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The Home Cyclopedia Of Health And Medicine | by Henry Hartshorne



A household guide for the preservation of health, for the care of the sick, for recognizing different diseases, and for prescribing the simplest and best remedies - what to do in accidents, poisoning and emergency cases - directions for assisting the skillful efforts of the doctor. An invaluable aid in the sick room.

TitleThe Home Cyclopedia Of Health And Medicine
AuthorHenry Hartshorne
PublisherW. E. Scull
Year1902
Copyright1902, W. E. Scull
AmazonHome Cyclopedia of Necessary Knowledge

Book V

The Home Cyclopedia Of Health And Medicine

By Henry Hartshorne, M. D.

Formerly Professor of Hygiene in the University of Pennsylvania, and Professor of Physiology and Diseases of Children in Women's Medical College of Pennsylvania; Author of " Our Homes." " Essentials of Practical Medicine," Etc., Etc. Editor of The American edition of "Reynolds' System of Medicine."

-What Is Disease
It was a rather strange idea of a recent distinguished writer upon Hygiene, that perhaps, if we understood perfectly all the laws of health, and obeyed them all, life might be indefinitely prolonged. ...
-Causes of Disease
These may be stated together, thus : as causes which are Hereditary : examples (though not always inherited), consumption, gout, epilepsy, cancer. Functional: that is, depending upon the action, eit...
-Anatomy
ORGANS OF THE CHEST AND ABDOMEN. L Aorta. 5. Left Subclavian Artery. H. Heart. C.C.C. Colon. 2. Pulmonary Artery. 6. Vena Cava. T. Larynx. 8. Stomach. 3 Innominate Artery. 7. Lett Vena Innominat...
-Hereditary Disease
We often see consumption affecting several members of the same family through several generations. The same is true of insanity. Gout is many times transmitted from father to son, but seldom to a thir...
-Functional Causation
Over-exertion may produce exhaustion, which, in a person before feeble, may end in death. Or, short of this, there may be brought on a state of weakness slow to be recovered from. In such a state, mor...
-Mechanical Injuries
Broken limbs, displaced joints, and wounds, are often causes of disease. Tight-lacing is also a mechanical cause of interruption to the right action of the lungs and heart, crowding these and other or...
-Conditional Causes
By these we mean high heat, great cold, dampness, sudden changes and partial exposures of the body to either extreme, or electrical influences; these last being very little understood. Sunstroke is a...
-Digestive Morbid Causes
Excess of food may cause indigestion at the time; and, if often repeated, habitual indigestion - called dyspepsia. A less amount of excess or superfluity may bring on an overfulness of rich blood in t...
-Obstructive Causes
Everything that interferes with the clearing out from the body of all waste and dead material, by the excretions, tends to injure health. Breathing foul air, makes the blood impure, and promotes disea...
-Contagion
This is, strictly defined, conveyance of disease by touch or contact. But some (not all) disorders, which may be transit mitted by actual touch, pass also to a short distance through the air. This is ...
-Infection: Atmospheric Causation
Certain places, at particular times, are infected with maladies which attack a greater or less number of those living or visiting there. Some of these diseases are said to be endemic ; that is, they a...
-Nature Of Diseases
Children sometimes die of old age. That is, their original endowment of life energy was so small as to be exhausted during infancy. Others die very soon because of some defective development of a vita...
-Local Disorders
Medical books speak of irritation, congestion {hyperaemia), inflammation, mortification, and degeneration, as affections of organs of the body, Atrophy, hypertrophy, and morbid growths are such also ;...
-Irritation
An eye is irritated when a spark from a locomotive, or a bit of sand, or an inverted eyelash, get into it. A mustard-plaster first stimulates the circulation of the skin where it is applied ; this may...
-Congestion (or Hyperaemia)
This may be an active flowing of more blood than common through a part, or a passive collection of blood in the part. Stimulation produces the former; when it passes beyond the line of health into irr...
-Inflammation
All the world knows when a hand, a foot, or an eye is inflamed. Proverbially, the signs of this are redness, heat, pain, and swelling. The redness is owing to the excess of blood ; the heat to the sam...
-Hypertrophy or Overgrowth
Overgrowth is the meaning of this word ; increase in size without essential change in the nature of a part. An organ may enlarge very much, with a great change in its character ; for example, a tumor ...
-Atrophy and Degeneration
Atrophy is the opposite to hypertrophy. Want of blood or of the supply of nervous energy will cause an organ to shrink away. So a palsied hand often, in time, withers to half its original size. Atroph...
-Dropsy
Seldom does an accumulation of water occur in one part of the body without some previous general disorder of the system, or at least an affection of some of the great organs: the heart, liver, or kidn...
-Mortification
When a part, as a toe, a whole foot, leg, or arm dies, while the rest of the body lives, it is said to mortify, slough, or suffer gangrene. Once in a while the feet of an old person may undergo slow a...
-Morbid Growths
Warts, corns, bunions, wens, moles, bony enlargements, fibrous and fatty tumors, are all unsightly, and the last named may be considerably inconvenient. But they do not of themselves tend to undergo s...
-General Disorders
We may name these as debility, anaemia, plethora, cochexio,neuratoxia, toxaemia, and fever. ...
-Debility
One is apt to feel weak, when anything whatever is the matter. This may arise from loss of blood, from excessive fatigue, from continued illness, or from a severe shock to the system from any cause. E...
-Anaemia and Plethora
Poverty of blood may result from various diseases, or from loss of blood, too long nursing, etc. Weakness accompanies it, of the kind above called exhaustion. An anaemic person is usually pale (though...
-Cachexia or Diathesis
By this is meant some abnormal condition of the constitution. Leukaemia (or leucocythaemia) is a disease in which there is an excess of white or colorless corpuscles in the blood. Another cachexia i...
-Toxaemia: Blood-Poisoning
Blood-poisoning can never be a trifling thing. We should be in deadly danger of it every day, but that so much is arranged in our bodies not only to prevent it, but to relieve it promptly when it begi...
-Fevers
When one has a hot, dry skin, a glowing red cheek, thirst, a rapid pulse, and weakness of body, with more or less dulness or disturbance of the mental faculties, we say he has fever. Constipation of t...
-Classification Of Diseases
Various plans of arrangement have been proposed, and are in use. I prefer to name all diseases as either Inflammations and ToxaEmic disorders, Cachectic affections, Nervous disorders, or Unclassifiabl...
-Signs and Symptoms of Diseases
On approaching a sick person, our first question, whether put into words or not, is naturally, Is there much the matter? Other inquiries follow, such as these: Has he fever Is he very weak? Is his he...
-Symptoms Affecting the Skin
The skin is hot and dry in fever. Moisture is nearly always a favorable sign. Exceptions are, the cold and clammy perspiration of great prostration, and the copious sweating of advanced consumption. ...
