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Haven's Complete Manual Of Practical Phonography



The only Treatise on the Art embracing the Secrets of the Profession, together with all New Discoveries of Value up to date of Publication. Presenting within its pages the Author's "300-Words-a-Minute Short-Hand Lessons," and his complete original Routine for qualifying Students for Office Short-Hand Positions within three months from date of first lesson, Court and Convention Reporting in six to nine months, making NO failures where directions are followed.

TitleHaven's Complete Manual Of Practical Phonography
AuthorCurtis Haven
PublisherCurtis Haven
Year1902
Copyright1893, Curtis Haven
Haven's Complete Manual Of Practical Phonography

Haven's Complete Manual Of Practical Phonography

Adapted to Self-Instruction and the Use of Schools and Colleges.

No Other Short-Hand Book Needed.

By Curtis Haven,

Expert Law And Convention Reporter, Journalist, Author, And Teacher Of Over Twenty Years' Experience.

Philadelphia, Pa.

Published By The Author.

1902.

To Her At Whose Knee My First Childish Attempts At Unraveling The Mysteries Of The Roman Alphabet Were Made; Who So Practically Directed My School-Boy Studies ; Who Assisted Me Over The Rough Places Of My Early Phonographic Efforts; And By Whose Practical Good-Sense And Wise Teachings I Shall Always Be Profited And Never Forget: •

To My Mother

This Book Is Most Respectfully And Affectionately Dedicated

BY

The Author.

Note. The above dedication was written by the author, Curtis Haven, and was printed in his first edition of this book, since which date the publisher of a garbled shorthand work, has had the audacity to copy above wording in his own book, as if it were original with him. Even a dedication is not sacred with some people.

