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The Compendium Of Tachygraphy: Or Lindsley's Phonetic Shorthand



This new system has already found its way into all parts of the country. Its amazing simplicity and practicability, everywhere conceded, are applauded most enthusiastically by those who have spent years in a fruitless endeavor to master the intricacies of Phonography.

TitleThe Compendium Of Tachygraphy: Or Lindsley's Phonetic Shorthand
AuthorD. P. Lindsley
PublisherD. P. Lindsley
Year1865
Copyright1865, D. P. Lindsley
AmazonThe compendium of tachygraphy: Or, Lindsley's phonetic shorthand

Explaining And Illustrating The Common Style Of The Art

"Now what natural obstacle is there against the formation of written signs, which will be indefinitely shorter than that which constitutes the English Language, or the Language of any other people ? * * * Let the system of written signs be reduced to a brevity and simplicity corresponding with that of spoken sound, and there is no reason why the hand should not be able to keep up with the voice, and a man write as fast as he can speak." - Horace, Mann.

-Lindsley's Phonetic Short-Hand
This new system has already found its way into all parts of the country. Its amazing simplicity and practicability, everywhere conceded, are applauded most enthusiastically by those who have spent yea...
-Preface
The new System of Phonetic Short-hand, which we have partially developed in the following pages, is the result of a protracted effort to conform the system of Mr. Isaac Pitman to the beauty of its the...
-Library Sets
But what are the characteristics of a system that will supply the demand? We answer, It must be scientific, simple, legible, and brief. 1. No contrivances of contraction, however ingenious, can eve...
-Preface To The Second Edition
The favor with which the first edition has been received, in spite of many imperfections, is a gratifying assurance that we have secured, in a great measure, that practicability in short-hand that so ...
-The Proper Method Of Study
The rapidity of progress in short-hand will depend very much on the method of study. It is not necessary that all should follow the same course, in all its minutest details; but the same general princ...
-The Alphabet Of Tachygraphy, Or Lindsley's Phonetic Short Hand. Consonantal Signs
SIGN. NAME. SOUND. Be, b in bay. Pe, p in pay. ...
-Chapter I. The Use Of The Simple Signs
Our common writing has two defects: first, the complexity of its letters; second, the irregularity of their use. 1. The letters have each from three to five, six, or seven inflections; that is, the...
-Chapter II. Our Common Orthography
Letters were originally designed to represent sounds, and the natural theory was to have a letter for each elementary sound used in the language. The letters of the Greek alphabet represent the sounds...
-Section 2. Sounds Represented By Two Letters
There are, in the English language, twenty-four consonantal sounds and only twenty-one letters that are ever used to express them. Of these C, Q, and X are useless, because they represent 6ounds alrea...
-Section 3. Irregularities Of Vowels
All the vowels in the common orthography are irregular. They each represent more than one sound. lindsley's phonetic short-hand. A has six Bounds, - along sound, as in hate; a short sound in hat...
-Chapter III. Phonetic Orthography
Pure phonography provides one sign, and one only, for each sound in the language, and represents each sound invariably by its appropriate sign. When a person has thoroughly learned the characters empl...
-Section 1. Double Letters
Pronounce each word slowly, and mark the sounds accurately. Omit all silent letters. Very few double letters occur in spoken English. Such words as attain, attack, etc., contain but one t; adding, bid...
-Section 2. Suppressed Letters
Avoid the omission or suppression of any letter that is really sounded. Some erroneously write f-ah-m for farm, cod (cand), for cord, etc. Those who have been in the habit of writing the old phonograp...
-Section 4. Wh, Qu, Etc
Wh (sounded hw) has a sign appropriated to it by which it is uniformly represented. Ha-Wa would not be an exact equivalent, if their use was convenient. Qu is represented by Ka-Wa; but it should be no...
-Chapter IV. Direction Of The Signs
The general principles detailed in the preceding chapters should be studied and understood. The student should now learn the alphabet, following the directions given below. Section 1. Direction Of ...
-Section. 2. Connection Of Signs
1. All the signs that compose a word must be joined together, except some vocal signs, as hereafter specified. The dot is never joined. The dashes are disjoined whenever they do not form an angle with...
-Section 3. The Position Of Disjoined Vowels
1. A disjoined vowel is written on the left of a perpendicular or inclined stroke, if it precedes; it if it follows, on the right; it is written above a horizontal stroke, when preceding, below when f...
-Section 4. Short Vowels
