books



previous page: Sense And Sensibility | by Jane Austen
  
page up: Novels
  
next page: Windsor Castle | by William Harrison Ainsworth

Old Saint Paul's. A Tale Of The Plague And The Fire | by William Harrison Ainsworth



The portion of the ensuing Tale relating to the Grocer of Wood-street, and his manner of victualling his house, and shutting up himself and his family within it during the worst part of the Plague of 1665, is founded on a narrative, which I have followed pretty closely in most of its details, contained in a very rare little volume, entitled, "Preparations against the Plague, both of Soul and Body", the authorship of which I have no hesitation in assigning to Defoe. Indeed, I venture to pronounce it his masterpiece. It is strange that this matchless performance should have hitherto escaped attention, and that it should not have been reprinted with some one of the countless impressions of the ""History of the Plague of London"," to which it forms an almost necessary accompaniment. The omission, I trust, will be repaired by Mr. Hazlitt the younger, Defoe's last and best editor, in his valuable edition of the works of that great novelist and political writer, now in the course of publication. It may be added, that a case precisely similar to that of the Grocer, and attended with the same happy results, occurred during the Plague of Marseilles, in 1720.

TitleOld Saint Paul's. A Tale Of The Plague And The Fire
AuthorWilliam Harrison Ainsworth
PublisherH. Cunningham
Year1841
Copyright1841, William Harrison Ainsworth
AmazonOld Saint Paul's

For my acquaintance with this narrative, as well as for the suggestion of its application to the present purpose, I am indebted to my friend, Mr. JAMES CROSSLEY, of Manchester.

KENSAL MANOR HOUSE, HARROW ROAD, "November" 30, 1841.

-Book The First. April, 1665. I. The Grocer Of Wood-Street And His Family
One night, at the latter end of April, 1665, the family of a citizen of London carrying on an extensive business as a grocer in Wood-street, Cheapside, were assembled, according to custom, at prayer. ...
-The Grocer Of Wood-Street And His Family. Part 2
Hitherto, the city had escaped. The destroyer had not passed Ludgate or Newgate, but environed the walls like a besieging enemy. A few days, however, before the opening of this history, fine weather h...
-The Grocer Of Wood-Street And His Family. Part 3
Do not fly me, Amabel, he cried, in an impassioned tone, but suffer me to declare the love I have for you. I cannot live without you. Amabel, whose neck and cheeks were crimsoned with blushes, ca...
-The Grocer Of Wood-Street And His Family. Part 4
We will see that, sir, exclaimed Mrs. Bloundel, angrily. What, ho! son Stephen! Leonard Holt! I say. This gentleman will stay here, whether I like or not. Show him forth. That I will, right wi...
-The Grocer Of Wood-Street And His Family. Part 5
Leonard, she whispered, I promised to tell you when I should next meet Maurice Wyvil. He will be here to-night. And without giving him time to answer, she retired. For awhile, Leonard remained in...
-II. The Coffin-Maker
The first shock over, the grocer bore the affliction manfully, and like one prepared for it. Exhibiting little outward emotion, though his heart was torn with anguish, and acting with the utmost calmn...
-The Coffin-Maker. Part 2
Blaize promised obedience, adding in a supplicating tone, Leonard, if I were you, I would not go to the Examiner of Health. Poor Stephen may not have the plague, after all. It's a dreadful thing to b...
-The Coffin-Maker. Part 3
Impelled by curiosity, Leonard paused for a moment to listen, and heard him thunder forth the following denunciation: -- And now, therefore, as the prophet Jeremiah saith, 'I have this day declared i...
-The Coffin-Maker. Part 4
Yes, here I am, Mother Malmayns, replied one of the men in black cloaks, looking up as he spoke, and exhibiting features so hideous, and stamped with such a revolting expression, that Leonard's bloo...
-The Coffin-Maker. Part 5
At a little distance from him, upon a bench, sat a stout, shrewd-looking, but benevolent little personage, somewhat between forty and fifty. This was Doctor Hodges. He had a lancet in his hand, with w...
-The Coffin-Maker. Part 6
No further opposition being offered, Hodges, followed by the apprentice, marched towards an inner room. Just as he reached the door, a burst of loud laughter, evidently proceeding from a numerous part...
-III. The Gamester And The Bully
Before proceeding further, it will be necessary to retrace our steps for a short time, and see what was done by Maurice Wyvil after the alarming announcement made to him by the apprentice. Of a selfis...
-The Gamester And The Bully. Part 2
The last of the three, whose looks betrayed his character -- that of a sharper and a bully -- called himself Major Pillichody, his pretensions to military rank being grounded upon his service (so ran ...
-The Gamester And The Bully. Part 3
It is false! replied Disbrowe, fiercely, I accept it. And producing a key, he threw it on the table. My life is, in truth, set on the die, he added, with a desperate look -- for if I lose, I wi...