-Part 1. Explanatory. Necessities To A Practical System Of Phonography
Aside from the ordinary facilities requisite for learning or teaching the art, there are three absolute necessities to a practical system of short-hand writing. They are: speed, legibility, and an alm...
-Phonographers Vs. Stenographers
To classical students and scholars, these two names imply their individual and distinctive meanings. But, it is a singular fact that educated people in general, among whom are actually included some s...
-Shorthand History
The true origin of rapid shorthand writing is involved in doubt. It has been attributed to the ancient Hebrews, the Egyptians, the Chinese, the Greeks, the Romans, and the ancient people of Slavonia, ...
-To About Shorthand Skill In Three Months
It was in 1875, that a young man came to the author and made the astonishing request that he be taught the art of shorthand sufficiently for office use within the space of four weeks, if possible. As ...
-To About Shorthand Skill In Three Months. Continued
These facts, bear in mind, have been demonstrated in the cases of thousands of students, and herewith, within the covers of this book, we have a proof of how this result may be achieved by any teacher...
-Three Months' Routine Of Haven Colleges
Qualification in three months' day course in Shorthand, requires that the student shall devote all of his or her five hours of day sessions, to Shorthand study and practice, except that set apart for ...
-First Month. The Lessons
The first step, when the day Shorthand student arrives at 9 a. m., is to explain to him or her the first lesson of this Complete Manual of Practical Phonography, the teacher showing student how to pra...
-Each Student Taught Separately
All explanation and dictation of lessons is individual, not in class-each student being taught separately from first lesson to the last. Careful watch is given to see that students thoroughly practic...
-Second Month. Reviews, Etc
As soon as the Shorthand student has satisfactorily recited the twelfth lesson of our Complete Manual of Practical Phonography, he or she is directed to review all those lessors by covering the shorth...
-Speed Practice
The order of dictation at each morning shorthand speed class of one hour, is as follows : First, One of the A to K Reviews of the Shorthand manual; d, Dictation of Business Letters of the Sherthand ma...
-Gaining Speed
In afternoon speed class of 40 minutes, the order of dictation is : -First, Reading Court or Convention pages from Shorthand manual arranged for that day, as explained farther on; d, Dictation for not...
-The A To K Reviews
These speed class Reviews are shown on pages 118 to 137 of the Shorthand manual, and one of them begins each morning speed class and each night speed class, unless there should happen to be no student...
-Thoroughness Our Object
Whenever there are more than three errors made in any A to K Review, that Review must be taken again when it reoccurs ten day or night sessions later, and so on as many times as necessary to get each ...
-Business Letter Dictation
When the student is through the second reviewing of the shorthand lessons, he or she is told to study carefully the two business letters shown at top of pages 144 and 145 of the Shorthand manual, repr...
-Third Month. Actual Work
The Business Letters of the Shorthand manual which the student has not finished at the end of second month, he or she continues with this third month, until the 18th day of Business Letters of page 15...
-Court And Convention Practice
When the 18th day of Business Letters of page 159 of the Shorthand manual is satisfactorily completed, the student is directed to again review the twelve Lessons of the Shorthand manual exactly as don...
-The Speed Pamphlets
As before stated, we conclude all our speed classes, when a lecture does not intervene, with the reading of the business letters, court and convention pages from a collection of 27 of our little ten-c...
-Test For Graduation
As soon as a student has acquired sufficient facility to read back promptly two or three letters at several speed classes without a mistake or hesitancy, then the teacher dictates three actual letters...
-That Word "System"
The public sometimes use the word system as though each book on phonography had nothing in common with the others,when the fact is that they are all built from the same parent stem and each simply r...
-Preliminary Information For The Student
It is necessary that the student be impressed with the fact that he is to write only by sound. It should be borne in mind that the phonographic signs given in the lessons are not substitutes for the l...
-300-Words-A-Minute
The lessons of this book were originally known as Haven's 300-Words-a-Minute Shorthand Lessons, and the author has been severely criticised for using that title, his critics claiming that the public...
-Part II. The Instructor. Lesson I. Definition