Were the pupil supposed to understand the sounds of the letters accurately, further illustrations might be spared. The distinction between the long and short sounds of the vowels will need some attent...
-Section 5. Position Of Outlines
The first perpendicular or inclined consonant in a word must rest on the line of writing. Those that follow, take their own proper directions on the line, above, or below it, - as the case may be. It ...
-Section 6. The Union Of Letters Without Angles
Both consonants and vocal signs may often unite without an angle. This adds to the facility of the writing; both letters should be struck as though they were one. But all angles are determined by stri...
-Chapter V. Section 1. Compound Sounds And Signs
The vocal diphthongs I, Ew, Oi, and Ow are represented by compound signs. These signs have a relation to the signs of the simple sounds. In analogy with this, we use signs for certain combinations of ...
-Section 2. Compounds Of The Eland Ra Scries In Final Syllables
1. The final syllables of feeble, local, paper, rightful, leader, water, etc., contain no vocal sound; yet the consonants do not unite as closely as they do in initial syllables. The use of the compou...
-Section 3. Triphthongal Combinations
In the tripbthongal combinations, spr, str, skr, and spl, s is written with the long sign, and pr, tr, kr, and pl are treated as compounds. Reading Exercise 3. Remark. - These and other compound si...
-Section 4. The Circle Between Two Consonants
When the circle comes between two consonants forming an angle, it is written on the outside of the angle; or, more explicitly, there are three eases: first, when the circle comes between two straight ...
-Chapter VI. Shortened Forms
We have given, in the preceding chapters, all the principles that are essential in writing the common style of the art. Considerable increase of speed may, however, be effected by observing the follow...
-Section 2. Omission Of Vowels
1. The common style of the system may be written with perfect accuracy with the omission of no vowels; but the adept will increase his speed without sacrificing legibility, by omitting those vowels th...
-Section 3. Facileness Of Form
1. The doctrine of angles needs much attention. An acute angle is better than an obtuse. See Chapter IV (Direction Of The Signs). Section G. By the proper use of the vowels and vowel hooks, the compou...
-Chapter VII. Phrase Signs
1. A great increase of speed in writing is effected by the use of connective vocal signs. A similar advantage is gained by connecting several words into the same outline. Such phrases as of the, on th...
-Chapter VIII. Uniformity Of Outline. Section 1. L, M, And R
It is, if not of prime necessity, yet of no little importance to the writer, that he use the same form for the same word at all times. A difference of outline will not render the reading necessarily o...
-Section 2. Tha And Tha
In the Literary Style, we use the signs named tha and tha, for the German sounds of ch and g (final). Since, however, we use them in the reporting style, in certain eaten, for distinction, and to form...
-Chapter IX. Speed In Writing
Section 1. Punctuation The same rules for punctuation obtain that are used in ordinary writing and printing, and the same characters are employed. The dash, however, commences with a waved line to ...
-A Partial Key To The Reading Exercises
[The figures refer to the line] Reading Exercise First 1. Ape, ache, pay, gay, day. Be, fee, she, thee, key, see. Coo, co, caw, dough, toe, daw. Oat. 2. Me, may, nay, know, shay, show, etc. 1...
-Recommendations
From the Boston Cultivator. Of the coming great reform in written language, there can be no more doubt than of its universal need, and in future we shall be glad to be counted among its earliest frie...
-Terms Of Instruction In Phonetic Short-Hand
One Month (20 Lessons in Class)....... $10.00 Full course in the Common Style of Tachygraphy, time unlimited, . 25.00 Easy Reporting Style, .................................................. 50....
-A New System Of Phonetic Short-Hand
The author of this system was a writer and teacher of Mr. Pitman's Phonography for several years. Learning from long experience that it was impossible to give his pupils any skill in that art without ...
-Answers To Inquiries
What use can I make of Tachygraphy? Why, my Dear Sir! What use do you make of Longhand? Use Tachygraphy for the same purposes - for keeping book accounts in your business, and business memoranda - f...
-Lessons Without A Teacher
Can I learn the art without a teacher? I can not tell you. Very few are sufficiently self-reliant to persevere with an art or science alone; and if you could succeed alone, you can succeed in half t...
-Testimonials In Favor Of Tachygraphy
From Rev. William Pittenger, of Cadiz Ohio, author of Daring and Suffering, or the Great Railroad Adventure. I had labored so long at Phonography, devoting to it during a period of seven years en...









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