 5000 years...
-Kung-Fu or Medical Gymnastics. Part 6
The Tauists pretend, when they have gazed for a long time, first on one side then on the other, in regarding the root of the nose, that the torrent of thought is suspended, that a profound calm envelo...
-Kung-Fu or Medical Gymnastics. Part 7
It follows from this that the different postures of Kung-fu, well directed, ought to operate in a salutary disengagement in all the maladies which spring from an embarrassed, retarded, or even interru...
-Kung-Fu or Medical Gymnastics. Part 8
Such is the system of Kung-fu, and P. Amiot, says Dally, one of the most profound mathematicians of his time, has perfectly understood the grandeur of this system when he says that all the known postu...
-Kung-Fu or Medical Gymnastics. Part 9
The animal forces, locomotive or muscular, Yang, and the vegetative forces, secretory or chemical, Yin, are harmonised and held in equilibrium by the physical forces, T'ai-chi; and from this state of ...
-Kung-Fu or Medical Gymnastics. Part 10
We reserve for the conclusion of this Paper our own remarks and investigations into these principles and theories, and now hasten to place before the reader some of the various methods, active and pas...
-The Eight Ornamental Sections
This name has been handed down by the sages of antiquity, and hence the eight illustrations. The object aimed at is to prevent the entrance of demons and vicious air, to obtain clearness in dreams and...
-The Five Animals
These figures for the cure of disease by perspiration were designed by the celebrated surgeon Hwa-to, of the Han dynasty (2nd century A.D.), who is not only the Esculapius of China but was well versed...
-Kung-fu for the Four Seasons
In the year's exercises, we must omit all references to the time each day, which ranges from mid-night to 7 a.m., when they are enjoined; also the numerous correlations with pulses, blood-vessels, vis...
-Kung-fu for the Four Seasons. Part 2
4. - Middle of the Second Month, - termed the Spring Equinox. - Extend the hands, turn the head to the right and left 6x7 times, knock the teeth 6x6, inspire and swallow 3x3. To cure weakness and th...
-Kung-fu for the Four Seasons. Part 3
When the seven apertures of the heart are all open, the Chinese assert the highest intelligence. With a moderate amount of wisdom, only five openings are pervious; and, in the case of the intensely st...
-Kung-fu for the Four Seasons. Part 4
For the last half of the Sixth Month, the kung-fu is sit quite straight, extend the fingers upwards, bend them backwards, perform this 3 times, then bending them to the front in the same way in front ...
-Kung-fu for the Four Seasons. Part 5
The kidneys form the illustration at the beginning of the last three months of the year, which is as follows: - The name of its spirit is The Water Spirit, and its designation Nourishing Infants. ...
-The Leading Air Soup
Prescription. - Take of ts'ang-shu [or ts'ang-chu] Atractylis ovata; hsiang-fu Cyperus rotundus; ch'en-p'i orange peel; chw'an-hiung Pleurospermum Sp., or Conioselinum univitatum (umbelliferae); ...
-The Jujube Iron Pills
Prescription. - Take of green alum sulphate of iron? burnt, orange peel, ts'ang-shu, of each 2 ounces; sha-jen cardamoms, 3 mace; dried ginger, 2 mace; chih-ch'ioh, or chih-k'o Aegle sepiaria (la...
-The Protecting Harmony Pills
Prescription. - Take of shan-ch'a-jou fruit of Crataegus pinnatifida, 2 ounces; shen-ch'u (fried);pan-hsia tubers of Pinellia tuberifera (or rad. Ari macrori); ginger juice to be beaten with it; ...
-The Harmonizing Air Powder
Prescription. - Take of ma-hwang Ephedra vulgaris; orange peel; wu-yao Daphnidium myrrha; pai-chiang-ts'an chw'an-hiung, pai-chih, of each 1 mace; liquorice, chieh-keng Platycordon grandifl...
-The Salt Soup (Water) Method for bringing on Vomiting
Prescription. - Use very much salted water to cause vomiting and the affection is cured. This corresponds with Amiot's No. 19, which is there said to be against calculus and nephritic colic. No....
-Adding to the Taste of the White Tiger Soup
Prescription. - Take of gypsum (roasted) 2 candareens; chih-mu Anemorrhena asphodeloides, liquorice, of each 1 mace; pan-hsia 2 candareens; mai-tung tubers of Ophiopogon japonicus, 8 canda...
-The Bright Eye Flowing Air Potion
Prescription. - Tang-kwei Ligusticum acutilobum, pai-shaoPćonia albiflora, sheng-tiRehmannia glutinosa, lung-tan-ts'ao Gentiana scabra, ch'ai-hu Bupleurum falcatum, hwang-lien rhizome of Coptis ...
