books



previous page: The Boyhood of Great Men | by John G. Edgar
  
page up: History Books
  
next page: A Short History Of The English People | by John Richard Green

Modern England | by Justin McCarthy



In these two volumes my purpose is to give an account of the social and political development of England since the opening of the century. I do not attempt anything like a minute and detailed history of the events that followed each other during that time; and indeed my intention is rather to draw something like a picture than to give to my readers a chronicle and a record. I have endeavoured to describe each remarkable political and social development, and to group the statesmen and philanthropists of every order by whom each development was assisted in its progress.

TitleModern England
AuthorJustin McCarthy
PublisherG. P. Putnam's Sons
Year1898
Copyright1898, G. P. Putnam's Sons
AmazonModern England Before The Reform Bill

Modern England

Vol I: Before The Reform Bill

Vol II: From The Reform Bill To The Present Time

by Justin McCarthy, m.p.

Author Of "The History Of Our Own Times," Etc.

London

T. Fisher Unwin

Paternoster Square

New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons

MDCCCXCIX

Copyright by T. Fisher Uxwin, 1898 (For Great Britain).

Copyright by G. P. Putnam's Sons, 1898 (For the United States of America)

-Preface
In this volume and in the one to follow my purpose is to give an account of the social and political development of England since the opening of the century. I do not attempt anything like a minute an...
-I. Arms And The Man
In the Annual Register for the year 1800 we find on the opening page of its preface a remarkable prophecy. The Temple of Janus, says the preface, is shut; it is not unreasonable to hope that it wil...
-II. England's "Benevolent Despot"
Let us see what was the condition of England at the time when Napoleon's career was drawing to its close. So long as the great war was going on England kept a united front to the enemy. But of course ...
-II. England's "Benevolent Despot". Part 2
When the fall of Napoleon brought peace to Europe, that peace found England in a condition which might well have awakened despondency and almost despair in the minds of some of the best and wisest Eng...
-II. England's "Benevolent Despot". Part 3
William Wordsworth. (1770-1850). The very names of political parties have undergone a change since the days of Fox and Pitt. Fox was a Whig; Pitt in his least happy days was a Tory. The term Whig, ...
-II. England's "Benevolent Despot". Part 4
George III., it has been said, might have made, had he been more nobly endowed with intellect, a fair illustration of the ideal benevolent despot. He was not in any sense of the word a bad man; he ...
-III. In The Wake Of The Peace
It is necessary to go back for a little in order to take a glance at the condition in which Europe was left by the Treaty of Vienna. That Treaty was agreed upon by the representatives of the European ...
-III. In The Wake Of The Peace. Part 2
The Holy Alliance, as it was afterwards called - the Alliance started by the Emperor of Russia, and joined in by the Emperor of Austria and the King of Prussia - proclaimed its mission. The Holy Allia...
-III. In The Wake Of The Peace. Part 3
We shall show before long how it was reserved for the best days of Canning's foreign policy not merely to withdraw England from any confederacy with the Holy Alliance, but to checkmate altogether some...
-III. In The Wake Of The Peace. Part 4
The great reforms which England then needed were: the reform of the constitutional system, the reform of the criminal code, the abolition of abuses in the Court of Chancery, the reform of the financia...
-III. In The Wake Of The Peace. Part 5
So Lord Eldon went on opposing all reform, maintaining and championing every abuse in the electoral system and in the Court of Chancery, putting every obstacle he could in the path of any and every mo...
-IV. George IV
George III. died in 1820, and as a matter of course George IV. succeeded to the throne. The new King had ruled so long during the eclipse of his father that his formal elevation to the sovereign power...
-IV. George IV. Part 2
In the meantime the purely political troubles went on increasing : popular demonstrations were turned into riots; riots led to prosecutions and imprisonments. The King's counsellors still could sugges...
-IV. George IV. Part 3