-IV. The Interview
Maurice Wyvil, as his friends conjectured, had found his way into the house. Creeping through the window, and entering a passage, he moved noiselessly along till he reached the head of the kitchen sta...
-The Interview. Continued
I have been greatly to blame, dear mother, returned Amabel, bursting into tears; and I shall neither seek to exculpate myself, nor conceal what I have done. I have deceived you and my father. I hav...
-V. The Pomander-Box
Any doubts entertained by Leonard Holt as to the manner in which his rival entered the house, were removed by discovering the open window in the passage and the rope-ladder hanging to the yard-wall. T...
-The Pomander-Box. Part 2
You neither lance nor cauterize an incipient tumour, do you, doctor? demanded Blaize, without abandoning his position. Eh, day! exclaimed Hodges, have we one of the faculty here? I see how it is...
-The Pomander-Box. Part 3
Blaize would have remonstrated, and asked for some explanation, but the apprentice instantly left him, and set out upon his errand to the Examiner of Health. Accompanied by his mother, who would not e...
-VI. The Libertine Punished
Sir Paul Parravicin and Major Pillichody arrived without any particular adventure at the top of the Haymarket, where the former dismissed the coach he had hired in Cheapside, and they proceeded toward...
-"Margaret."
Charming creature! exclaimed Parravicin, as the paper dropped from his hand; she little dreamed, when she wrote it, who would read her billet. Disbrowe does not deserve such a treasure. I am sorry ...
-VII. The Plague Nurse
And so my husband has got the plague, muttered Mother Malmayns, as she hastened towards Saint Paul's, after the reproof she had received from Doctor Hodges. Well, it's a disorder that few recover f...
-The Plague Nurse. Part 2
Lord help us! cried the crone, I hope it will spare me. I thought my age secured me. Quite the reverse, replied Judith, desirous of exciting her mother-in-law's terrors; quite the reverse. You...
-The Plague Nurse. Part 3
Ah! roared Malmayns, raising himself in bed, as he perceived her, are you come back again, you she-devil? Where is my mother? Where is Kerrich? What have you done with them? They have both got t...
-VIII. The Mosaical Rods
In pursuance of their design of seeking out an astrologer, Maurice Wyvil and Lydyard crossed Cheapside and entered Friday-street. They had not proceeded far, when they perceived a watchman standing be...
-The Mosaical Rods. Continued
Juggler! exclaimed Wyvil between his teeth. I am no juggler! replied Lilly, angrily; and to prove I am not, I will tell you who you are who thus insult me, though you have not announced yoursel...
-IX. The Miniature
According to his promise, Doctor Hodges visited the grocer's house early on the following day, and the favourable opinion he had expressed respecting Stephen Bloundel was confirmed by the youth's appe...
-The Miniature. Part 2
As I live, I am, she replied. But you recognise the likeness? I do, returned Hodges. It is the portrait of one whose vices and depravity are the town's cry, and whose name coupled with that of...
-The Miniature. Part 3
You have arrived at a seasonable juncture, Leonard, observed Mrs. Bloundel, noticing the apprentice's perplexity, and anxious to relieve it. We have just discovered that the person calling himself ...
-X. The Duel
After Parravicin's terrible announcement, Disbrowe offered him no further violence, but, flinging down his sword, burst open the door, and rushed upstairs. His wife was still insensible, but the fatal...
-Book The Second. May, 1665. I. Progress Of The Pestilence
Towards the middle of May, the bills of mortality began to swell greatly in amount, and though but few were put down to the plague, and a large number to the spotted fever (another frightful disorder ...
-Progress Of The Pestilence. Part 2
The unfortunate man's wife and child were removed the following night in the dead-cart, and, driven half-mad by grief and terror, he broke open the door of his dwelling, and, plunging a sword in the w...
-Progress Of The Pestilence. Part 3
Bloundel received a visit from the Lord Mayor, Sir John Lawrence, who, having been informed of his conduct, came to express his high approval of it, offering to remit the few days yet unexpired of his...
-II. In What Manner The Grocer Victualled His House
Leonard Holt was wrong in his suspicions. Amabel had neither seen nor heard from Rochester. But, if the truth must be told, he was never out of her mind, and she found, to her cost, that the heart wil...
-In What Manner The Grocer Victualled His House. Continued
Has my mistress, also, told you of my attachment to your daughter? demanded Leonard, trembling, in spite of his efforts to maintain a show of calmness. Bloundel nodded an affirmative. And of Amab...
-III. The Quack Doctors
Patience, it may be remembered, had promised Blaize to give him her earnings to enable him to procure a fresh supply of medicine, and about a week after he had received the trifling amount (for he had...
-The Quack Doctors. Part 2
Is this the young man who desires to consult me? asked Doctor Calixtus Bottesham, in the cracked and quavering voice of old age, of Parkhurst. It is, replied the apothecary, respectfully. Go for...