-The Moving Air Soup
Prescription. - Take of kau-pen Nothosmyrnium japonicum, fang-feng Peucedanum terebinthaceum (?), root of an umbellifera, chw'an-hiung, of each 1 mace; ch'iang--hwo Peucedanum decursivum, tu-hw...
-The Soup for widening the Middle (Thorax)
Prescription. - Take of tzu-su, keng-yeh Hemiptelea Davidi (Zelkora Davidi), cardamons, chih-ch'ioh, ch'ing-p'i immature fruits (dried) of a species of citrus, orange peel, betel-nut, mu-hsiang r...
-The Strong Spleen Pills
Prescription - Take of pai-shu (roasted with earth), chih-shih roasted, Aegle sepiaria (small fruit), orange peel, mai-ya roasted, sprouts of wheat and barley, shen-ch'u (roasted), shan-yao Dio...
-The Pain-removing Powder
Prescription. - Take of wu - ling-chih magpie's dung, p'u-hwangroasted, Typha sp., tang-kwei, of each 1 ounce;jou-kwei,Cinnamomum cassia, mu-hsiang,shih-ch'ang-p'u Acorus gramineus, of each 8 mac...
-The Gold-producing Tiger-bones Powder
Prescription. - Take of tang-kwei, ch'ih-shao Paeonia albiflora (the cultivated variety which bears red flowers), ch'wen-hsu-twan Dipsacus asper or Lamium album from Szechuan, pai-shu, kau-pen, t...
-The Extract of the Two Immortals, Kwei and Lu. (The Tortoise and Deer)
Prescription. - Take of deer horns 10 catties, shell of a land tortoise 5 catties, kow-ch'i-tse Lycium chinense, 30 ounces, ginseng 15 ounces. Use a jar and make it after the manner of an extract, ...
-The Powder for widening the Centre
Prescription. - Take of chi'h-ch'ioh ( roasted), chieh-keng, fu-ling, pan-hsia, orange peel, hou-p'o, hsiang-fu, sha-jen, - of each the same quantity. Add a few slices of ginger, and make a decoction....
-The Ginseng Harmonizing Air Powder
Prescription. - Take of chw'an-hiung, chieh-keng pai-chih, orange peel, chih-ch'ioh, liquorice, ma-hwang, wu-yao, ginseng, ch'iang-hwo, - of each 7 candareens. Make a decoction. No. 20. - The Maide...
-The Putchuck Flowing Air Potion
Prescription. - Take of pan-hsia, ch'ing-p'i, liquorice, o-shu Kampferia pandurata, betel-nut, hsiang-fu, ts'ao-kwoAmomus medium (Ovoid Chinese cardamom), pai-chih, mu-kwaChinese quince (Pyrus Ca...
-The Chrysanthemum Powder
Prescription. - Take of ch'iang-hwo, mu-tsei Equisetum japonicum, hwang-lien, chw'an-hiung, ching-chieh, Salvia plebeia, fang-feng, tang-kwei, pai-shao, liquorice, kan-chu-hua Chrysanthemum sinen...
-The Chrysanthemum Powder. Continued
To cure curvature of the lumbar spine and shaking ( palsy ) of the head. Stand firmly, bend the head, curve the lumbar spine, and perform the act of showing reverence. In doing this kung, let t...
-The Falling cup Soup
Prescription. - Take of Hsuen-hu-so tubers of Corydalis ambigua, wu-ling-chih (thoroughly roasted), chien-k'ow-jen nutmeg kernels from Fuhkien, of each 6 candareens; liang-chiang Galangal (alpin...
-The Powder for dispersing the Poison
Prescription. - Take of hwang-ch'in, hwang-lien, 1 rhubarb, pai-chih, ch'iang-hwo, fang-feng, chin-yin-hwa Lonicera japonica, lien-chi'oh (valves of fruit of Forsythia suspensa), tang-kwei, ching-...
-The Ch'iang-hwo Pai-chih Soup
Prescription. - Take of ch'ai-hu, fu-ling, fang-feng, ching-chieh, hwang-lien, tse-hsieh, tang-kwei, pai-shu, man-ching, gypsum, ts'ang-shu, hsin-i buds of Magnolia conspicua (or M. Kobus), sheng...
-The Nourishing - heart Soup
Prescription. - Take of ginseng, shan-yao, mu-t'ung, fu-shen, swan-tsao-jen seeds of Diospyros lotus, kwei-shen, clarified tang-kwei, pai-shao, yuen-chih flesh (pulp), lien-hsu [same as lien-jui...