-The Throat
Difficulty of swallowing may result from inflammation of the tonsils or gullet (pharynx); spasmodic closure of the throat; permanent narrowing or stricture of the pharynx or lower gullet (oesophagus);...
-The Stomach
Appetite is almost always deficient in both acute and chronic disease; most so, however, in the former, as a rule. Perverted appetite occurs in case of chlorosis, and in some hysterical subjects. Nau...
-Symptoms Belonging to the Circulation
Palpitation, or disturbed action of the heart, may depend upon inflammation of its membranes (pericarditis, endocarditis), enlargement (hypertrophy or dilatation), valvular disease, anaemia, with weak...
-Hemorrhages
While bleeding from any part of the body is often an important symptom, it needs to be interpreted with care. Its consequence depends greatly on its quantity and the source from which the blood comes....
-Symptoms Connected with the Breathing Organs
Sixteen to eighteen times in a minute is the ordinary rate of breathing while at rest, in health, for a grown person. la. fever it is almost always a good deal faster than this; often thirty, forty, o...
-Symptoms Affecting the Muscles
Position is often significant in disease. Inability to rise may be owing to general weakness, palsy, inflammation of the joints, etc.) as from rheumatism or gout), or an injury, such as a broken thigh...
-Symptoms Connected with our Senses
Pain is variously interpreted, according to its place and character. It may be Acute, sharp, cutting, as in pleurisy; shooting, darting, as in neuralgia; piercing (lancinating), in cancer; gnawing, t...
-The Eye in Disease
Blood-shot eyes show either inflammation of them or fulness of blood in the head, which is often present in fevers. If one eye only is very red, of course the trouble must be in itself. Yellowness of ...
-The Ears
Pain in one of the ears, earache, may be either inflammatory or neuralgic. Other signs must be considered along with it to show which it is. Ringing in the ears occurs from either of at least two or ...
-Headache
Pain in the head may depend in different cases upon neuralgia, rheumatism, overfulness of blood {congestion hyperaemia); blood-poisoning (as by alcohol, opium, etc.); fever (remittent, typhoid, etc.);...
-Expression of the Face
Acute disease is apt to alter this more than that which is chronic ; but it is often changed in both. An anxious or distressed expression giving way to serenity is always a good sign, unless it be the...
-Delirium
This is a disorder or confusion of mind, in acute disease, not fixed for a long time like insanity, but depending upon a temporary cause. It is present in many attacks of maladies attended by fever ; ...
-Stupor
Coma is the medical word for this. It is an unnaturally deep sleep, from which one cannot be roused. We meet with it chiefly in the following : Alcoholic drunkenness ('dead drunk); opium-poisoning (n...
-Symptoms Affecting the Secretions: The Bowels
Constipation (tightness of the bowels ; absence or rarity of movement, and small-ness of amount discharged) is almost always present during the first days of a fever, of any kind except typhoid. Even ...
-Excretion of the Kidneys
Symptoms connected with this excretion are: strangury (difficult urination), incontinence of urine (want of control, especially during sleep), retention, suppression, and excess of the secretion {diab...
-Qualities of the Urine
About forty, or from thirty to fifty, fluid ounces (a quart, more or less) of urine is passed by a healthy grown person every twenty-four hours. It may be retained longer in the female than in the mal...
-Perspiration
Besides deficiency and excess in this important secretion of the skin, it is a familiar fact that it has, in some persons, a very unpleasant odor, especially in the arm-pits and about the feet. Perhap...
-Remedies And Their Application
Do doctors, properly speaking, cure the diseases and injuries of their patients ? Yes, and no. Cure comes from a Latin word meaning care; to take care of something or somebody. That a good physician w...
-To Relieve Pain
Much depends on where the pain is, and of what sort. Annodynes are medicines whose action is to quell pain, by their influence upon the brain or nerves. But we do not nearly always have to resort to t...
-Remedy for Pain in Abdomen
A safe and often very useful remedy for pain in the abdomen, or, indeed, anywhere else, is the outward application of a mustard-plaster. When doubtful what else to do, try that. Properly used, it can ...
-Other Seats of Pain
Pain in the head is of several kinds, and dependent on several causes. Very seldom are anodynes suitable as remedies for headache, because they all act more or less powerfully on the brain, and so, ma...
-Composing Nervous Disturbance
What this requires depends very greatly on the cause and nature of the trouble. For infants, as well as older persons, nervous disturbance may vary all the way from slight fidgeting to fits or convuls...
-Promotion of Sleep
When sleeplessness comes as one of the symptoms of a disease, it may not have to be dealt with by itself, at least with medicine, unless it be more prolonged and distressing than usual. In every case ...
-Purgative Medicines
A large number of drugs act upon the bowels; cathartics is a technical name for these. Only a few of them need to be considered in connection with our present plan. Rhubarb is adapted to a greater va...
-Continued Weak Digestion
The class of medicines which particularly tone up a weak and relaxed stomach are the simple vegetable bitters. Such are quassia, columbo, gentian, and some others. Simple bitters we call these, becaus...
-To Reduce Inflammation
A serious task, this is, in many instances; taxing the doctor's skill, and not very rarely baffling him. How, then, can one say anything about it in a work on Home Medicine ? A few clear principles se...
-Means Used In Reducing Inflammation
For this purpose, the means available in different eases are, chiefly, these: Rest; Position; Cold; Diet; Purgation ; Blood-letting; Cooling' Medicines ; Nervous Sedatives; Counter irritation. REST ...
-Cooling or Sedative Medicines
Cooling (sedative) medicines are in place chiefly in inflammatory affections of the breathing organs, as pneumonia, bronchitis, and pleurisy. Tartar emetic Is the most powerful of these. Once it was v...
-Fever
Reminding the reader of what was said, a few pages back, of the nature and signs of fever, it may be said now, that what we want to do when those signs {heat, excitement of the circulation, locking up...
-Fever. Continued
Fever: Dryness of Skin Dryness of the skin is a regular symptom of fever. The most frequent exception to it is in the febrile state of inflammatory rheumatism; in which the skin, while hot, is someti...
-Cough
How many different kinds and cases of cough there are, we have already mentioned when considering it among the symptoms of disease. It cannot be treated exactly alike under all these different circums...
-Hemorrhage
What causes bleeding must always be the first question. If it is a symptom of a disease, the necessity of treating the disease rather than the bleeding is plain. In such a case, only a large and weake...
-Bleeding in the Mouth
When a tooth has been pulled, or in an infant, the gums have been freely lanced, sometimes considerable bleeding will occur. If from a tooth, a plug of cotton may be dipped in creosote, or tincture of...
-Spitting of Blood