-The Quack Doctors. Part 3
And pouring out a bumper, he handed it to the porter, who swallowed it at a draught. And now, said Bottesham, to return to this mad scheme of your master's -- is there no way of preventing it? ...
-IV. The Two Watchmen
On the day following the events last related, as Leonard Holt was standing at the door of the shop, -- his master having just been called out by some important business, -- a man in the dress of a wat...
-The Two Watchmen. Part 2
Oh! when will he cease from persecuting me? she cried. When you cease to encourage him, replied the apprentice, bitterly. I do not encourage him, Leonard, she rejoined, and to prove that I ...
-The Two Watchmen. Part 3
Bless your tender heart! cried Boutefeu, we would not pain you for the world. A truce to this, said Leonard. Come to the yard, we will wait for him there. I will go with you, cried Amabel....
-V. The Blind Piper And His Daughter
Scarcely knowing how he got there, Leonard Holt found himself at the great northern entrance of the cathedral. Burning with fury, he knocked at the door; but no answer being returned to the summons, t...
-The Blind Piper And His Daughter. Part 2
As soon as he concluded, Leonard Holt ran up the steps of the portico, and in a loud voice claimed the attention of the crowd. Solomon Eagle is right, he cried; the vengeance of Heaven will descen...
-The Blind Piper And His Daughter. Part 3
Her father, Mike Macascree, was upwards of sixty, but still in the full vigour of life, with features which, though not ill-looking, bore no particular resemblance to those of his daughter. He had a g...
-VI. Old London From Old Saint Paul's
After repeated, but ineffectual efforts to burst open the door, Leonard gave up the attempt in despair, and endeavoured to make his situation known by loud outcries. But his shouts, if heard, were unh...
-Old London From Old Saint Paul's. Part 2
Filled with wonder at what he saw, Leonard looked towards the east, and here an extraordinary prospect met his gaze. The whole of the city of London was spread out like a map before him, and presented...
-Old London From Old Saint Paul's. Part 3
Wept, did she? cried Leonard, in a voice of much emotion. Then, there is hope for her yet. You appear greatly interested in her, observed Nizza, pausing, in her narration. Do you love her? ...
-VII. Paul's Walk
It will now be necessary to ascertain what took place at the grocer's habitation subsequently to Amabel's abduction. Leonard Holt having departed, Pillichody was preparing to make good his retreat, wh...
-Paul's Walk. Part 2
Hush! cried Pillichody, placing his finger on his lips. I am not going to betray you, returned Patience, in the same tone. But you are sure to be found out, and had better beat a retreat before ...
-Paul's Walk. Part 3
I pledge you my word as a nobleman, interposed Rochester, that your daughter has just descended to Saint Faith's with your apprentice. I can corroborate his lordship's assertion, said Etherege....
-Paul's Walk. Part 4
Decker, moreover, terms Paul's Walk, or the Mediterranean Isle, in his Gull's Hornbook -- the only gallery wherein the pictures of all your true fashionate and complimental gulls are, and ought t...
-VIII. The Amulet
As the grocer disappeared with his daughter, Nizza Macascree, who had anxiously watched the apprentice, observed him turn deadly pale, and stagger; and instantly springing to his side, she supported h...
-The Amulet. Part 2
If you advance another footstep, cried the apprentice, I will fling myself upon you, and the contact may be fatal. Parravicin gazed, furiously at him, and half unsheathed his sword. But the next ...
-The Amulet. Part 3
Eh! exclaimed Chowles, shifting uneasily on his seat. Don't be afraid, returned Judith, laughing at his alarm. I'll take every care of you. We are necessary to each other. So we are, replied...
-IX. How Leonard Was Cured Of The Plague
Nizza Macascree found Judith leaning over her intended victim, and examining the plague-spot on his breast. The nurse was so occupied by her task that she did not hear the door open, and it was not un...
-How Leonard Was Cured Of The Plague. Part 2
She was awakened after awhile by a slight noise near her, and beheld Judith bending over the apprentice, with a pot of ointment in her hand, which she was about to apply to the part affected. The poul...
-How Leonard Was Cured Of The Plague. Part 3
Without allowing her time for reply, he pursued his course, traversing another long, narrow passage. Where are we? asked Nizza, as they arrived at the foot of a spiral stone staircase. Beneath th...
-X. The Pest-House In Finsbury Fields
Not a word passed between the grocer and his daughter, as he took her home from Saint Paul's. Amabel, in fact, was so overpowered by conflicting emotions that she could not speak; while her father, wh...
-The Pest-House In Finsbury Fields. Part 2
On the following day things continued in the same state. The grocer was cold and inscrutable, and his wife, fearing he was meditating some severe course against Amabel, and aware of his inflexible nat...