-The Niu-hsi Wine
Prescription. - Take of ti-kuh-p'i, wu-chia-p'i Eleutherocrocus, i-i-jen seeds of Coix lachryma (roasted), chw'an-hiung, niu-hsi, of each 2 ounces; liquorice, sheng-ti, 3 ounces; hai-t'...
-The Flowing Air Potion
Prescription. - Take of ch'iang-hwo, ts'ang-shu, chw'an-hiung, tang-kwei, hsiang-fu, pai-shao, orange peel, pan-hsia, mu-hsiang, chih-ch'ioh, mu-t'ung, liquorice, betel-nut, tze-su, of each the same q...
-The Rhubarb Soup
Prescription. - Take of the best rhubarb, and digest it in wine 7 times; dry, and then powder. Use tea, and take 3 mace for a dose. No. 37. - The immortal Li Hung-chi admiring the Moon. - This ...
-Harmonizing the Air and Nourishing the Blood Soup
Prescription. - Take of tze-su (leaves of the stem), 1 mace, ch'iang-hwo, 1 mace; pan-hsia, tsang-pai-p'i root bark of the mulberry (Morus alba), ch'ing-p'i, orange peel, ta-fu-p'i same as betel-...
-The Tang-kwei Method of picking out Pain
Prescription. - Take of ch'iang-hwo, liquorice, hwang-ch'in (digested in wine), yin-ch'en Artemisia sp., roasted in wine, of each 5 mace; k'u-shen root of Sophora flavescens or gustifolia, k...
-The Soup for removing the Heat and overcoming the Damp
Prescription. - Take of hwang-p'o (moistened in salted water and afterwards roasted), ch'iang-hwo, tze-hsieh, ts'ang-shu, prepared liquorice (half the quantity of the other ingredients), tu-chung (roa...
-The Hai - t'ung - p'i Potion
Prescription. - Take hai-t'ung-p'i, wu-chia-p'i, chw'an-tu-hwo, chih-ch'ioh, fang-feng, tu-chung (roasted), niu-hsi (digested in wine), i-i-jen (roasted), of each 1 1/2 ounces. Put it into good wine, ...
-The Soup to cause the Blood-vessels to circulate
Prescription. - Take of hsuen-hu-so, tang-kwei, jou-kwei, of each 1 ounce; powder, mix with wine, and take 3 or 4 mace. Add wine according to each individual's wine capacity; when the pain ceases, cea...
-The Trinity or Three Harmonies Soup
Prescription. - Take of orange peel, pan-hsia, fu-ling, wu-yao, chih-ch'ioh, chw'an-hiung, pai-chih, ch'iang-hwo, fang-feng, hsiang-fu, of each the same quantity, and make a decoction. No. 43. - Ho...
-The Fragrant Sha Ling and P'i Potion
Prescription. - Take of fu-ling-p'i, ta-fu-p'i, wu-chia-p'i, ginger-skin, ts'ang-pai-p'i, root bark of mulberry, chih-ch'ioh, sha-jen, pai-chu, lo-fo-tse, mu-hsiang, mu-t'ung, tse-hsi'eh, chu-ling, of...
-The Yellow Wax Pills
Prescription. - Take of yellow wax 1 ounce; almonds 49, digested in water to strip off the skin and the point (the latter supposed to be poisonous); mu-hsiang, 5 mace; 7 croton seeds, Croton Tiglium (...
-The Pai Shao Yao Soup
Prescription. - Take of pai-shao, tang-kwei, of each 1 mace; rhubarb 2 mace, mu-hsiang 5 candareens, hwang-lien 1 mace; hwang-ch'in, betel-nut, of each 8 candareens; liquorice 7 candareens. For one do...
-The Soup of the Two Oranges
Prescription. - Take of chih-so ( same as so-sha-mi ), Amomum villosum, pan-hsia, orange peel, chih-shih, sha-jen, hsiang-fu, mu-hsiang, hou-p'o, hwei-hsiang, hsuan-hu, ts'ao-tou-k'ou tze-su (ste...
-Hwei - hsiang Pills
Prescription. - Take fu-ling, pai-chu, shan-cha, of each 1 ounce; chih-shih mace, ta-hwei-hsiang (roasted) 1 ounce, wu-chu-yu roasted 1 ounce, orange seed (roasted) 2 ounces, stones of the Lichee...
-Method of brightening the Vision
* The Partiarch of P'eng is a mythical being, who is reputed to have attained a fabulous longevity. He was 767 years of age when the Yin dynasty came to an end (1123 B.C.). He is said to have nour...