Is it from the lungs, or from the throat, mouth, or nostrils 32 R Not unfrequently, bleeding from the nose goes' backwards, into the throat, and the blood, then hawked up, is naturally imagined to co...
-Intestinal Bleeding
For hemorrhage from the bowels, the same kind of management-is applicable as that appropriate when blood is thrown up from the stomach ; as just described. Bleeding piles (hemorrhoids) are, of course...
-Monthly Irregularities
For delayed monthly courses it is desirable to produce a determination of blood towards the lower part of the abdomen. Hot foot-baths, and warm hip- or sitting-baths, are the most effective means for ...
-Classes of Dropsy
For our purpose, in this place, it may be said that there are three classes of dropsical troubles : general dropsy {anasarca), superficial local dropsy {aedema), and local in-ternal dropsies. After sc...
-Prostation. Debility
We have seen already that there is more than one kind of weakness from disease. There may be oppression, as in the early stage of almost any acute disorder; or depression (prostration) from a great sh...
-Remedies for Special Diseases
We have very few real and certian specifics for the cure of particular diseases. The great boast of the medical profession is of its power to stop chills and fever and control other kinds of malari...
-Principal Medicines And Other Remedies
For the reader's convenience, we will now give a brief account of the principal medicine in general use likely to be particularly mentioned in the following, pages. As they are ahlphabetically arrange...
-Acetate Of Ammonium Solution
This is a mild, moderately cooling medicine, very suitable to promote perspiration during fever. It is easily made by dropping small pieces of Carbonate of Ammonium into good Vinegar, piece after piec...
-Aconite
Tincture of the Root of the Monkshood or Aconite plant. A deadly sedative poison in any but very small doses. It acts mainly on the nervous system, but indirectly on the circulation. Some physicians u...
-Aloes
A powerful purgative medicine, having a particular tendency to act on the lower bowel. Therefore it is not a suitable cathartic in cases of Piles. Yet, in a very small, not purgative, dose, it is some...
-Alum
A mineral called a salt by chemists. It contains either Ammonium or Potassium with Aluminium and Sulpuric acid in combination. (There is also an Iron Alum, in which, likewise, Ammonium is present.) It...
-Ammonia
Volatile Alkali and Hartshorn are other names for this substance. When pure, it is a gas ; but it is used either in the form of the Solid Carbonate of Am-monium, or in solution in Water (Aqua Ammonia)...
-Arnica
The tincture of the flowers (or of the whole plant) is a popular application for bruises and sprains. It is a warming application, and not suitable where the skin is broken. Being poisonous when swall...
-Arsenic
A metal whose compounds are poisonous. The medical form in which arsenic is generally prescribed by physicians is the solution of arsenite of potassium (Fowler's solution). Dose, from three to ten dro...
-Assafaetida
A gum-resin, of very disagreeable odor and taste; a good, mild, and safe composing medicine for disturbed nerves and to induce sleep. Assafaetida pills, of three grains each, may be given now and then...
-Baths
treatment of disease, the kinds of baths most used are the warm and the hot bath. We may call it warm from 900 to 960 Fahr., and hot from 960 to 100. It never need be hotter than this last figure...
-Medicated Baths
Hot and warm springs, as those of Virginia, are medicated by the sulphurous and other contents of the waters. Sometimes they do much good (bathing in the waters) for chronic troubles of the liver, kid...
-Belladonna
This product of the deadly nightshade (atropa belladonna) is a powerful narcotic or brain stimulant drug. The extract of the leaves is most used by physicians as a medicine, in neuralgia, etc. Atropia...
-Benzoin
A resinous substance, from the styrax, an East Indian tree. The compound tincture of Benzoin is a good medicine for bronchial cough. Dose, fifteen to twenty drops, on a lump of sugar, every three or f...
-Bismuth Subnitrate
A soothing stomachic medicine. Dose, two to five grains. ...
-Blackberry Root
Country people generally know the astringent property of this ; THE FAM1LY DOCTOR 39 but some make a mistake in supposing the berries to have the same; which they do not. A tea made by cutting up a h...
-Blisters
We use mustard-plasters not to blister, but only strongly to warm and stimulate the skin. For raising a blister, cantharides is mostly resorted to. The oldest way is to spread the ointment of canthari...
-Borax
A very familiar article this is, in the nursery, for sore mouth. It is a mineral astringent, milder than alum, and may be used more freely ; either dissolved in water as a wash, or in powder with suga...
-Cajuput Oil
An aromatic greenish (or, when old, reddish) oil, from the leaves of an East Indian tree; one of the best remedies for flatulent colic, especially when gouty; and also for flying gout and chronic rh...
-Calomel
Chloride of mercury. See above, under blue pill. Calomel is a white powder. Dose, from one-twelfth of a grain, for an infant, to one-half grain, one grain, or sometimes possibly more, for an adult. No...
-Camphor
A most useful gum, from evergreen tree native to the south and east of Asia. Everyone knows its white or colorless transparency, its peculiar odor, and pungent and yet cooling taste. It is volatile; t...
-Carbolic Acid
This has no proper place as a domestic medicine. It has had great popularity as a disinfectant; more than it deserves, in comparison with several other less unpleasant things. Surgeons often employ it...
-Castor-Oil
Expressed from the beans of the palma christi, a handsome plant, originally from Asia. It is nasty, decidedly; but is a good, effective, and yet mild purgative medicine. It is the best cathartic, even...
-Catechu
An extract from the wood of an oriental tree. It is astringent, and is very useful in diarrhaea. Tincture of catechu is the best preparation. Dose, half a tea-spoonful to a teaspoonful, in water. An e...
-Cerate
This word means something made with wax. Simple cerate is made of spermaceti, white wax, and oil of almonds. It is a very soothing and healing application to sore places of any kind, as after a bliste...
-Chalk Mixture
A convenient medicine for common diarrhoea, made of prepared chalk, gum-arabic, glycerine, and cinnamon water. Dose, a tablespoonful for a grown person. Most frequently something is added to make it m...
-Chamomile
This is a plant with bitter and aromatic flowers. Of these a tea is made with boiling water. It may be taken, half a pint daily, as a simple appetizer and tonic in weak digestion or general want of st...
-Charcoal
Powdered charcoal is a good sweetener of a stomach oppressed with flatulence from indigestion. Dose, half a teaspoonful to a teaspoonful. It is often given with an equal quantity of magnesia. V...
-Chloral (Cholral Hydrate)
One of the medicines that promote sleep. It is less powerful than opium, although a very large amount of it taken will poison fatally. It is a white crystalline substance, of a pungent taste and color...
-Chloroform
The most prompt and powerful, but also least safe, of the articles used by surgeons as anaesthetics; that is, for patients to breathe before and during operations, in order to prevent them from suffer...
-Cinnamon Water
Made from the aromatic bark of the cinnamon tree of the East. It is a pleasant spicy solution, slightly astringent; good with other things in mixtures for diarrhoea. Dose, for a child, a teaspoonful. ...