-The Pest-House In Finsbury Fields. Part 3
The grocer turned away to hide his emotion, and endeavoured through his blinded gaze to discover Leonard, but, as will be anticipated, without success. Stunned by the cries and groans that pierced his...
-XI. How The Grocer Shut Up His House
Placed in a warm bed, and carefully tended by the humane physician, Leonard Holt slept tranquilly for some hours, and when he awoke, though so weak as scarcely to be able to lift an arm, he was free f...
-How The Grocer Shut Up His House. Part 2
And partly by entreaty, partly by compulsion, he made her take a chair; and as soon as she was sufficiently composed to answer him, questioned her as to what she knew relating to Judith Malmayns and C...
-How The Grocer Shut Up His House. Part 3
At length, the opportunity for which the earl had been secretly sighing occurred. Mr. Bloundel called his wife out of the room for a moment, and as their eldest son, Stephen, was in the shop, and the ...
-Book The Third. June, 1665. I. The Imprisoned Family
The first few days of their confinement were passed by the grocer's family in a very uncomfortable manner. No one, except Mr. Bloundel, appeared reconciled to the plan, and even he found it more diffi...
-The Imprisoned Family. Part 2
If things go on in this way, said the porter, London will soon be deserted. No business is conducted, as it used to be, and everybody is viewed with distrust. The preachers, who ought to be the las...
-The Imprisoned Family. Part 3
Leonard reluctantly gave the required pledge. I have unwittingly been the cause of much affliction to you, pursued Amabel -- and would gladly see you happy, and there is one person, I think, who w...
-II. How Fires Were Lighted In The Streets
Nizza Macascree, for it is useless to affect further mystery, as soon as she could find utterance, murmured her thanks to the apprentice, whose satisfaction at her deliverance was greatly diminished b...
-How Fires Were Lighted In The Streets. Part 2
Leonard briefly explained. I deeply regret your imprudence, replied his master; because I can now no more admit you. It is my fixed determination, as you well know, not to suffer any member of my ...
-How Fires Were Lighted In The Streets. Part 3
It is strange, Ned Turgis, observed Gatford, that, though Solomon Eagle may always be seen at daybreak at the top of the tower or on the roof of the cathedral -- sometimes at one point and sometime...
-How Fires Were Lighted In The Streets. Part 4
Murmuring his thanks, Leonard hurried down the spiral staircase, and quitting the cathedral, proceeded in the direction of Wood-street. Preparations were everywhere making for carrying the Lord Mayor'...
-How Fires Were Lighted In The Streets. Part 5
What wrong? rejoined Westwood -- such wrong as can never be repaired. Your fearful prophecies and denunciations so terrified my daughter, that she died distracted. My brokenhearted wife was not lon...
-How Fires Were Lighted In The Streets. Part 6
There is a cord within the hutch by which you can sound a bell within his chamber, returned Leonard; I will ring it. Accordingly, he did so, and the summons was almost instantly answered by the g...
-How Fires Were Lighted In The Streets. Part 7
Accordingly he proceeded to the Globe Tavern at the corner of Birchin-lane. As he entered the house, a lively strain of music caught his ear, and glancing in the direction of the sound, he found it pr...
-III. The Dance Of Death
The condition of the prisons at this season was really frightful. In Newgate, in particular, where the distemper broke out at the beginning of June, it raged with such violence that in less than a wee...
-The Dance Of Death. Part 2
By-and-by, with a wild and gibbering laugh that chilled the beholders' blood, one of the tallest and grisliest of the skeletons sprang forward, and beating his drum, the whole ghostly company formed, ...
-The Dance Of Death. Part 3
At first, Chowles was so confused, that he thought he must have awakened in another world, but by degrees he called to mind what had occurred, and ascertained from Judith that he was in the Convocatio...
-IV. The Plague-Pit
On being made acquainted by Leonard, who helped him out of the pest-cart, with the danger he had run, the piper uttered a cry of terror, and swooned away. The buriers, seeing how matters stood, and th...
-The Plague-Pit. Part 2
Take it, said the piper; and if I die, -- and Nizza should happily be preserved from her ravisher, give it her. But not otherwise -- not otherwise. Implore her to forgive me -- to pity me. Forgi...
-The Plague-Pit. Part 3
I almost begin to fear, said Hodges, unable to repress a shudder, that the poor animal will, indeed, be the means of discovering for us the object of our search. I understand what you mean, rej...
-The Plague-Pit. Part 4
I would rather disclose the secret to her by word of mouth than in any other way, he said. Leonard felt doubtful whether the secret would now be disclosed at all, but he made no remark. Night was ...
-The Plague-Pit. Part 5
Keep off! cried Leonard, brandishing his fork as he spoke; you shall neither commit robbery nor murder here. If you will assist this unfortunate gentleman, I have no doubt you will be well rewarded...