The magistrates had sworn in a very large number of special constables, and had called out the services of a large body of Hussars, a troop of Horse Artillery with two cannons, a regiment of infantry,...
-IV. George IV. Part 4
The officers in command of the troops, and the troops themselves, were, of course, entirely innocent of any desire to massacre anybody. In almost every case in the modern history of England in which t...
-V. The Cato Street Conspiracy
One of the conspiracies of that season, when the air was alive with the rumours of conspiracy, was a genuine plot and a murderous plot, and therefore deserves an especial notice. This was the Cato Str...
-V. The Cato Street Conspiracy. Part 2
The whole scheme turned out a grotesque failure. One of the conspiring gang gave Lord Harrowby warning of what was in preparation. Lord Harrowby showed prudence and judgment; he did not seem to take a...
-V. The Cato Street Conspiracy. Part 3
On the 20th of April, Thistlewood and four of his accomplices were found guilty and condemned to death. Their trial had lasted three days, and the trial only made it more and more clear that the consp...
-V. The Cato Street Conspiracy. Part 4
One famous illustration of this condition of things became an effective argument in favour of reform at a day a little later, which we shall have to deal with more fully after a while, when a definite...
-VI. George Canning
Among the rising names of statesmen in the early part of the century the greatest name was undoubtedly that of George Canning. The men who have hitherto been mentioned in these pages were, for the mos...
-VI. George Canning. Part 2
In any case, he does not seem to have quite made up his mind in his early days as to the precise political opinions with which he was to identify his career. He supported Pitt, for example, in the gre...
-VI. George Canning. Part 3
Castlereagh, Lord Londonderry, would naturally have been the man chosen by England for such a purpose; but Londonderry was gone, and it was resolved to send no less a person than the Duke of Wellingto...
-VI. George Canning. Part 4
One passage of a famous speech delivered by Canning in Plymouth has already became classic in our language. It has been quoted again and again, but it will bear quotation once more, if only to show th...
-VI. George Canning. Part 5
A veteran member of the House of Lords, who was in Canning's time a Member of the House of Commons, had the good fortune to be present when Canning made his famous declaration. Many years ago he told ...
-VI. George Canning. Part 6
Many critics at the time and many readers of a later generation have sometimes found fault with Canning's speeches, on the ground that they were not inspired by any passionate enthusiasm for the cause...
-VI. George Canning. Part 7
It was not the purpose of Canning that things should come to such a pass as that. His sympathies went with the cause of Greek independence; but he dreaded the risk of a European war; and he could not ...
-VI. George Canning. Part 8
Canning's tenure of office was destined to be but short. Canning and Huskisson were both in very feeble health. Huskisson was ordered abroad by his medical attendant; Canning, also, was urged to go ab...
-VII. Religious Disabilities
Lord John Russell, on the 26th of February, 1828, may be said to have practically begun his great career as a Reform leader by bringing forward a motion in the House of Commons, on the subject of what...
-VII. Religious Disabilities. Part 2
One of the peers who bore an honoured name, Lord Holland, entered his protest on the books of the House against this so-called amendment. It should be explained that by ancient usage, a Member of the ...
-VII. Religious Disabilities. Part 3
Even in the House of Commons, which he entered after he had accomplished his greatest triumph, and where he found an audience for the most part bitterly hostile, O'Connell conquered that audience, and...
-VII. Religious Disabilities. Part 4
It would have been obvious, therefore, to a man of less foresight than Peel, that to give the Catholics in Ireland the full right of vote and representation would be to speak the doom of the Irish Chu...
-VII. Religious Disabilities. Part 5
In the meanwhile Peel was continually pressed by Lord Anglesey to come to some decision on the subject. There was a tremendous difficulty in front, and Anglesey saw but one way out of it. What he felt...
-VII. Religious Disabilities. Part 6
He took it for granted that he must, during his long career as a Tory statesman, have aroused a hostile feeling against him in the minds of the Irish Catholic leaders, and he firmly believed that a me...