Shorthand writing is of two kinds-stenography and phonography. Stenography was the shorthand of the ancients, and is not much in use today. It involves the learning of hundreds of arbitrary signs for...
-Practical Phonography
The elements of Haven's Practical Phonography are two alphabets, one visible and the other invisible - a portion of the visible alphabet being presented in the following sixteen signs: The first co...
-Spelling By Position
The invisible alphabet also need not necessarily be altogether presented in this first lesson, but its use and three of its letters are best given. The invisible alphabet is really a method of spellin...
-Lesson II. Timely Suggestions
Become perfectly familiar with one lesson before another is attempted. A careful revision each day of the exercises written on the previous one will prove an invaluable aid to the memory. It is only...
-Small Visible Letters
By the foregoing list of small signs, students are introduced to sixteen more letters of the Visible Alphabet, the three consonants (Hay, Way and Whay), and thirteen visible vowels - each pair of le...
-Pen Or Pencil
Before closing this lesson, there is one subject, the importance of which the author desires to properly impress upon the minds of his students: It is the necessity of an immediate choice between pen ...
-Lesson III. Final List Of Visible Letters
In above final list are presented ten signs - the concluding letters of the Visible Alphabet of Haven's Practical Phonography - the last five - short-o, short-oo, Ah, short-ah and Aw - being vowels;...
-The Complete Visible Alphabet
P B T D Tchay J R Arm. or Rem K Gay F V Ith or Thee S Z Ish or Zhee L M Emb or Emp N lug I Oi A Hay Ow Ai or & Oo Short-i Short - a Way Hway Short - o Short - e E ...
-The Circles S And Z
Rapidity in writing shorthand frequently necessitates, for the representation of the oft-recurring sounds of S and Z, a much shorter method than that found in our Visible Alphabet. A small light circ...
-C, Q And X
There are three letters which students who have had but little experience in spelling by sound will look in vain for among the letters of our Visible Alphabet, viz.: the Roman letters C, Q and X. The ...
-Holding The Pencil
In Lesson I the student is requested, when writing phonography, to hold the pen or pencil between the first and second fingers, merely keeping it in place with the thumb. Most phonographers employ thi...
-Lesson IV. Additional Use Of The Visible Vowels
In words wherein visible vowels are necessary, and where the juncture of a visible vowel with the required consonant or consonants would be difficult or impossible to accomplish, a sign representing a...
-Coalescing Visible Vowels
Besides the preceding described uses for the visible vowels, they are also employed in instances where two vowel sounds together terminate a word, as with the vowel sounds of a and e pronounced termin...
-Visible Vowel Junctures
As it is in only a very few words of our language wherein it is necessary to write vowels, the student will seldom be required to write such cumbrous outlines as predominate this lesson, vowels in gen...
-The Invisible Alphabet
In Lesson I was explained the application of the main principle of the Invisible Alphabet of Haven's Practical Phonography, in indicating the vowel sounds of I, A and U invisibly by writing a consonan...
-Importance Of Spelling By Sound
The main thing is not to forget that phonography means writing by sound. No attention should be paid to ordinary spelling. Keep in mind the fact that the invisible vowel Ow does not mean the letters O...
-Position Vocalization
As in this lesson are represented words having two joined consonants, it is necessary to state that, in general, the invisible vowel sound is indicated by the first consonant of a word, no matter what...
-Lesson V. The Beginning Hooks
While the letter Way is quite correctly joined to Ing, as in sign 2 in Exercise, there is also, in some instances, a much easier and more rapid manner of joining Way or Whay to N and to some other let...
-The Beginning Hooks. Continued
The student should particularly bear in mind that, although, in writing these Per and Pel series of double consonants, they are commenced at the hooks, yet, in reading them, the R or L hook, as the ca...
-Lesson VI. Final Hooks
A small final hook, written on the right-hand side of upright and slanting straight characters, and on the upper side of horizontal ones, represents the addition of either F or V. Signs 1, 3, 5, 7 and...
-The St And Str Loops
A narrow loop, half the length of a full sized consonant and written on the same side of consonant as the circle S or Z is written upon, represents the addition of St or Sd to the main consonant. Sign...
-Lesson VII. The Halving Principle
T and D occur so frequently in words of daily use, and the representation of those letters, by writing their full phonographic outlines, is often so cumbrous, that a shorter way of expressing their so...