-Citrate Of Magnesium
Commonly taken in effervescent solution. It is about the least disagreeable of all purgative medicines. Apothecaries mostly keep it already dissolved, in tightly corked and wired bottles. More conveni...
-Citrate Of Potassium
Like the citrate just mentioned, this has for one ingredient citric acid, obtained from lemon or lime-juice. This is neutralized by potassium (an alkaline metal) as it may be also by magnesium ; in ea...
-Cocoa Butter
Cocoa butter is a good soothing application for bruises of any part of the body. It is well always to have it in the house. ...
-Cod-Liver Oil
Obtained, as its name indicates, from the livers of codfish. It is very nourishing and fattening to wasted and wasting bodies, sometimes checking the progress even of pulmonary consumption. Its taste ...
-Colchicum
A plant whose root and seeds are both used medicinally. The wine of the root is the best preparation. In large dose it acts on the bowels ; sometimes irritating the stomach also. It is a diuretic, and...
-Cold Cream
This is the unguentum aquae rosoe (ointment of rose-water) of the apothecaries. It is a soft, easily melted, and very soothing application for sore places, chapped hands or lips, etc It becomes rancid...
-Collodion
This is a solution of gun-cocton in ether. When it is painted upon 506 any surface the ether evaporates, leaving a thin cottony film. Flexible collodion, made a little differently, is less apt to shri...
-Columbo
(Calumba, root of an African plant) is one of the simple vegetable bitters. Like the rest of its class, it is a tonic to the stomach. It is given sometimes for dyspepsia. ...
-Cream Of Tartar (Bitartrate Of Potas-Sium
This is a cooling, mild purgative salt, which also increases the flow of urine (diuretic). It is very often given in dropsy. Dose, one or two teaspoonfuls, stirred in water. Very little of it will dis...
-Creosote
A product of tar. A hot-tasting, sooty-smelling liquid ; poisonous if swallowed in moderately large quantity; burning the mouth or skin which it touches. Physicians advise it in one-drop doses for s...
-Digitalis
Foxglove is the common name of the pretty plant whose leaves furnish this medicine. The tincture is most used. Physicians give it often when the action of the heart is too rapid, and perhaps irregular...
-Dover's Powder
Made of ipecacuanha, opium, and a cooling salt (sulphate of potassium, or some similar compound), this medicine is composing and diaphoretic. Some persons find it agree with them at the beginning of a...
-Effervescing Draught
This is a cooling medicine for fever; the carbolic acid gas in it also makes it acceptable to the stomach. It is composed on the following recipe: Dissolve two drachms and a half of bicarbonate of po...
-Electricity
Physicians often advise (or themselves personally apply) different forms of electricity for the treatment especially of paralysis; also, for neuralgia, chronic rheumatism, old sprains, suppressed mens...
-Elixir Of Vitriol
Aromatic sulphuric acid is another name for this, which is often prescribed as an appetizer; sometimes also for diarrhoea, and occasionally for hemorrhages. Dose, ten to fifteen drops, in water; best ...
-Emetics
Articles which cause vomiting. The most important occasion for their use is when poison is known to have been swallowed. Then the quicker and the more thoroughly the stomach is emptied, the better. H...
-Epsom Salts
Sulphate of Magnesium, A very unpleasant medicine to the taste; an active, cooling cathartic. It is (its nastiness apart) useful as a purgative in some inflammatory affections of strong people; for de...
-Eucalyptus
From the leaves of this Australian tree a tincture is made, as well as a solid extract, and the essential oil, euca-lyptol. Lozenges of this drug are serviceable as a warming expectorant, in bronchial...
-Fennel-Seed
A very mild aromatic; sometimes made into a tea for babies' colic ; more often added to senna tea, Or fluid extract of senna, to keep the purgative medicine from griping the bowels. ...
-Flaxseed
This makes a good soothing drink, flaxseed tea, for sore throat. Pour half a pint of boiling water upon a table-spoonful of whole flaxseed, and stir it up for a few minutes. Then let it stand covered ...
-Fly-Blister
A plaster of the ointment of Spanish flies (cantharides), applied to draw a blister upon some part of the surface of the body. Such a remedy is only required for a rather severe case of internal infla...
-Gentian
A flowering plant, whose root is used in medicine. Its extract is made into tonic pills (compound gentian pills) for indigestion, and its compound tincture is one of the best tonic preparations given ...
-Geranium
This plant has an astringent root, of which a tea may be made by boiling an ounce (about two tablespoonfuls) in a pint and a half of water down to a pint. Of this the dose is from a tablespoonful to a...
-Ginger
A fine spice for culinary as well as medicinal use. Jamaica ginger is the most used with us. Essence of ginger is a very good medicine to have in the house. It is a warming stimulant to the stomach, a...
-Glycerine
A sweet, transparent liquid, obtained from fatty substances. Only pure glycerine (Bower's or Price's) should be used. Its principal employment is as an external application; to chapped hands, ears, li...
-Gum-Arabic
A soothing (not nourishing) material for a drink, in cases of irritation of the throat, or cough. It is simply dissolved in water, a tablespoonful to a half pint. Some persons like to chew and dissolv...
-Hoffmann's Anodyne
A strong warming stimulant to the nervous system, with some anodyne or pain-relieving power. It is useful in attacks of gout in the stomach or heart, palpitation from or with weakness, angina pectoris...
-Hops
A Hop-pillow is sometimes used for sleeplessness. To prepare it, fill a small pillow-case with hops, which have been sprinkled with alcohol to bring out the active principle. Tincture of Hops, dose a...
-Hot Water
Hot water, as a means of conveying heat to the interior of the body, is a stimulant to the stomach, to the great nerve centres back of the stomach, and to the general blood-circulation. Hence the effi...
-Huxham's Tincture Of Peruvian Bark
A good tonic in feeble conditions of the body, as in slow convalescence from an illness, running down with work in summer time, etc. Dose, a teaspoonful, three times a day, in water ; best, a short ti...
-Hydrochlorate Of Cocaine
A preparation of the active principle of the leaves of the South American erythroxylon coca. It has been found, when applied (a few drops of a four per cent, solution in water) to the eyeball, throat,...
-Hyoscyamus
From the leaves of this plant (henbane) are made a solid extract, a fluid extract, and a tincture. Hyoscyamus is an anodyne; a good deal like opium in its effects on the system, but weaker ; and, ins...
-Hypophosphites
Compounds containing phosphorus, in a peculiar state of combination with other medical substances. Much used as an effective tonic, in low 510 states of the system, is the preparation called Fellows' ...
-Ingluvin
An extractive obtained from the gizzard of the common fowl, and, like pepsin, used as a tonic to the digestive organs. Some physicans report it to be very-effectual in relieving vomiting; especially t...
-Inhalation
This is breathing in vapor of some kind; which is considerably em-ployed in the treatment of diseases, especially of the throat and lungs ; as well as (by the use of ether, chloroform, and nitrous oxi...