-VII. Religious Disabilities. Part 7
On the day just before that which Peel had appointed for his statement in the House, he was summoned, with the Duke of Wellington and the Lord Chancellor, to attend the Sovereign. Then the King bluntl...
-VIII. Coming Reform Casts Its Shadow Before
The first impulse to the Reform cause in England was undoubtedly given by the great French Revolution. Another impulse in the same way was given during the closing years of George IV. by a much smalle...
-VIII. Coming Reform Casts Its Shadow Before. Part 2
John Constable, R.A. (I776-I837). The King still complacently hoped for the best, according to his interpretation of the word. There had been an expedition to Algiers in consequence of a quarrel be...
-VIII. Coming Reform Casts Its Shadow Before. Part 3
The English public, on the whole, even including the most advanced reformers, were well inclined to give the new king a fair chance. Some of the reformers, indeed, were comforted by the conviction tha...
-VIII. Coming Reform Casts Its Shadow Before. Part 4
But even then popular opinion was ready to believe in the possibility of any dark deed being sanctioned by the Duke of Cumberland. Even those who were not alarmists, and were not disposed to exaggerat...
-VIII. Coming Reform Casts Its Shadow Before. Part 5
The Duke advanced along the platform to meet Mr. Huskisson, who was approaching him, and held out his hand in cordial greeting. Before Huskisson had well time to take the proffered hand some alarm was...
-IX. The Great Reform Bill
A New Parliament met on October 26, 1830. The opening debate was as usual on the Address in reply to the Speech from the Throne, and it proved to be a debate of the greatest importance. The Governmen...
-IX. The Great Reform Bill. Part 2
The main interest as to the members of the new administration attached to Henry Brougham and to Lord John Russell, the Earl Russell of a later day. Brougham was to be Lord Chancellor, and the news of ...
-IX. The Great Reform Bill. Part 3
But Russell's speeches never failed to be interesting in themselves; and they had the not common advantage of being as good to read as they were good to hear. The new Ministry has to be remembered for...
-IX. The Great Reform Bill. Part 4
A stranger who was told that this country is unparalleled in wealth and industry, and more civilised and more enlightened than any country was before it, that it is a country that prides itself on it...
-IX. The Great Reform Bill. Part 5
Twenty other towns of smaller size were to be represented each by one member. The metropolis itself was to have eight new members, two members each being given to the Tower Hamlets, Holborn, Finsbury,...
-IX. The Great Reform Bill. Part 6
This was, perhaps, the extreme high-water mark of the most antique Toryism. Sir Robert Inglis naturally defended the system of small boroughs - the rotten boroughs as they came to be called - which we...
-IX. The Great Reform Bill. Part 7
During the course of the debate, a very remarkable speech was made by the Irish leader, Daniel O'Connell. O'Connell seems to have seen farther and more distinctly into the future than any other of the...
-IX. The Great Reform Bill. Part 8
On the 21 st of March, 1831, Lord John Russell moved the second reading of the English Reform Bill. The second reading was strongly resisted, and the Tory speakers who had argued against the first rea...
-X. The Reform Bill Again
On the 24th of June Lord John Russell introduced a second Reform Bill which might be called just the same in principle and substance as that which he had brought in on the former occasion. The second ...
-X. The Reform Bill Again. Part 2
In the meantime, the reformers of the country were not idle. Meetings were held in London, and in most of the towns, calling on the Government to take heart of grace, and not to give in to the Tories ...
-X. The Reform Bill Again. Part 3
The news of the adverse division in the House of Lords created a passionate sensation all over the country. Great meetings were held in every city and town; in many places the shops were closed and mo...
-X. The Reform Bill Again. Part 4
Parliament was called together again, on December 6, 1831. The King opened the session in person, and announced in his Royal Speech that Bills would be introduced for the Reform of the House of Common...
-X. The Reform Bill Again. Part 5
The Bill came on for second reading in the House of Lords on 9th of April, and the Duke of Wellington spoke out as strongly against the measure as he had spoken against the First Reform Bill brought i...