-Consonants Of Double And Triple Size
To express the addition of the sounds ter, der, cher and ther, full sized consonants are made twice their usual length. Signs 69 to 90 in Exercise. . This principle is also taken advantage of by exper...
-Invisible Indication Of Preceding Vowels
In one of the paragraphs of Lesson III (Final List Of Visible Letters), the necessity for economy in word outline is incidently referred to, the word lass being used in illustration. By reference to t...
-Lesson VIII
There are a small number of brief words in our language, mostly one-syllabled, whose frequent occurrence and consequent rapid utterance precludes the possibility of writing them, even phonetically, as...
-The Word - Signs
Of To Or But The On An All Two Too Already Before Ought Who Whom The above list of word-signs, being entirely arbitrary, students must not expect to find in them any element of previo...
-The Word - Signs. Part 2
If the sign for the be always written upwards in junctures and he always written downwards, notwithstanding they are both the same sign, they can never clash, as will be seen by comparing sign 4, all ...
-The Word - Signs. Part 3
To avoid confliction with half-length consonants, always write these word-signs, and all visible vowels, about one-eighth the size of a full-sized consonant; in other words, write them as small as pos...
-Points To Remember
Devote as much time to reading as to writing phonography. Write the Exercises contained within these lessons, over and over again, even after you have become perfectly familiar with them. They contai...
-Lesson IX. Common Abbreviations
Up,party,patent Hope Be,been,object To be Time,what It,take At,out,took Dollar Do Had,today,to do do Each Which,change Much,charge Jesus Advantage Large Your Our, hour Kingdom, common Can,came Co...
-Common Abbreviations. Continued
Signs 58 and 59, in Exercise, show how the word-abbreviations help to distinguish between letters that are attached to them, those two outlines, although one begins with a letter of the alphabet, the ...
-Lesson X
A list of word-abbreviations containing either beginning or final hooks is presented in table on opposite page. Learn them as directed for the Word-Signs of Lesson VIII, and the Common Abbreviations o...
-Hooked Abbreviations
People,appeal Apply Principle-al-ly Appear Belong Able,belief.believe Liberty Re-member Brother,number Till,tell Until Truth Deliver Doctor Dear Angel Danger Call,equal-ly Difficul...
-Words Indicated By Hooks
As Emb is frequently employed in professional work to represent the words may be, sign 3 in Exercise, Way-Emb may be quite as readily employed for the phrase we may be, sign 3 in Exercise. This is on ...
-Sound Syllables
In words of not very frequent occurrence. A proper appreciation of the sound syllables of language is a great aid to students in building cut-lines for infrequently occurring words, and it is, therefo...
-Ns Versus S
The small circle S, when occurring in such junctures as task (sign 83 in Exercise) is frequently misunderstood, until its formation is properly explained, to be an Ns circle. While its shape is exactl...
-Respecting Practice
A plan of practice in writing which will much accelerate the student's proficiency, is that of practicing in precisely the same manner a regular phonographic reporter works. To accomplish this object,...
-Lesson XI. Compound Abbreviations
Speak,speech Special-ly Spiritual-ly Person Peculiar Perform Business Subject Strength External-ly Construct Satisfy System Extreme-ity Strange Instruct-ed Ctilize Advertisement Ad...
-Phrase Positions
The general rule with most phonographers, when joining words, is to write the first word in its proper place-position, and let the other words in the phrase accommodate themselves to the position of t...
-Words Commencing With X And Q
The compound sounds of the English letters X and Q-prove the most difficult for the student to analyse when writing English words in which those sounds occur, or writing English words spelled with tho...
-Expediencies
The word it may often be readily expressed by halving the last full-length consonant of a preceding word, as in signs 132 and 133. Many word-signs may also be halved to represent the addition of it, w...
-Expediencies. Continued
Exercise XI 99. These differences and many others which the student should carefully note, are plainly shown in this Exercise. It will be noticed that in sign 119 the preposition to is omitted in ...
-Lesson XII. Half-Length Abbreviations
Between Body Beauty,about Quit-e God After Thought Without Throughout On either hand On the other hand Establish-ed-ment Astonish-ed-ment Met Immediate-ly Not ,Nature-d .Tonight ...
-The Numerals
The cipher 1 2. 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 1Oo 200 300 400 500 700 800 1000 2000. 3000 4000 5000 6000 8000 9000 1,000,000 2,000,000 3,000,000 4,000,000 5,000,000...
-Proper Names And Initials