-The Plague-Pit. Part 6
We want a little variety, said one of the group, a good-looking young man, upon whom the wine had evidently made some impression -- we are tired of drinking and play, and may as well listen to a se...
-The Plague-Pit. Part 7
Pshaw! this must never be, said Etherege. Were I to lose her altogether, I should be inconsolable, cried Rochester. As inconsolable as I am for the rich widow of Watling-street, who died a fort...
-V. How Saint Pathos Was Used As A Pest-House
The distemper had by this time increased to such a frightful extent, that the pest-houses being found wholly inadequate to contain the number of sick persons sent to them, it was resolved by the civic...
-How Saint Pathos Was Used As A Pest-House. Part 2
Whether Judith Malmayns had succeeded or not in curing Sir Paul Parravicin, it is not our present purpose to relate. Soon after the cathedral was converted into a lazar-house she returned thither, and...
-How Saint Pathos Was Used As A Pest-House. Part 3
I have been in search of you, he said, and was about to proceed to your residence. Mr. Bloundel wishes to see you immediately. Amabel is worse. I will go with you at once, replied the doctor. ...
-How Saint Pathos Was Used As A Pest-House. Part 4
I cannot bear to part with her, cried Mrs. Bloundel, clasping her arms round her daughter -- I cannot -- I cannot! Restrain yourself, Honora, said her husband; you will do her an injury. Sh...
-How Saint Pathos Was Used As A Pest-House. Part 5
Hodges readily assented. Your father has been discharged as cured from the pest-house, he said, and is lodged at a cottage, kept by my old nurse, Dame Lucas, just without the walls, near Moorgate. ...
-How Saint Pathos Was Used As A Pest-House. Part 6
And he will keep his word, dame, I am sure, replied Leonard. I would recommend you, however, as the best antidote against the plague, to keep yourself constantly employed, and to indulge as few glo...
-How Saint Pathos Was Used As A Pest-House. Part 7
He will be better cared for there than if I were to take charge of him, he observed. As to the money, you can return it if he recovers. If not, it of right belongs to you. Seeing that remonstranc...
-VI. The Departure
It struck four by Saint Paul's as Doctor Hodges, accompanied by Leonard and Nizza Macascree, issued from his dwelling, and proceeded towards Wood-street. The party was followed by a man leading a coup...
-The Departure. Part 2
This is not all, replied Blaize. By my mother's advice, I have eaten twenty leaves of rue, two roasted figs, and two pickled walnuts for breakfast, washing them down with an ale posset, with pimper...
-The Departure. Part 3
I could not let her go thus, cried Mrs. Bloundel. I was listening at my chamber door to hear her depart, and when I caught the sound of her footsteps, I could no longer control myself. So saying, ...
-The Departure. Part 4
Not choosing to incur the risk of passing this contagious load, Leonard retraced his course as far as Holborn Conduit, then turning into Seacole-lane, and making the best of his way to Fleet Bridge, c...
-The Departure. Part 5
I will be with you in a minute, rejoined the watchman. You may possibly procure accommodation at the Wheatsheaf at Paddington, he added to Leonard; it is but a short distance up the road. Thank...
-The Departure. Part 6
Do you mean the Earl of Rochester? cried Leonard. No, no, replied the farmer, whose good-natured countenance had assumed a stern expression. The villain I mean is worse, if possible, than the ea...
-VII. The Journey
Blaize was destined to experience a second fright. It has been mentioned that the infected were sometimes seized with a rabid desire of communicating the disorder to such as had not been attacked by i...
-The Journey. Part 2
I have been thinking that I might offer you a safe asylum here, he said. If you like it, you shall remain with us till your health is fully reinstated. I thank you most kindly for the offer, re...
-The Journey. Part 3
Is it possible your majesty can have been robbed? asked the landlord, who stood cap in hand at the door of the carriage. I'faith, man, it is possible, rejoined the king. We were stopped on Hou...
-VIII. Ashdown Lodge
Erected by Inigo Jones, and still continuing in precisely the same state as at the period of this history, Ashdown Lodge is a large square edifice, built in the formal French taste of the seventeenth ...
-Ashdown Lodge. Part 2
But the satisfaction he derived from having quitted the infected city was trifling compared with that of Blaize, whose sole anxiety was lest he should be sent back to London. Seldom straying further t...
-Ashdown Lodge. Part 3
She passes for such, my liege, replied Etherege, with a smile. But I cannot swear to her parentage. Since I have seen her, I do not wonder at Rochester's extravagant passion, rejoined the monar...
-Ashdown Lodge. Part 4
I shall remain at this place to-night, returned Charles. Take till to-morrow to consider of it, and if you continue in the same mind, your request shall be granted. At least, enjoin the earl to ...
-Ashdown Lodge. Part 5
Zounds and fury! cried Blaize, transported with rage. If I am only a porter, while you pretend to be a major, I will let you see I am the better man of the two. And taking the goose by the neck, h...