-X. The Reform Bill Again. Part 6
He had no taste for the stirring up of a popular revolution; and amongst those to whom he looked for advice he found no trustworthy person who could counsel him to any such purpose. Wellington, Lyndhu...
-X. The Reform Bill Again. Part 7
The name of Lord John Russell reminds us that in one of the closing debates on the Reform Bill in the House of Commons, Russell made use of a particular phrase which was afterwards brought up against ...
-XI. Slavery - Black And White
The first great work done by the Reformed Parliament was the total abolition of Slavery in the West Indian and other colonies of England. The new Parliament, indeed, showed itself very eager for the w...
-XI. Slavery - Black And White. Part 2
Then again a very taking argument was found by those who insisted that the workers on the West Indian plantations were for the most part better fed and cared for than the white slaves who drudged in a...
-XI. Slavery - Black And White. Part 3
William Wilberforce, M.P. (1759-1833). A great meeting was held in London to agitate for the complete abolition of Slavery throughout all the British Colonies. Brougham brought on the whole questio...
-XI. Slavery - Black And White. Part 4
Mr. Buxton proposed one or two amendments to the third resolution, but was prevailed upon, by the advice of some of his friends, to allow the resolution to pass so far as he was concerned, and without...
-XI. Slavery - Black And White. Part 5
Some of us had the honour of his personal acquaintance, and all who knew him admired his thorough probity, his perseverance, and his practical philanthropy. He was not by any means intellectually a gr...
-XI. Slavery - Black And White. Part 6
Different kinds of productiveness required different hours and conditions of production. In some trades business came with an almost overwhelming rush at one period of the year, and was slack and shor...
-XI. Slavery - Black And White. Part 7
For years and years we, in these countries, have grown out of that condition of mental devolopment which can be satisfied with the dogma that freedom of contract and the laws of political economy may...
-XI. Slavery - Black And White. Part 8
It often happened that when the boy was sent up the chimney was still hot from the recent use of the fire; and the poor little creature got severely burnt. It was proved beyond question or doubt that ...
-XI. Slavery - Black And White. Part 9
Another of the reforms, which like those we have already been describing, came in the wake of the great Reform Bill itself, was the abolition of the law of impressment for the navy. How long that law ...
-XI. Slavery - Black And White. Part 10
Take, they said, the great Atlantic lines of steamers, the great Pacific lines of steamers, the merchant steamers sailing every day from the port of London, from Liverpool, from Newcastle, from Glasgo...
-I. The Convict Ship
Something that might almost be called a rush of reform had come on many departments of our legislation and our social system. The rigour of capital punishment was reduced by several successive Acts of...
-I. The Convict Ship. Part 2
A cargo of wretches was sent out to New South Wales, and out of these several, after landing there, committed fresh crimes, and were therefore deported to Norfolk Island. It is not left altogether to ...
-I. The Convict Ship. Part 3
In the town of Sydney there were three distinct orders of population, brought together in a closeness of propinquity such as no European city could show. There were the respectable settlers, the owner...
-I. The Convict Ship. Part 4
The convict obtained his ticket-of-leave, got som decent employment, committed a new crime, was tried and sent to prison again, and after the usual period of probation came out again a free man, and s...
-I. The Convict Ship. Part 5
The manner of treating political prisoners has lately, once again, been the subject of much public discussion in England; and the question has yet to be settled whether it is either wise or just to su...
-II. Tithes And State Church In Ireland
The conditions of Ireland soon began to be a fresh source of disappointment to all the easy-minded persons who are fond of the belief that when a Government has taken one step on the path of reform it...
-II. Tithes And State Church In Ireland. Part 2
The words of the Archbishop contained for the most part nothing but sound sense and truth. Resistance to the payment of tithes in Ireland had, indeed, become so thoroughly and actively organised that ...