The writing in shorthand of proper names and initials being a necessary element to speed in shorthand, since no person can write a proper name in long-hand quickly enough to do verbatim reporting, par...
-Syllable Abbreviation
An efficient means of avoiding some very cumbrous written forms is that of abbreviating the phonographic outlines of a number of the prefixes and affixes of our language. And, as this method of syllab...
-Prefixes
Con, Com or Cog. These short prefixes (as one is not at all likely ever to clash with either of the others) are represented by the same sign -the consonant outline K, which is joined as in signs 111 t...
-Affixes
Bl , Bly or Bility are represented by the phonographic stroke B, as in signs 180 to 183. Bleness, by joining a letter N and circle S to the letter B, as in sign 182. For or Fore as affixes, and Ful, ...
-The Use Of The Prefixes And Affixes
In making use of the phonographic prefixes and affixes students are probably more apt to lose sight of the two grand principles of phonographic writing-sound-spelling and outline-brevity - than in any...
-Phrase Combinations
Beginning with signs 205, 206, 207 and 240 in this Exercise, and ending with sign 307, are given a number of phrase combinations, sometimes made up of word-abbreviations, joined often with unimportant...
-Omitted Words
One of the most frequently occurring words in the English language is the word to, and, as it requires almost as much time to write as a much longer word, the author, early in his professional experie...
-Punctuation
Professional shorthand writers punctuate by leaving spaces. Others more precise, make use, in particular work, of signs which cannot clash with their phonographic symbols. The vowel indication of othe...
-Repeated Words
When a speaker repeats the same phrase several times in a sentence, the phonographer may make use of an extra long waved line to denote the repeated words in their re-occurrence instead of re-writing ...
-Review Exercises
Twenty pages, (commencing with page 118 and ending with page 137) are herein devoted to reviews of the principles contained in the preceding lessons, by means of words and phrases for the most part di...
-Review Exercise A
I, ought; 2, galley; 3, women; 4, In the United States District Court; 5, United States; 6, attains; 7, plaintiff's machine; 8, noses; 9, twelve; 10, which ought to have; It, yell; 12, would a; 13, d...
-Review Exercise B
1 was it; 2; hunger-ry; 3, at the present moment; 4, felt; 5, signature; 6, how; 7, get; 8,I am in receipt of your favor of the 13th 9, Rem; 10, internal revenue; 11, earn; 12, tirade; [instant; 13, ...
-Review Exercise C
1, racings; 2, open; 3, may it please your honor; 4, exstacy;-5, who; 6, candle; 7, clay; 8, in the popular acceptation of the term, 9, will; 10, learned; 11, woman; 12, unseasoned; 13, chanced; 14, ...
-Review Exercise D
1, seventh; 2, we will not have been; 3, armed; 4, please; 5, has it; 6, going; 7, hiss; 8, in the United States Patent Office; 9, H (the initial); 10, Dunlap; II, which had (would) not; 12, whip; 13...
-Review Exercise E
1, Jehovah; 2, stood; 3, industry of the times; 4, turn; 5, doing; 6, German; 7, balm; 8,1 have no doubt of it; 9, caution; 10, it had (would) not; II, dark; 12, meeting; 13, the cipher; 14, Louisa; ...
-Review Exercise F
1, glorified; 2, in that; 3, claim; 4, I think you must; 5, however; 6, of its; 7, Yours of today's mail received; 8, hazy; 9, dealer; 10, it is very necessary; 11, song; 12, sprain; 13, imagine; 14,...
-Review Exercise G
1, where; 2, valley; 3, real; 4, such (would) have had; 5, advertisement; 6, vain; 7, it is entirely your own; 8, retail; 9, govern; 10, importer; n,imposter; 12, ornamental; 13, whatever; 14, I have...
-Review Exercise H
I, F (the initial); 2, from it; 3, asked; 4, gradual-ly; 5, twelfth; 6, Berlin; 7, weep; 8, we may not know them; 9, workman; 10, herself; 11, whichever (have); 12, sizes; 13, necessary; 14, numbered...
-Review Exercise J
1, number; 2, bought; 3, desk; 4, I shall not have you; 5, fourteenth; 6, creative; 7, you will do; 8, filial; 9, universality; 10, they would; 11, place; 12, thorough; 13, consequent; 14, heartily; ...
-Review Exercise K
I, spiritually; 2, under the circumstances; 3, glee; 4, nebula; 5, N (the initial); 6, we; 7, sip; 8, Your letter bearing date of the 9, do; 10, as such; 11, I shall not; 12, class; [15th instant at h...
-About People Who Give You Shorthand Advice
Any professional writer of any system, providing that writer has done court and convention reporting, is competent to give good advice respecting study and practice ; but, as far as best outlines are ...
-Part III. The Reader. General Directions
This portion of the book is intended for both reading and writing practice, the printed pages being the key to the shorthand engraving opposite them. Students should, therefore, not cease studying the...
-Business Letter Practice