-Injections
Injections {enema, enematd). - These are used for various purposes. Most commonly, into the bowels, to empty the lower bowel, when this is considered more prompt and convenient than medicine by the mo...
-Iodine
Lugol's iodine solution, the tincture of iodine, and iodide of potassium, all have medical uses; but not, as a rule, in 512 domestic practice. We may except, perhaps, the outward application of tinctu...
-Iodoform
A powerful drug, kept in the apothecary shops in the form of a powder. Sometimes prescribed as an internal medicine in scrofula, ulcer of the stomach, etc., in one-grain doses ; but it is much more of...
-Ipecacuanha
This is an active but mild emetic in large dose. In smaller quantities, it is an excellent loosener of cough (expectorant), and also a promoter of perspiration (diaphoretic ). It is one of the best of...
-Iron
There is iron in the blood of every man, woman, and child. Whether we ever have too much of it is not certain ; but, without doubt, many thin, pale, and weak people have too little of it. The conditio...
-Jalap
This is a very active purgative ; too much so for common use, but sometimes valuable in particular cases. In dropsy it is occasionally prescribed, along with cream of tartar, or with squills. I rememb...
-Juniper
The berries of the juniper tree or shrub ; used in medicine is as a diuretic in dropsy. A tea may be made by pouring a pint of boiling water upon half an ounce of bruised juniper berries, stirring and...
-Lactucarium
An extract from the common garden lettuce (lactuca). It is mildly narcotic and anodyne; promoting sleep like opium, but with much less power. The syrup of lactucarrium (named Auber-gier's syrup), is t...
-Lady Webster's Pills
The important thing in these is aloes. They are purgative, and, like other aloetic preparations, have some effect in promoting a tendency of blood towards the pelvic region of the body. They have much...
-Laudanum
Tincture of opium. One of the strongest of the opiate medicines. It is therefore a powerful anodyne and hypnotic {sleep-producer). Dose, for a grown person, from fifteen to thirty drops. 'In diarrhoe...
-Lavender
Aromatic flowers, well known for their pleasing perfume. The only preparation used as a medicine is the compound spirit of lavender. It is an agreeable warming, gently stimulating article; good in col...
-Lime-Water
Simply a solution of lime in water. Anybody can make it, by putting pure, clean, unslaked lime in pure water. Take a large bottle, and press into it enough lime to fill about one-fourth of its depth. ...
-Lobelia
The leaves and tops of this plant are employed best in the form of tincture. It is a powerful sedative medicine; capable, like tobacco, in large doses, of producing fatal prostration. Its most importa...
-Logwood
The reddish heartwood of a Central American tree. It was once more used than now, as a mild astringent for diarrhaea. A tea may be made of it by boiling an ounce of it, with a drachm of cinnamon, in a...
-Magnesia
A valuable home medicine, as an antacid laxative. It is particularly good when there is constipation, with sick stomach and headache. Even at the beginning of diarrhaea and cholera morbus, it is many ...
-Malt Extract
Especially in Germany, large use is made of preparations under this name. As sold in this country, some of them are too sweet to agree with the stomach. The best is Johann Hoff's Malz-Extract; made ...
-Manna
A sweet substance obtained from the trunk of the flowerish ash tree, in the countries bordering on the Mediterranean. Its only important use is to open the bowels of children and delicate people, incl...
-Mineral Waters
These may be classified simply as: 1. Alkaline. 2. Saline. 3. Sulphurous. 4. Chalybeate, containing Iron. 5. Purgative. 6. Limestone or Calcareous. 7. Thermal, i. e., Warm or Hot Springs. While some s...
-Morphia
It is not necessary to have morphia in the family medicine chest; laudanum and paregoric will do for opiates under almost all circumstances. ...
-Musk
A very strongly odorous substance, secreted by the musk-deer of the Himalaya Mountain region, in Asia. It is antispasmodic, that is, composing to disturbed nerves. Prescribed sometimes for whooping-co...
-Mustard-Plaster
One of the most frequently useful of all domestic remedies. When anybody is suffering pain, or, indeed, illness of any kind, if you do not know what to do, put on a mustard-plaster, near the seat of t...
-Myrrh
A gum-resin long known for its aromatic properties. Internally given, it is stimulant and tonic, and is an ingredient in some preparations intended to act upon the bowels or to restore suspended menst...
-Nitre
A name for saltpetre; called by chemists nitrate of potassium. It is a cooling, sedative salt, when taken internally. In ten-grain doses it is a useful medicine in acute bronchial inflammation (bronch...
-Nux Vomica
A poisonous seed or nut whose active principle is the alkaloid strychnia. It is best used in extract or tincture. Both are bitter tonics, with a powerful action on the nervous system, especially the s...
-Olive Oil
Probably the gentlest of all laxatives ; in teaspoonful to tablespoonful doses. For a delicate infant, needing to have the bowels acted upon, a teaspoonful is very good. The imitation of true olive oi...
-Opium
If all the medicines in the world were to be destroyed, except three, and we could choose the three, they should be quinine, opium and iron. The first cures the greatest number of cases of illness; th...
-Pepper
Of the two kinds used with food, red pepper (capsicum) is the more stimulating. It is sometimes given by physicians as a stimulant, in five-grain pills. A much more common use for it is to excite the ...
-Peppermint
Essence of peppermint is a pleasant, warm aromatic ; given as good for colic and sick stomach. Dose, ten drops for a grown person ; for an infant, from two drops down to half a drop (that is, add one ...
-Pepsin
Hard to get pure. Given for weak digestion. Dose, 5 grains. ...
-Permanganate Of Potassium
This salt, which gives a beautiful red color to water, has a remarkable action on all organic (animal or vegetable) matter. It is one of the best disinfectants. Five grains of it in a pint of water ...
-Phosphorus
Too dangerous for use as a domestic medicine, this is sometimes given by physicians as a powerful nerve-stimulant. Dose, one-thirtieth of a grain. Phosphates are safe compounds, often used. Parrish's ...
-Pink-Root
This American plant (Spi-gelia Marylandica) is a very good medicine for worms {vermifuge). It may be made into a a tea thus: Put together half an ounce of broken and bruised pink-root; senna leaves an...
-Potassa (Potash)
Solution of potassa is sometimes given as a medicine by physicians. Caustic potassa (vegetable caustic) is the solid stick, which, with care, may be used to destroy warts. More often, bicarbonate of p...
-Poultices
These are used to warm and soften the skin, when applied to inflamed parts of the surface of the body; particularly when a gathering (suppuration, abscess) is expected. Also, they often do good in cas...
-Pumpkin Seeds
These have a deserved reputation, as capable of driving a tapeworm out of the bowels. For such use, an ounce (about two tablespoonfuls) of the fresh seeds should, after removal of their outer skin, be...
-Quassia
A bitter wood which is a good, simple stomachic tonic, suitable for dyspepsia. It is best taken in the form of a tea. Half an ounce of it may be boiled for an hour or two in a pint of water. Dose, hal...