-Ashdown Lodge. Part 6
With all my heart, replied Blaize. Immediately after Amabel's departure Charles proceeded with his courtiers to the garden, and continued to saunter up and down the terrace for some time, during wh...
-Ashdown Lodge. Part 7
But your majesty is a far more skilful player than Disbrowe, replied Parravicin, reluctantly. It matters not, rejoined the monarch; the chances will be more equal -- or rather the advantage will...
-IX. Kingston Lisle
About half-past ten, and when it was supposed that the king and his courtiers had retired to rest (for early hours were kept in those days), Mrs. Buscot and Leonard repaired to Amabel's chamber. The g...
-Kingston Lisle. Part 2
I cannot deliver her up, cried Blaize; she sticks to me as fast as a burr. I shall be torn asunder between you. Help! help! Parravicin, having dismounted, now tore away Nizza Macascree, and was j...
-Kingston Lisle. Part 3
At this moment, Amabel caught sight of the benevolent countenance of the good old lady looking up at the window, and a kindly greeting passed between them. Ringwood, who was a privileged intruder, was...
-Book The Fourth. September, 1665. I. The Plague At Its Height
Amabel's departure for Berkshire caused no change in her father's mode of life. Everything proceeded as before within his quiet dwelling; and, except that the family were diminished in number, all app...
-The Plague At Its Height. Part 2
To return to the grocer. While the plague was thus raging around him, and while every house in Wood-street except one or two, from which the inmates had fled, was attacked by the pestilence, he and hi...
-The Plague At Its Height. Part 3
The young man shook his head mournfully. It is a sad tale, he said, and cannot be told now. I can conjecture what it is, replied Solomon Eagle. But come to the small door near the northern ent...
-The Plague At Its Height. Part 4
Answer me, Leonard, cried the grocer, and do not attempt to deceive me. Has she preserved her honour? Up to the time of quitting Oxford she had preserved it, replied the apprentice. She hersel...
-The Plague At Its Height. Part 5
Satisfied with a brief survey of this frightful scene, Leonard turned to depart, and was passing the entrance to Saint Faith's, which stood open, when he caught sight of Judith standing at the foot of...
-II. The Second Plague-Pit
Judith, being a little in advance of her companion, took Leonard in the first instance for a chirurgeon's assistant, and called to him, in a harsh and menacing voice, to let her charge alone. On drawi...
-The Second Plague-Pit. Part 2
I am almost afraid of leaving the poor fellow, said Leonard, hesitating as he was about to descends the steps. Judith Malmayns is so cunning and unscrupulous, that she may find some means of doing ...
-The Second Plague-Pit. Part 3
The dead-cart will pass by in an hour, said the watchman; and then the body can be taken away. An hour will be too late, rejoined Thirlby. If she continues in this frantic state, she will be d...
-The Second Plague-Pit. Part 4
Satisfied with this survey, Leonard opened the gate, but had no sooner set foot in the garden than the loud barking of a dog was heard, and Bell rushed forth. Leonard instantly called to her, and on h...
-The Second Plague-Pit. Part 5
You are looking upon that structure, said the enthusiast, and are thinking how much it is changed. Men who possess boundless riches imagine their power above that of their Maker, and suppose they m...
-The Second Plague-Pit. Part 6
By this time they had reached the pallet in which the porter was laid. His eyes and a small portion of his snub-nose were alone visible, his head being still enveloped by the linen cloth, while his mo...
-III. The House In Nicholas-Lane
On reaching Watling-street, Leonard and his companion found Doctor Hodges was from home. This did not much surprise the apprentice, after the information he had received from Solomon Eagle, but Thirlb...
-The House In Nicholas-Lane. Part 2
It might have done formerly, replied Leonard; but my feelings are as much changed as your own. I have had the plague twice myself. Then, indeed, you can speak, replied Rainbird. Thank God, I...
-The House In Nicholas-Lane. Part 3
On reaching the upper end of Nicholas-lane, Rainbird stood still for a moment, and pointed out a large house on the right, just below the old church dedicated to the saint from which the thoroughfare ...
-The House In Nicholas-Lane. Part 4
Leonard, however, was not to be dissuaded, and they went downstairs. A short flight of stone steps brought them to a spacious kitchen, but it was quite empty, and seemed to have been long disused. The...
-The House In Nicholas-Lane. Part 5
It is needless, said Leonard, your looks answer for you. She is. Yes, yes, I confess she is, replied Chowles. You hear what he says, Sir Paul, remarked Leonard. His fears would make him ...
-The House In Nicholas-Lane. Part 6
He is dumb, said the old woman, but his gestures are easy to be understood. He means that Nizza is worse. Leonard heaved a deep sigh. Passing into a third room, they perceived the poor girl stret...