The letters, given on pages 144 to 159 in this portion of the book, numbering 36 in all, two each day for 18 days, have been graded, the smallest ones first, for the purpose of enabling students to le...
-Business Letter Practice. Part 2
The printed keys to the letters in this part of the book are not arranged in the manner in which those letters are intended to be written on a typewriting machine. In this book, the arrangement of the...
-Business Letter Practice. Part 3
Mr. A. R. Johnson, Memphis, Ind. Dear Sir: - We have your favor of the 4th instant, ordering shade rollers, and have shipped same to-day. We cannot send with them the full assortment of brackets nam...
-Business Letter Practice. Part 4
The Patent Ramrod Mfg. Co., Montgomery City, Mo. Gentlemen: - Absence in Philadelphia has prevented an earlier reply to your favor of the first of May, received at Chicago a few days after I had star...
-Business Letter Practice. Part 5
Messrs Z. I. Gypson & Co., Box S, Melbourne, Australia. Gentlemen: - We have your letter dated November 19th acknowledging our remittance of $32.87 in settlement of bill of September 2d, signed Z. ...
-Actual Court Cases
A great many young shorthand writers hesitate to enter the field of law reporting, and even to accept an occasional case when offered them, for fear their lack of knowledge of law forms will prevent t...
-The Reporting
Having entered on time, the reporter should, if the trial is to be held in a court room, take his place at one of the tables within the enclos ure, as near in front of the judge's desk as possible, ju...
-The Reporting. Continued
This was, however, always a matter of serious concern to the author, and it is to these known deficiencies in all other systems, even in the hands of the greatest stenographers of the age, that Haven'...
-The Transcription
The first thing to be done in makinga transcription of evidence, is to make a heading of the form of those shown in the printed pages throughout the court cases in this department of the book, the par...
-The Transcription. Continued
The index, whether it is placed on the title page or not, follows the title and contains columns for the witnesses' names, and for the placing of the page number whereon will be found the Direct Exami...
-Index
Witnesses. Direct Exam. Cross Exam. Re-Direct Exam. ' Re-Cross Exam. For Commonwealth. Edward E. Charles - 1 17 19 William Butler - F...
-First Day. John Williams Vs. Daily News Co
Court Of Common Pleas. Before Judge Alfred Marshall. Case No. 49. Trenton, N. J., May 3, 1856. For the plaintiff appears Hon. J. L. Simons. For the defendant appear Messrs. Black and Strong. John ...
-Second Day. William Jones Vs. State Insurance Ass'N
Court Of Common Pleas. - Before Judge James Parsons. Case No. 506. Camden, N. J., January 5, 1821. For the plaintiff appears Samuel R. Taylor, Esq. For the defendant appear Messrs. Walters and Harve...
-Third Day. Franklin B. Mills Vs. John B. Henry
Court Of Common Pleas Before Judge Wm. C. Albright. Case No. 2506. Philadelphia, Nov. 29, 1831. Appearances: G. H. Lewis, Esq., for plaintiff. Henry Darcy, Esq., for defendant. Franklin B. Mills, t...
-Fourth Day. United States Vs. Murphy Et Al
U. S. District Court, For The Northern District Of Illinois. Before Judge Bee. [No Jury.] Case No. 6754. Chicago, June 20, 1880. Second Day-Morning Session MR. Kost continuing his testimony of the ...
-Fifth Day. Malcom Jackson Vs. Daniel C. Kain
Court Of Common Pleas. Before Judge D. D. Severns. Case No. 6i. January Term, 1874. Pittsburg, Penn., April 2, 1874. For the plaintiff appear Messrs. Kelly and Leach. For the defendant appears Mr. B...
-Sixth Day. In The Matter Of The Probate Of A Paper Propounded As A Codicil To The Last Will And Testament Of Charles Carter, Deceased
Surrogate's Court, County of Camden, State of N. J. Before Hon. H. M. Finter, Surrogate. Camden, N. J., May 15, 1852. For the proponent appears Mr. Peter Day. For the contestants appear Messrs. ...
-Seventh Day. Commonwealth Vs. George Beckett Etal
Court Of Oyer And Terminer County of Philadelphia, Penn. Samuel Campbell, P. J. Philadelphia, Penn., October 11, 1855. Prosecutor William Matlack for the Commonwealth. A. Carpenter and R. L. Kerr, E...
-Eighth Day. Philadelphia, Oct. 12, 1855
Second Day- Morning Session. MR. George E. Krouse sworn. Direct Examination By Mr. Matlack: State your residence and business, Mr. Krouse. A. I live at 474 North Street, and am a wholesale wine an...
-Ninth Day. George Binder Vs. Henry T. Nagle
Common Pleas Court. Before Judge James Atkinson. Case No. 305 New York, N. Y., Nov. 6. 1845 Samuel S. Stover, for plaintiff. Charles Willard and Marcus Tooler, for defendant. Testimony For Plaintif...
-Tenth Day. Second Day. New York, N. Y., Nov. 6, 1845
Testimony For The Defense. Henry T. Nagle, the defendant, sworn in his own behalf. Direct Examination By Mr. Willard: Q. This promissory note, for two hundred and ninety-eight dollars and fifty-sev...
-Charge Of The Court