-II. Tithes And State Church In Ireland. Part 3
In the meantime special attention should be directed to a momentous passage in a speech delivered by Lord Ebrington in the House of Commons. Lord Ebrington had himself been a member of the committee a...
-II. Tithes And State Church In Ireland. Part 4
Perhaps with this touching scene we may begin to take our leave of William IV. This is not an abstract and brief chronicle of the rise and fall of Ministries or a minute account of the stages through ...
-II. Tithes And State Church In Ireland. Part 5
It would be unjust and even cruel to deny that the King was a religious man according to his lights, but his lights were many times sadly blurred by surrounding conditions. He was essentially a weak m...
-III. Queen Victoria
William IV. had only breathed his last word and given his last sigh when the messengers had started from Windsor to Kensington Palace to announce the event to his successor, and to summon a new Sovere...
-III. Queen Victoria. Part 2
When Queen Victoria came to the throne there were many men of the highest order of ability in both Houses of Parliament. Lord Brougham was, perhaps, the strongest man in the House of Lords, so far as ...
-III. Queen Victoria. Part 3
George Grote, the celebrated historian of Greece, was one of the Members for the City of London, and was one of the earliest and most thorough advocates of the ballot system in parliamentary election....
-III. Queen Victoria. Part 4
The social condition was very like that which prevailed in the Southern States of America after the emancipation of the negroes had been proclaimed, and when the great Civil War had come to an end. Th...
-III. Queen Victoria. Part 5
The Queen accepted every name which Peel proposed to her in the list of the new Ministry; but Peel suddenly came to observe the composition of the Royal household and the names of the ladies of the Be...
-III. Queen Victoria. Part 6
It was agreed upon that on a change of Ministry the Queen would listen to any representation from the new Prime Minister as to the composition of her Household, and would arrange for the retirement, o...
-IV. The Foundation Of The Canadian Dominion
In the first year of the young Queen's reign serious disturbances, which soon grew into actual rebellion, broke out in Canada. This colony had been the possession of the British Crown since the days o...
-IV. The Foundation Of The Canadian Dominion. Part 2
But it was impossible to conceal the fact that while as yet there was no actual rebellion in Upper Canada, there was discontent enough to make it rather unwise for the Home Government to push matters ...
-IV. The Foundation Of The Canadian Dominion. Part 3
In the meantime Lord Durham's enemies were raging at home. They fixed their eyes, and endeavoured to fix the eyes of others, on the mere fact that in his decrees intended for the immediate suppression...
-IV. The Foundation Of The Canadian Dominion. Part 4
The Dominion was to have a Federal Parliament with local, or what would be called in the American Republic, State Legislatures. The Federal or Central Parliament was to be made up of a Senate and a Ho...
-IV. The Foundation Of The Canadian Dominion. Part 5
During later years the question of federation for the Australian Colonies has become a subject of frequent and important public discussion. There are not three, but only two, courses open to these Col...
-IV. The Foundation Of The Canadian Dominion. Part 6
These Colonies, if represented in the House of Commons, must be represented on some principle of proportion - a proportion, let us say, according to population. But that, at a moment of crisis, might ...
-V. The Chartist Collapse
One of the most remarkable political developments in the earlier part of the Queen's reign took shape in the Chartist organisation. It had its birth in Birmingham, where but a very few weeks after the...
-V. The Chartist Collapse. Part 2
As we have already seen, some of the principal points of the Charter were predicted as an absolute necessity by O'Connell and others when the Reform Bill of 1831 came up for debate. Therefore the drea...
-V. The Chartist Collapse. Part 3
As the movement grew and grew, it divided itself again into the moral force and the physical force Chartists, as they were called at the time. The physical force Chartists openly proclaimed their utte...
-VI. Steam, Telegraph, And Postage