-Quinine
What is commonly so called and used in medicine is the sulphate of quinia. The alkaloid quinia is the most valuable of several obtained from Peruvian bark; that is, the bark of different species of ci...
-Rhatany
This is the root of krameria, a South American shrub. It is astringent; its tincture is the best preparation. Dose, a teaspoonful, in water. Used especially for diarrhoea. ...
-Rhubarb
The root of an Asiatic and European plant, is a gentle purgative, with also some tonic property, which makes it especially adapted to dyspeptic persons, and others disposed to constipation. Dose, for ...
-Santonin
One of the most effectual vermifuges; that is, medicines which either kill or drive out worms. It must be used with care, as excessive doses are violent in their action ; we may say poisonous. For lum...
-Sassafras Pith
A very soft material, Which gives a soothing (demulcent) property to water in which it is placed. It is often used in this way for inflammation of the eyes. ...
-Seidlitz Powders
Made by mixing bicarbonate of sodium, and tartrate of potassium and sodium (rochelle salt), in powder together, for one paper. For another paper, tartaric acid is put up, in proportionate quantity. Wh...
-Senna
The leaves of an Eastern plant; an active purgative, with a disposition to give some griping pain in its operation. This may be prevented by adding fennel seed {an aromatic) or oil of fennel to it whe...
-Soap
Castile soap is the kind preferred when nicety is particularly desired. This is used by some people to clean their teeth. It is an ingredient, also, in some purgative pills, and is commonly employed f...
-Soap Liniment
Camphorated tincture of soap. An excellent bathing material, so-called ; that is, for rubbing a part, to warm and stimulate the movement of blood at and near the surface. It is good for sore-throat, s...
-Soda
Bicarbonate of sodium is the chemical name of the article which is used in baking and washing, as well as in medicine. It is an excellent and not disagreeable antacid, relieving sourness of stomach, a...
-Spice-Plasters
When a child's stomach is sick, or it is obstinately colicky, one of the most helpful things is a spice-plaster. Take of ginger, cinnamon, and cloves, all powdered, each one or two teaspoonfuls; of wh...
-Squills
The bulb of an onion-like plant, of which the syrup is most used. It is an excellent cough-medicine (expectorant) : rather less loosening than ipecac, and therefore suited to a later stage in a bronch...
-Staphysagria
Stavesacre. A drug used in powder as an effective parasiticide; especially to destroy the eggs or nits of lice. Sulphide of Calcium, in quarter-grain doses or less, has the confidence of many physi...
-Sulphur
This is a mild and good laxative; particularly suitable for piles, and for those persons who are often troubled with colic. Dose, a teaspoonful; in molasses or milk. In recent cases of skin-disease, i...
-Tar
An old-time remedy for chronic bronchial trouble; especially likely to do good by inhalation. A tin cup containing tar may be kept over a slow flame, in the room with the invalid, so as to give off ta...
-Taraxacum
Everybody knows the dandelion plant. Taraxacum dens leonis is its botanical name. The leaves are liked by some people as a kind of greens for the table. The root has long been known, when chewed or ...
-Tarrant's Powders
A moderately active and not unpleasant cooling purgative. Dose, from a teaspoonful to a tablespoonful, according to the amount of effect desired. ...
-Tartar Emetic
A very harsh drug in its effects upon the human body, unless it be given in very small doses. Other emetics are always to be preferred when vomiting is to be produced. Its greatest value is in small d...
-Valerian
The root of an herb native to the Old World, of which the tincture and fluid extract are most used. It is a mild nervous stimulant and antispasmodic (composing agent). In hysterical cases, and in some...
-Vichy Water
An alkaline (antacid) mineral water of France, more agreeable because of its containing some free carbonic acid gas. It is recommended for dyspepsia with sour stomach; for gravel, and for gout; especi...
-Warner's Cordial
Tincture of Rhubarb and Senna this is, by composition. It is a warming, stimulating laxative to the bowels; good in gouty cases, and many others. Dose, one or two teaspoonfuls, in water. Watermelon-S...
-Wild Cherry Bark
One of our native American medicines, of real value. Like the fruit and leaves of the wild cherry tree, and like peach leaves and fruit-stones, this bark contains principles which, when water is added...
-Wistar's Lozenges
These are made of liquorice, gum-arabic, sugar, oil of anise, and a little opium. They are very quieting to a cough, but, as opium tends to check expectoration, they are not suitable for the early, ti...
-Doses Of Principal Medicines
Acetate of Ammonium Solution..... 1 Tablespoonful. Aromatic Spirit of Ammonia...... 10 to 30 Drops. Assafoetida, in Pill........... 3 to 5 Grains. Assafaetida, Milk.......... . Teaspoonful to Table...
-Largest Safe Doses of Poisonous Drugs
Every person should know the largest doses, which is safe to take, of active medicines. The following table shows the largest doses admissible, in grammes, and also the equivalent in grains for solids...
-For the Medicine Chest
The following household remedies are suggested for the family medicine chest : Castor-Oil, Essence of Ginger, Spiced Syrup of Rhubarb, Simple Syrup of Rhubarb, Camphor-water, Lime-water, Cinnamon-wat...
-Nursing And Care Of The Sick
In many kinds of illness, especially continued fevers, and other attacks attended by great debility, good nursing is well known to be as important as good doctoring. A careful physician will direct no...
-Qualities of a Good Nurse
What are the qualities that make a good nurse ? They are kindness, good common sense, carefulness, quietness, neatness, han-diness, cheerfulness. Kind a nurse must be, or mere professional skill and ...
-The Sick-Room
When it is possible to choose, the patient's room should be on the sunny side of the house, and on the second floor. It should be one of the largest in the house. If a room is necessarily small, more ...
-Warmth
A sick-room should, generally, be kept at a temperature betwen 68 and 700 Fahr. In a few exceptional cases, physicians may wish to have a room much warmer, at particular times. When fuel is scarc...
-Light
While the sunny side of the house is the best, and sunlight should be admitted (with few exceptions only) every day into the room, the sick person's eyes should not be exposed to a direct glare. The b...
-Air
In the sick-room the things to be done are, to have the air changed constantly, and at the same time to prevent direct draughts upon the patient's bed. If there are several windows, all but the one ne...
-The Sick-Bed
Select a wide and rather low bedstead, for ease in getting in and out; a wire bed-bottom ; next best to it, one on good springs, with a thick but soft mattress. No curtains should be placed around the...
-Sick-Garments
These should be as simple as possible. One sufficiently warm and long night-shirt or night-gown will, as a rule, be enough; the less worn, the easier it ,will be to make changes. If the limbs incline ...
-Washing and Bathing
Every morning, at least, a sick person's face should be freshened up by washing, in whatever manner his strength best allows. One really ill must have it done by another person. A soft wash rag may...
-Food For The Sick