Gentlemen of the Jury - This is an action of Assumpsit, brought by George Binder. the plaintiff, against Henry T. Nagle, the defendant. The plaintiff seeks in this action to recover from the defendant...
-Convention Reporting
Amanuensis work and court reporting, have been illustrated and explained to some extent by other authors; not, however, nearly so thoroughly as in this work, and convention reporting has never, to the...
-First Day
The first day's session of the American Institute of Architects was held on the evening of the 20th of October, at the Recital Hall of the Auditorium, Chicago. Convention called to order at 8.15 o'cl...
-Proceedings Of The National Wholesale Druggists Association, In Convention, At The Arlington Hotel, Washington, D. C
--o-- September 29, 30: October 1, 2, 3 , 1890. Index First Day Proceedings. - Evening Session. Pages. Reception of Delegates from Kindred Associations------- 4 to 20 Tuesday. - Morning Sessi...
-Regular Monthly Meeting Of The Chicago Paint, Oil, And Varnish Club At The Rooms Of The Union League, Chicago, Ill
Thursday, October 17, 1889. Dinner at 6:00 p. m. Thirty members present. Meeting called to order at 7:30 o'clock by President G. H. Vrooman. The President - The meeting will please come to order. W...
-Meeting Of The Chicago Paint, Oil, And Varnish Club. Part 2
The President - You have heard the resolution read. What action is to be taken? [Several members seconded it.] It is moved and seconded that the resolution just read be adopted. Are there any remarks?...
-Meeting Of The Chicago Paint, Oil, And Varnish Club. Part 3
Mr. Pettet - I move that the By-Laws be changed to read the third Thursday instead of the second. Mr. Coffin - I second the motion. The President - The motion is that our By-Laws be so amended that ...
-Meeting Of The Chicago Paint, Oil, And Varnish Club. Part 4
There are such men. But, as I said, their occupation is pretty much gone, and it is well it is so. I am glad to see a meeting of this kind to-night. You, gentlemen, are no doubt engaged in sharp rival...
-Meeting Of The Chicago Paint, Oil, And Varnish Club. Part 5
Vice-President Haines - Mr. President and Gentlemen: I thank you for the honor you have conferred upon me by electing me to the vice-presidency of this Club. Had I been present at the meeting at which...
-Meeting Of The Chicago Paint, Oil, And Varnish Club. Part 6
Several Voices - Wadsworth! Wadsworth! Let us hear from Wadsworth! Mr. Wadsworth - Mr. President: I have need to congratulate the Club upon the character of the new officers elected and the way in ...
-Explanatory Notes
On these pages, 261 to 270, we present an exact fac-simile, as it appeared in a Chicago trade-newspaper, of the convention or meeting which we have given in full on pages 234 to 259. It is shown on th...
-Explanatory Notes. Part 2
The regular business of the meeting being at an end, and miscellaneous business being in order, Mr. Rosenthal presented a resolution requesting the Executive Committee to lay before the next regular m...
-Explanatory Notes. Part 3
carry forward with greater ease the reforms which should be the object and aim and interests of this Club. We hope to prosper so that in 1892, when the paint trade of New York, Washington and St. Loui...
-Explanatory Notes. Part 4
I was very glad to hear of a remark made by Senator Sherman the other night, in which he was bold enough to say that lowed by three lines describing the applause and introductory words of President Vr...
-Explanatory Notes. Part 5
I think you will all agree with me that in the past, where there has [been a provision made with a jobber for a profit, there has been more or less anxiety on the part of some of the jobbers to divide...
-Speech Reporting
The reporting of orations. sermons, legal arguments, addresses, etc., all of which are included under the one general term of Speech Reporting, is of .a nature which sometimes taxes the skill of the r...
-A Lecture By Francis Murphy, The Temperance Orator
This portion of the book would scarcely be complete without an illustration of the speed which Practical Phonography is capable of when highest speed may be needed. To this end we give below a verbati...
-A Lecture By Francis Murphy, The Temperance Orator. Continued
The Chairman. - Mr. Murphy, you have only three minutes to catch the boat Three minutes! Well, I will have to come over to Camden and live here for a week. It is a great cross to go away from this ...
-Part IV. The Vocabulary. To The Student
Notwithstanding that the best way to gain a perfect knowledge of shorthand is to learn perfectly every lesson given in this book, together with the shorthand plates of the business letters, court test...
-Books
Haven's Complete Text Books / Practical Phonography - - - $2.00 Actual Bookkeeping - - - 1.50 Modern Journalism ... 1.00 Business Correspondence Including Typewriting, P...









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