The earlier years of Queen Victoria's reign saw the introduction of a number of scientific and industrial improvements in the world's social condition such as the whole history of the old world had no...
-VI. Steam, Telegraph, And Postage. Part 2
On the 5th of July, 1839, the Chancellor of the Exchequer made his usual financial statement, and it proved to contain an announcement which marks a new era in our social history. The Finance Minister...
-VI. Steam, Telegraph, And Postage. Part 3
The revenues of the Post Office began to fall off steadily, while the country was everywhere increasing in population and in wealth. The abuse lasted, as all abuses do, until the man predestined to be...
-VI. Steam, Telegraph, And Postage. Part 4
In the House of Lords it was condemned by the Duke of Wellington in the strongest way as an imprudent and half-crazy proposal which could only end in heavy loss to the revenue, without doing any parti...
-VII. " The Stockdale Case "
The celebrated case of Stockdale against Hansard calls for a special notice. It became historical, and, indeed, it marked an epoch in the history of the House of Commons. No other such curious complic...
-VIII. The Opium Question
Before entering on the somewhat lengthy story of the Opium question, and the wars with China which came of it, it is pleasant to have to record one bright and happy event - the marriage of Queen Victo...
-VIII. The Opium Question. Part 2
The Chinese Government, indeed, were charged with having no higher purpose in view than to keep a monopoly of the well-paying traffic in their own hands, and to prevent the East India Company and othe...
-VIII. The Opium Question. Part 3
The Marquis Of Salisbury. 183O-. The war with China had to be put off for the time partly because of the outbreak of the great Indian Mutiny, and when we were ready to begin it again we had France ...
-IX. The Irish National Movement
The year 1843 became memorable because it saw the climax of the repeal agitation under Daniel O'Connell. O'Connell was really the man who had carried Catholic Emancipation, or, at least, had compelled...
-IX. The Irish National Movement. Continued
The appeal was held in September, 1844. At that time the House of Lords was the High Court of Appeal on all legal questions. Now it need hardly be said that the vast majority of the members of the Hou...
-X. Peel's Triumph And Fall
One of the most important measures of Peel's financial administration was the passing of the Bank Charter Act in 1844. The object of the Bank Charter Act was to separate the issue from the banking dep...
-X. Peel's Triumph And Fall. Part 2
The enterprise, therefore, failed, and there was nothing for it but to send for Peel again, and urge him to form the best administration he could, and carry on his work. Peel consented, and formed an ...
-X. Peel's Triumph And Fall. Part 3
Lord Aberdeen. 1784-1860. It may be, said Peel, that I shall leave a name sometimes remembered with expressions of goodwill in those places which are the abode of men whose lot it is to labour...
-XI. Crimea And Cawnpore
The Crimean War seemed at the time an event of gigantic magnitude, and even still it stands out like a great chapter in the history of modern Europe. It was, however, only an incident, and an incident...
-XI. Crimea And Cawnpore. Part 2
Since that time we have had the Eastern Question breaking out again and again, and the settlement has yet to be found. The alarm about Russia and the Black Sea and Constantinople and the Dardanelles h...
-XI. Crimea And Cawnpore. Part 3
At this time the native soldiers of the three presidencies, the three great divisions of the Indian Empire - Bengal, Bombay, and Madras - were nearly three hundred thousand in number, while the Europe...
-XII. The Waning Century
Once again the course of an English Administration was disturbed by events occurring in Paris. During the earlier part of January, 1858, no one could have had the slightest reason to imagine that anyt...
-XII. The Waning Century. Part 2
The closing days of 1859 were made memorable by the death of Lord Macaulay. We have already in this book borne tribute to the services which Macaulay had rendered to many a great political cause. But ...
-XII. The Waning Century. Part 3
The latest advice which the dying Prince gave on public affairs recommended calmness and friendly forbearance on the part of England in the dispute about the seizure of the Confederate envoys. A disti...
-XII. The Waning Century. Part 4