Appetite almost disappears in severe illness, especially when there is fever; and the capacity to digest food is then nearly lost. It is best not to give large quantities, but keep up the nourishment ...
-Recipes For The Sick
Beef-Tea Chop a pound of good lean round of beaf into very small pieces. Pour over it a pint, or less (never more) of cold water. Cover it, and let it stand for two hours near the fire, or on a part ...
-Recipes For The Sick. Part 2
Raw-Beef Scrapings Take a piece of good tender beef, and, with a rather dull knife, scrape off all of it that will come, leaving the tough, gristly portions behind. The pasty meat thus obtained may b...
-Recipes For The Sick. Part 3
Vegetable Soup This may be made, of course, in many different ways. The following is about the simplest; put two potatoes, a handful of peas, one ripe tomato, and a piece of bread, into a quart of wa...
-Recipes For The Sick. Part 4
Imitation Of Mother's Milk Ob-tain from a druggist packages of pure milk-sugar containing, each, seventeen and three-quarter drachms. Dissolve one package in a pint of hot water. Mix together two tab...
-Giving Medicines
No one who cannot read should pour out a dose of medicine. Bottles containing poisonous drugs should be labeled poison, and such should, when practicable, be kept apart by themselves ; and should, esp...
-Accidents And Injuries
In all cases of accidents coolness and presence of mind are of the utmost consequence. Danger is increased by alarm and confusion. One who has his senses about him may, by simple and prompt action, in...
-Burns And Scalds
Burns are caused by dry heat, or by something else than water; scalds by boiling water, steam, or other hot fluids. The danger to life of either is in proportion to their extent of surface, and their ...
-Applications For Burns
For the burn or scald itself, there is no better application than lime water and oil (flaxseed, olive, or lard oil) mixed together in equal parts. Lint, if it can be had, if not, muslin or linen rags,...
-Choking. Strangling
These are not the same in causation ; but the danger is in both the same - stoppage of breathing by an obstruction in the windpipe. In choking, properly so called, the obstacle is within the throat; i...
-Drowning
One whole minute under water will, except with a few practised divers, end life in a human being. Still, by active means, those longer immersed, as much as five minutes, have been restored. It is alwa...
-Foreign Bodies in Ear
So disagreeable is the odor of the natural ear-wax, and so sticky is it to insect's feet and the bodies of grubs or worms, that they very seldom find their way into any one's ear; even when sleeping o...
-Foreign Bodies in Eye
Small particles, of sand, dust, cinders, from a locomotive, etc., often get under the upper or lower eyelid ; most frequently the latter. If the particle be very small, closing the eyes and blowing th...
-Fainting
One who faints, falls, unless held up, as when standing or sitting up in a crowded place. But not every fall is fainting. It may be an epileptic fit; but then the patient is convulsed; that is, his li...
-Fractures - Broken Bones
Most fre-quently broken is the radius; the thumb-side bone of the forearm, which is most closely connected with the hand. We may break it by falling on the hand with force. In the same way also the ul...
-Sprained Joints
Any of the joints maybe wrenched or sprained, without actual displacement. This happens often with the ankle, knee, wrist, elbow, fingers, etc. The ligaments are then stretched, and some of their fibr...
-Splinter Under Nail
To get out a splinter which is beneath the nail, pare the nail carefully, over the splinter, making a narrow groove, until its upper end is exposed. Then, with a pair of small nippers or tweezers, or ...
-Needle Penetration
A needle gives almost no pain in entering the flesh anywhere ; and it may slip about and be pushed by the muscles in various directions, so as to come near of through the surface far from where it ent...
-Foreign Bodies in Nose
Children now and then push peas, small marbles, etc., into their own or one another's noses. If the intruding thing be not very large, blowing the nose very hard, while the other nostril is closed by ...
-Wounds
These may be either Bruised, Crushed, Cut, Lacerated (torn), Penetrating, or Poisoned wounds. Bruises are familiar to everybody. If the blow or fall has been of such moderate violence as to injure on...
-Aconite Poisoning
All parts of this plant (Monkshood, Aconitum napellus) are poisonous-The only form in which any one is likely to take it injuriously is that of the Tincture of aconite root, in overdose (the proper do...
-Ammonia Poisoning
This is the volatile alkali. It has the same chemical relations as the fixed alkalies, potassa, soda, and lithia; but flies off into the air when exposed, requiring, unless dissolved, extreme cold or ...
-Arsenic Poisoning
Both by accident and through suicidal or murderous intent, this is one of the most frequently fatal poisons. Symptoms of arsenical poisoning are complex. It is an irritant-neurotic in its action. Abou...
-Carbolic Acid Poisoning
This is also called phenol. It is to coal-oil (petroleum) what creosote is to tar from wood. Symptoms of poisoning by either carbolic acid, kerosene, or crude petroleum, are those of an irritant narco...
-Chloral Poisoning
Hydrate of chloral is the right name of this medicine, which is much used, especially to promote sleep. It is very uncertain in its action upon different people. While some are but little affected by ...
-Chloroform Poisoning
This liquid is much used in Europe, but less than ether in this country, as an anaesthetic, by being breathed to annul the pain of surgical operations. It is more dangerous, by far, than ether or nitr...
-Copper Poisoning
While this metal, when pure, is not itself poisonous, its compounds are; and they are produced by the action on copper of the fluids of the stomach, or by acids and other materials used in cooking, pi...
-Corrosive Sublimate Poisoning
This, the chloride of mercury, is a deadly poison; three or four grains of it may kill a man. Symptoms of its action are, in a marked degree, those of the irritant poisons; a metallic taste, burning i...
-Fungi Poisoning
Mushrooms and Truffles belong to this group of plants ; both being largely eaten, and agreeing with most persons. Botanists inform us that there are many species of innocent and nourishing fungi; but ...
-Lead Poisoning
While metallic lead is not poisonous, many of its compounds are so. The one most nearly inert is the sulphate of lead. Hence sulphuric acid, and its salts, as sulphate of magnesium, are antidotes for ...
-Opium Poisoning
Symptoms of any kind of opiate poisoning are: in not very excessive dose, at first a short period of excitement; in overwhelming dose, this is absent and the deep stupor comes almost at once ; with cl...
-Phosphorus Poisoning
This substance, a small portion of which is always naturally present in our brains and in our bones, is, when in the separate state, almost destructive poison. It acts rapidly ; when, for example, end...
-Infancy and Childhood
Nourishment Every mother should, if she can, nourish her own child, from her own breast. This is nature's law, as well as the law of love. Some mothers, unfortunately, cannot furnish nourishment for...
-Milk
Cow's milk is almost the only kind used in this country for infants ; here and there, goat's milk may be had. Cow's milk is stronger in solid contents than woman's milk, but the latter is sweeter. C...