-Extra Curative Kung without Prescriptions
In a work copiously and beautifully illustrated on Kung-fu, which apparently has been abstracted from my library but of which I made a translation and had the most striking illustrations copied and cu...
-The Dragon Series
The Dragon is the chief among the four divinely constituted beasts, a legendary monster depicted by Chinese tradition as a four-footed reptile resembling a huge saurian. The watery principle of the at...
-Kneading Method Of Cure And Prevention Of Disease
Under this title we include all forms of friction, pressing, rubbing, shampooing, massage, pinching etc. This method of cure and prevention of disease is of very ancient origin. It has been revived in...
-The Pressing and Rubbing Method of Lau-tse (Tauist)
Press down heavily on the thigh with the hands on each side and twist the body twice seven times. Press the thigh with the hands on each side and twist the shoulder twice seven times Embrace the head ...
-Books on Kung-fu
The Tauist work Tsun-sheng-pa-chien in 20 books was written by Kau-lien-shen-fu in 1591. The first and third prefaces are by the author the second by Ch'ai-ying-nan The work is divided into eight ...
-Books on Kung-fu. Part 2
Another work in one small vol., one of the smallest, cheapest and most popular books on Kung-fu, is the Wei-sheng-yi-chin-ching supposed to be spurious by scholars. Several abridged editions of t...
-Books on Kung-fu. Part 3
The succeeding preface appears in the section entitled Physiology of Kung-fu. The concluding preface is by one Niu-kau, a military officer, of the Sung dynasty in the 12th year of Shao-hsing the first...
-Kneading
The idea of kneading is rubbing or shampooing the sinews and bones strong. It consists of three portions, each of 100 days. (1). - Kneading in season. Beginning in spring when the weather is still ...
-Method For Acquiring The Essences Of The Sun And Moon
(The important thing is to have the lungs full of air). The two-essences of the Sun and Moon must unite to produce the myriad things of nature. The ancients swallowed these essences and in time became...
-Method For Acquiring The Essences Of The Sun And Moon. Part 2
At this period there is no scattering of the thoughts, and the kneading is equalized. If this condition is attained, one can sleep during the process and the method is all the more remarkable; the sh...
-Method For Acquiring The Essences Of The Sun And Moon. Part 3
We have omitted here several sections, partly as unimportant but chiefly as being quite unfit for publication. One is entitled the Method of Pairing the Yin and Yang principles. Another is called the ...
-The Eighteen Disciplinary Records
The Method of Rubbing the Shoulder and Wrist. - On the completion of the kung, first stretch out the left arm and let another lift up with both hands the tiger's mouth, (the space between the thumb...
-Kung-fu Divisions under the External Method
Kung-fu for the Heart While performing the exercise must first rest the mind, cease from all thought, banish all grief, anger and suchlike and give up all the animal propensities, in order to keep ...
-Kung-fu Divisions under the External Method. Continued
Nose 1. - Rub the thumbs of the two hands until they become hot, then rub the nose with them 36 times, to moisten the lungs. 2. - Let the eyes look at the point of the nose and then breathe silentl...
-The Twelve Positions. Aspects of Wei-to
1. - The First Aspect of Wei-to (a Deva or inhabitant of heaven, a deity of Hindoo mythology who protects the Buddhist religion, and three of the four continents into which the world is divided. It is...
-The Twelve Positions. Aspects of Wei-to. Part 2
12. - Wagging the Tail. With upright legs and outstretched arms. Pushing the hands to the ground. Fix the eyes and raise the head. Settle the thoughts and think of nothing else. ...
-The Twelve Positions. Aspects of Wei-to. 11 Rules For The Regulation Of This Art
The following eleven rules are laid down for the regulation of this art. 1. - To swallow or gulp breath is of the first importance in the due performance of kung-fu. Gulping breath (air) is differe...
-Description of Diagrams
The Level Frame - There are four horse-riding forms under this position. 1. - Standing evenly and uprightly, separate the feet the width of the shoulders apart and keep the palms upward on t...
-Description of Diagrams. Part 2
The Brushing-face position There are two forms under this position. 1. - Keep the palms of the hands close together in front on a level with the chin, the two little fingers and elbows appl...
-Description of Diagrams. Part 3
The Chan-hsiao position Four forms are given under this position; the first two are termed the cannon of the den; the third the cannon rushing against the sky' and the fourth the cannon pas...
-Physiology of Kung-fu
The general principles of this art may be briefly and clearly expressed in the following quotation from one of their numerous works on the subject, and from one of the prefaces written in commendation...