( From a photograph by Messrs. Russell & Son.) H. R. H. The Prince Of Wales. 1841. (From a photograph by Messrs. Russell & Son.) H. R. H. The Princess Of Wales. 1844. England lost one of her fam...
-XII. The Waning Century. Part 5
He had been an unsparing worker, and found a kind of pleasure in congenial work. He loved a country life and the pursuits of a country gentleman, and yet he doomed himself to the drudgery of office an...
-XIII. Lord Beaconsfield
A Career of brilliant struggle came at last to what must be described as its crowning success. In 1868 Mr. Disraeli became for the first time Prime Minister. Punch had a striking cartoon to illustrate...
-XIII. Lord Beaconsfield. Part 2
In other words, when an election had taken place and an election petition was presented claiming the seat on behalf of the defeated candidate, the custom was that the House of Commons should appoint a...
-XIII. Lord Beaconsfield. Part 3
Mr. Disraeli, with whose career we are at present especially concerned, came back to office in 1874. During his second Premiership his Government introduced one measure which was undoubtedly satisfact...
-XIV. Mr. Gladstone
Meanwhile a new breath of reform had begun to animate the country. It was quite understood that so long as Lord Palmerston lived there was no real chance for any reform movement. Lord Palmerston had m...
-XIV. Mr. Gladstone. Part 2
In the session of 1867 Disraeli brought in a Reform measure which was evidently and almost ostentatiously submitted to the House as a scheme open to alteration and improvement of any kind. Mr. Lowe ha...
-XIV. Mr. Gladstone. Part 3
(From a photograph by Messrs. Russell & Son.) Joseph Chamberlain 1836. During all this time Mr. Gladstone had borne many a noble part in other than domestic affairs. He had championed the cause of ...
-XIV. Mr. Gladstone. Part 4
Duke Of Argyll,. We have already spoken in these pages of Lord Derby as a man of cool, clear intellect, of statesmanlike understanding, not in the least likely to be led out of his straight course,...
-XIV. Mr. Gladstone. Part 5
The motto of Mr. Parnell and his followers seemed to be, If you will not spare time to discuss the claims and grievances of Ireland, you shall not be allowed to transact any other business whatever....
-XIV. Mr. Gladstone. Part 6
Gladstone on April 8, 1886, introduced a Bill to establish a system of Home Rule in Ireland. The principal object of the measure was to give to Ireland some such system of domestic self-government as ...
-XV. The Close Of Some Great Careers
For some time before and shortly after Mr. Gladstone's retirement, there had been a remarkable succession of deaths among remarkable men in England. In 1890 Cardinal Newman, one of the most celebrated...
-XV. The Close Of Some Great Careers. Continued
Thomas Henry Huxley. 1825-1895. On Mr. Gladstone's withdrawal from public life, Lord Rosebery became Prime Minister. There was nothing else for it; there was no other man whom the Liberal Party cou...
-XVI. Literature, Art, And Science
It would be impossible to conclude the story of England's Nineteenth Century without saying something about its literature, its art, and its science. It would be impossible also, in the space at our c...
-Books For Recreation And Study
Published By T. Fisher Unwin, II, Paternoster Buildings, London, E.C. . . . . T. Fisher Unwin, Publisher, Six-Shilling Novels In uniform green cloth, large crown 8vo., gilt tops, 6s, Effie Hetheri...
-Books For Recreation And Study. Part 2
The Cameo Series . * * * Demy 12mo., half-bound, paper boards, price 3s. 6d. Vols. 14-17, 3s. 6d. net.. Also, an Edition de Luxe, limited to 30 copies, printed on Japan paper. Prices on applicati...
-Books For Recreation And Study. Part 3
The Series has taken for its motto the Miltonic prayer: - 1. Sir Walter Ralegh. By Martin A. S. Hume, Author of The Courtships of Queen Elizabeth, etc. 2. Sir Th0a1as Maitland; the Mastery of t...
-Books For Recreation And Study. Part 4
The Herb Moon by John Oliver Hobbes Third Edition, Crown 8vo., cloth, 6s. The jaded reader who needs sauce for his literary appetite cannot do better than buy ' The Herb Moon.' - Literary World...
-Books For Recreation And Study. Part 5
Builders of Greater Britain. Edited by H. F. Wilson. A Set of 10 Volumes, each with Photogravure Frontispiece and Map, large crown 8vo, cloth, 5s. each. List of Volumes. 1. Sir Walter Ralegh; the ...









TOP
previous page: The Boyhood of Great Men | by John G. Edgar
  
page up: History Books
  
next page: A Short History Of The English People | by John Richard Green