-The House In Nicholas-Lane. Part 7
Did you not attempt to escape during that time? asked Leonard. I was so carefully watched by Mrs. Carteret and Hassan, that it would have been vain to attempt it, she replied. About a week ago, ...
-The House In Nicholas-Lane. Part 8
I might well refuse you, replied Thirlby, sternly, but it is necessary we should have some explanation of what has occurred. It is, rejoined Parravicin, and, therefore, I have sought you. Thi...
-IV. The Trials Of Amabel
It will now be necessary to return to the period of Amabel's abduction from Kingston Lisle. The shawl thrown over her head prevented her cries from being heard; and, notwithstanding her struggles, she...
-The Trials Of Amabel. Part 2
The Plough, for so the inn was denominated, was thrown into the utmost confusion by the arrival of the earl and his suite. All the ordinary frequenters of the inn were ejected, while the best parlour ...
-The Trials Of Amabel. Part 3
I came for your answer, Amabel, he said; but I scarcely require it, being convinced from your looks that I have nothing to fear. Oh! why did you not abridge this tedious interval? Why not inform me...
-V. The Marriage And Its Consequences
Unwilling to believe he had become an object of aversion to Amabel, Rochester renewed his solicitations on the following day, and calling into play his utmost fascination of manner, endeavoured to rem...
-The Marriage And Its Consequences. Part 2
Alas! madam, replied the attendant, the earl has been taken suddenly ill. He set out for Wood-street the first thing this morning, and has seen your father, who refuses to receive you. On his retur...
-The Marriage And Its Consequences. Part 3
Amabel, however, suffered no further misgiving to take possession of her. Deeming herself wedded to the earl, she put no constraint on her affection for him, and her happiness, though short-lived, was...
-VI. The Certificate
Wretch! cried the earl. An instinctive dread that you would do your poor charge some injury brought me back, and I thank Heaven I have arrived in time to prevent your atrocious purpose. Your lor...
-The Certificate. Part 2
Pshaw! cried the earl, she acted by my directions. Take the chest away, he added to Judith. Has your lordship no further orders? she rejoined, significantly. None whatever, he replied, with ...
-The Certificate. Part 3
But the return of reason brought with it no solace. On the contrary, the earl's treachery rushed upon her recollection, and gave her infinitely more anguish than the bodily pain she had recently endur...
-The Certificate. Part 4
At last, one of the chirurgeon's assistants told him that he thought the doctor was gone towards Cornhill, and hoping, accidentally, to meet with him, the enthusiast set off in that direction. While p...
-Book The Fifth. December, 1665. I. The Decline Of The Plague
More than two months must be passed over in silence. During that time, the pestilence had so greatly abated as no longer to occasion alarm to those who had escaped its ravages. It has been mentioned t...
-The Decline Of The Plague. Part 2
During all this time the grocer had not opened his dwelling. The wisdom of this plan was now made fully apparent. The plague was declining fast, and not an inmate of his house had been attacked by it....
-The Decline Of The Plague. Part 3
I have been most imprudent, he said, in thus exposing myself to infection. I have symptoms of the plague about me, and will instantly repair to one of the upper rooms which I have laid aside as an ...
-The Decline Of The Plague. Part 4
His is true love, indeed, doctor, sighed Mrs. Bloundel. Pity it is that it could not be requited. I know not how it is, rejoined Hodges, and will not question the decrees of our All-Wise Ruler...
-The Decline Of The Plague. Part 5
You! cried Patience, contemptuously; I would not have you for the world. Where is he buried? In the plague-pit, replied Pillichody. I attended him during his illness. It was his second attack ...
-II. The Midnight Meeting
The first day of his deliverance being spent by the grocer in the praiseworthy manner before related, he laid his head upon his pillow with a feeling of satisfaction such as he had not for months expe...
-The Midnight Meeting. Part 2
I must decline to hear them, my lord, replied the grocer, coldly; nor shall you ever cross my threshold again with my consent. My poor child is now at peace. You can do her no further injury, and m...
-The Midnight Meeting. Part 3
Utter a cry, and it is your last, cried a stern voice. Where is he? Who -- who? demanded Blaize, half dead with terror. He whom you appointed to meet, replied the unknown. I appointed to m...
-Book The Sixth. September, 1666. I. The Fire-Hall
About nine o'clock on the night of Saturday, the second of September, 1666 -- and rather more than nine months after the incidents last related, -- three men took their way from Smithfield to Islingto...
-The Fire-Hall. Part 2
Did you not see that sign? cried Grant, eagerly. It heralds us to our task. So saying, he ran swiftly down the hill, and, followed by the others, did not slacken his pace till they reached the ci...
-The Fire-Hall. Part 3
Would you had killed him! cried the other, fiercely. I have lost all feelings of a father for him. He it was who contrived my arrest, and he would have gladly seen me borne to the scaffold, certain...