-Clothing for Infants
Let the clothing of infants, from birth, be warm enough and loose enough for comfort. No tight bands should ever be put on 554 them. Some parents, in over-anxiety about cold, put on three times as muc...
-Bathing Infants
Bathing A new-born child should be bathed only in warm water, in a warm room. From 950 to 900 should be the temperature of its bath ; the thermometer had better be used, as the touch is. so uncertain...
-Sleep for Children
For the first month or two, an infant naturally sleeps more than half its time. All through the first year, many babies Sleep from twelve to sixteen hours in the twenty-four. It is a grand thing for a...
-Teething
Mothers and nurses ought to know what to look for in their babies' mouths, as the months follow each other in their first two years. Only twenty teeth, be it remembered, come in the first set, or, mi...
-Why Babies Cry
A word here about babies' crying. A healthy child, not teething, if well taken care of, will very seldom cry. If it becomes very hungry, and is not nourished, or is cold, or too warm, or is left with ...
-What Teething Is
Teething is not a disease, a morbid process, at all. But it is an important change, which for the time renders the child more than before or after liable to disorders, under any disturbing causes ; an...
-Summer Dangers
In our American cities, hot weather kills more young children than any other cause. Look at the weekly record of deaths in New York or Philadelphia, and you will find that every degree of noon tempera...
-Rules for Management of Infants
Rule I Bathe the child once a day in tepid water. If it is feeble, sponge it all over once a day with tepid water, or with tepid water and vinegar. The health of a child depends much upon its cleanli...
-Rules for Diet of Infants
Rule 6 Breast-milk is the only proper food for infants. If the supply is ample, and the child thrives on it, no other kind of food should be given while the hot weather lasts. If the mother has not e...
-Weaning the Infant
Rule 10 The nursing-bottle must be kept perfectly clean; otherwise the milk will turn sour, and the child will be made ill. After each meal it should be emptied, rinsed out, taken apart, and the tube...
-The Laws Of Hygiene
How to Keep Well. In the pages over which we have passed, our effort has been, as the reader will perceive, to describe the various ailments with which man is afflicted and the accidents or injuries ...
-Impure Air
The air which we breathe is rarely quite pure, and is often very impure. This is especially the case in city life and within our houses. Pure air is only to be found in the open country, the mountains...
-Diseases Due to Impure Air
Respiration The effect upon most people of breathing over-respired air is to cause heaviness, sleepiness, headache, giddiness, fainting, and sometimes vomiting. When the air is still more impure deat...
-Diseases Due to Impure Water
Water is another fertile source of disease, many organic and inorganic impurities making their way into it. It is to the 562 former that its unhealthfulness is generally due. Nearly all water from the...
-Purification of Water
Fortunately, it is comparatively easy to destroy the injurious organic impurities of water and render it wholesome for drinking purposes. This, it is true, demands a degree of care and precaution whic...
-Diseases Due to Food
Food may in various ways give rise to disease. Over-eating is one source of injury to the system. Part of the food is not absorbed, and may become putrid in the intestines, causing dyspepsia, constipa...
-Diseases Due to Food. Continued
Food Diseased In Itself Diseased animals not unfrequently communicate their diseases to man. Thus so called measly cattle and pigs contain in the flesh or muscles innumerable small bladders, which ...
-Infectious Diseases
Diseases which may be communicated from one person to another, or from an animal to a man, are known as infectious diseases. Some of these, such as itch, lice, ringworm, hydrophobia, and a few others,...
-Infectious Diseases. Continued
Why Children Should Not Be Purposely Exposed To Infectious Fevers It is the custom with some ignorant mothers to pur-566 posely expose their children to mild cases of fever, especially measles, chick...
-Contagious Diseases
The following points will help to determine the nature of a suspicious illness: Disease Rash or Eruption Appearance Duration in Days Remarks Chicken-pox....... Small rose pim...
-How to Avoid Disease
There are various ways in which disease may be avoided. One is not to expose* ourselves to contagion or injurious influences. We need to be careful of the food we eat, the water we drink, even the air...
-Muscular Exercise
Exercise of all parts of the body is an absolute necessity for the maintenance of perfect health. If a steam-engine is allowed to stand idle it will soon rust and get out of order. Similarly, if the b...
-Modes of Exercise
Walking is excellent ; unsurpassed in benefit to the system if one can afford time to get enough of it; a pleasant country, moderate weather, and good company being almost essential to its advantages....
-Clothing
Clothing, to promote health, should be : sufficient for comfortable warmth ; not excessive in quantity or pressure; properly distributed over the body ; suited to permit transpiration and moisture; ch...
-How to Live Long
As a brief summary statement of the most essential conditions of health and longevity, we may conclude our study of Hygiene with the following precepts : i. Never breathe three breaths of foul air whe...
-Value Of Vegetable And Animal Food
No subject is of more vital importance to the care of health than that of food. Hence a knowledge of the value of various food products is indispensable to housekeepers and to those who value their ow...
-Bread
Time out of mind the staff of life, was made of brayed grain by our ancient forefathers before they left Western Asia. Bread contains nitrogenous and non-nitrogenous food principles ; gluten and sta...
-Vegetables
Peas and Beans are highly nitrogenous, besides containing a great deal of starch. But that their share of salts, especially phosphates, is less, and that they are more uncertain of digestion, they wou...
-Fruits
As a rule, fresh fruits are wholesome. They promote the natural action of the bowels, and are refreshing and antiscorbutic. When the bowels are disordered, as in diarrhoea or dysentery (except when th...
-Eggs
There is excellent nourishment, mostly albuminoid, but with a small amount of fat (in the yolk) in eggs. There is, of course, no truth in the popular saying, that an egg is as good as a pound of meat...
-Meats
All parts of the Animal Kingdom furnish food for men in some quarters of the earth. Vertebrates are represented abundantly; in mammals (as the ox and sheep), birds, reptiles, {e.g. the terrapin), and ...
-Time Table for the Housekeeper
Mode of Preparation Time ok Cooking TlMk OF Digestion Apples, sour, hard..................................... Raw H. M. H. M. 2 50 Apples, sweet and mellow............
-Images
CANTHARIS VITTATA, CANTHARIS VESICATORIA. ...

The Home Cyclopedia Of Necessary Knowledge

Embracing Five Books In One Volume

Book I. The Home Cyclopedia Of General Information

Book II. The Home Cyclopedia Of Business

Book III. The Home Cyclopedia Of History

Book IV. The Home Cyclopedia Of Cooking And Housekeeping

Book V. The Home Cyclopedia Of Health And Medicine










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