-Physiology of Kung-fu. Part 2
* NOTE. - The 7 Ching are the following, - joy injures the heart; anger the liver; grief the lungs; doubt, the spleen; fear, kidneys; anxiety, the gall bladder; and sadness and crying, the spirit of t...
-Physiology of Kung-fu. Part 3
Tan chung chen hwo shang sheng, the true fire in the tan t'ien poceeds upwards. It was intended in the sequel to describe the shampooing, rubbing, pressing and other processes, of the frate...
-The End On The Population Of China
Memorial presented by the officials of the Board of Revenue regarding the Population and Storage of Rice for the 12th year of Kwanghsu (1886 ): - Your Servants find that during the 5th year of Kien...
-The End On The Population Of China. Part 2
Ch'ing kiang etc. of the 9th year of Hienfeng (1860) and the quantity of rice of these 50 t'ing, chow and hsien viz. Kau an etc., of the 8th year of Hienfeng (1859) and the quantity of rice of thes...
-The End On The Population Of China. Part 3
No records have as vet been received from the above by your Servants'Board and your ServantsBoard has been sending despatches every year to the Governors-General and Governors urging them to forward ...
-The End On The Population Of China. Part 4
The Province of Chehkiang It is stated in the record by the Governor that this province contains 11 fu 1 chow, 75 hsien and 2 t'ing. Its real population is 11,691,255 which, compared with that of t...
-The End On The Population Of China. Part 5
Conclusion The population of the above 13 provinces, viz. Fengtien, Shantung, Shansi. Honan, Kiangsu, Kiangsi, Chehkiang; Hupei, Hunan, Shensi, Szechwen, Kwangtung and Kweiehow and the places which...
-A Modern Chinese Anatomist
Wang Ch'ing-jen , a native of U-t'ien-hsienabout 200 li (70 miles) to the east of Peking, published a book called I-lin-kai-tso in the 29th year of the reign Tao Kwang(1850). The work is in...
-A Modern Chinese Anatomist. Part 2
The two kidneys have one body and what reason is there for giving them two different names. If the moving air is the gate of life what is its nature? This is the mistake in regaid to the kidneys. The ...
-A Modern Chinese Anatomist. Part 3
Of nine or ten who took ill at least eight or nine died. The poor people wrapped up the bodies in mats and buried them quite superficially, according to the custom of the place in order that the dogs ...
-A Modern Chinese Anatomist. Part 4
To understand the viscera and their structure it is first necessary to know inspiration, expiration and the alimentary canal. The ancients called the part behind the tongue the horc larynx because ...
-A Modern Chinese Anatomist. Part 5
From the wei-tsung vessel at the back of the heart are two vessels, like a tendon in size, which go to the two shoulders (the subclavian arteries); opposite the lumbar region there are also two vessel...
-A Modern Chinese Anatomist. Part 6
* The Chinese medical works do not acknowledge the existence of the pancreas as a viscus and on account of its absence our European physicians in their translations have taken the term By the w...
-Discourse on the Brain Marrow
Man's power of contrivance and memory lie not in the heart but in the brain. I have no wish to assert this doctrine and even if I do I know that nobody will believe me. If I do not, however, speak the...
-Discourse on the Air, Blood and Pulse
In regard to the nature of the pulse, what I inform posterity is the truth; if there are those who speak or write not according to what they know, or believe and assert themselves to be genii and do n...
-Discourse on the absence of Blood in the Heart
I have a friend called Hsieuh Wen-hwang whose designation is Lang Chaia native of T'ung-chow, who has also studied medicine. Before proceeding to Shantung in the 2nd moon of the 10th year of Tao...
-Discourse on the absence of Blood in the Heart. Part 2
According to the ancients the lungs have six lobes and two small ears or lobules, in all eight; that the large intestines have the lan-men (ileo cćcal valve) above and the hang-men (anus) below; that ...
-Discourse on the absence of Blood in the Heart. Part 3
The ancients said that the ching-lo were blood vessels, that in the outside of each viscus there were two roots; except the bladder which had four branches. I saw in the course of my examinations over...
-Discourse on the absence of Blood in the Heart. Part 4
The right and left air doors are, as already stated, the common carotid arteries supposed by our author to be air vessels; the epiglottis is said to cover the two doors and also the how door, which is...
-Chinese Surgery
The Golden Mirror of Medicine describes briefly eight manual methods for the treatment of fractures of the bones, injury to the sinews, dislocations, etc. These are the moh or feeling method, the ...









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