-II. The First Night Of The Fire
Having seen the stack of wood kindled, and the flames attack the building in such a manner as to leave no doubt they would destroy it, the incendiaries separated, previously agreeing to meet together ...
-The First Night Of The Fire. Part 2
In this way a number of persons were inclosed for a short time between two fires, and seemed in imminent danger of being burned to death. The perilous nature of their situation was, moreover, increase...
-The First Night Of The Fire. Part 3
Great efforts were now made to check the fire. A few of the cumbrous and unmanageable engines of the day were brought to the spot, but no water could be obtained. All the aqueducts, pipes, and sluices...
-III. Progress Of The Fire
Instantly surrounded and seized by the mob, Grant offered no resistance, but demanded to be led with his accuser before a magistrate. Almost as the words were uttered, a cry was raised that the lord m...
-Progress Of The Fire. Part 2
We must go further off, if we would do any good, said Leonard; and as the present plan is evidently too slow, we must have recourse to gunpowder. Gunpowder! exclaimed the lord mayor. Would you...
-Progress Of The Fire. Part 3
Finding he could neither render any assistance, nor obtain speech with the lord mayor, and anxious to behold the terrible yet sublime spectacle from the river, Leonard hastened to Old Swan-Stairs, and...
-IV. Leonard's Interview With The King
Some rumours of the conflagration, as will be supposed, had ere this reached Mr. Bloundel, but he had no idea of the extent of the direful calamity, and when informed of it by Leonard, lifted up his h...
-Leonard's Interview With The King. Part 2
And so am I, replied Blaize. Mr. Bloundel is a great deal too particular. What a dreadful thing it would be if the house should be burnt down, and all my mother's savings, which were to form a prov...
-Leonard's Interview With The King. Part 3
Who have you with you, Rochester? demanded Charles, as the earl and his companion approached him. A young man, my liege, who desires to make known to you a plan for checking this conflagration, r...
-V. How Leonard Saved The King's Life
The royal barge landed at Queenhithe, and Charles instantly disembarking, proceeded on foot, and at a pace that compelled, his attendants to move quickly, to keep up with him, to Thames-street. Here, ...
-How Leonard Saved The King's Life. Part 2
Your majesty's directions shall be implicitly obeyed, replied the lord mayor. You will then pull down all the houses to the east of the fire, pursued the king. Get all the men you can muster; an...
-How Leonard Saved The King's Life. Part 3
As Leonard had foreseen, the civic authorities were adverse to the plan. The lord mayor in the name of himself and his brethren, earnestly solicited the king to postpone the execution of his order til...
-VI. How The Grocer's House Was Burnt
It was full ten o'clock before Leonard could obtain permission to quit the king's party, and he immediately hurried to Wood-street. He had scarcely entered it, when the cry of fire smote his ears, a...
-How The Grocer's House Was Burnt. Part 2
They encountered no further difficulties, but were necessarily compelled to proceed at a slow pace, and did not reach Paddington for nearly two hours, being frequently stopped by persons eagerly askin...
-How The Grocer's House Was Burnt. Part 3
Leaving Leonard and his companions to the contemplation of this tremendous spectacle, we shall proceed to take a nearer view of its ravages. Every effort had been used to preserve the Royal Exchange b...
-VII. The Burning Of Saint Paul's
Several other persons having by this time come up, the body of Lord Argentine was conveyed to Bishop Kempe's Chapel, and left there till a fitting season should arrive for its removal. Confounded by t...
-The Burning Of Saint Paul's. Part 2
So, my masters, observed the turnkey, with a grim smile, you were not able to rescue them, I perceive? But receiving no answer, he added, Well, and what did you see? A sight that would have mo...
-The Burning Of Saint Paul's. Part 3
While they were in this state, the flames, which had long been burning in secret, burst through the roof at the other end of the choir, and instantaneously spread over its whole expanse. At this junct...
-VIII. How Leonard Rescued The Lady Isabella
The course of events having been somewhat anticipated in the last chapter, it will now be necessary to return to an earlier stage in the destruction of the cathedral, namely, soon after the furious bu...
-How Leonard Rescued The Lady Isabella. Continued
Your majesty overwhelms me, replied Leonard, falling on his knee and pressing the king's hand, which was kindly extended towards him, to his lips. I can scarcely persuade myself I am not in a dream...
-IX. What Befel Chowles And Judith In The Vaults Of Saint Faith's
Having now seen what occurred outside Saint Paul's, we shall proceed to the vaults beneath it. Chowles and Judith, it has been mentioned, were descried by Leonard, just before the outbreak of the fire...
-X. Conclusion
Lord Argentine proceeded, as directed by the king, to the eastern end of Tower-street, where he found Lord Craven, and having delivered him the king's missive, and shown him the signet, they proceeded...









TOP
previous page: Sense And Sensibility | by Jane Austen
  
page up: Novels
  
next page: Windsor Castle | by William Harrison Ainsworth