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Robbery Under Arms; A Story Of Life And Adventure In The Bush And In The Australian Goldfields | by Rolf Boldrewood



I dedicate this "ower true tale" of the wilder aspects of Australian life to my old comrade R. Murray Smith, late Agent-General in London for the colony of Victoria, with hearty thanks for the time and trouble he has devoted to its publication. I trust it will do no discredit to the rising reputation of Australian romance. But though presented in the guise of fiction, this chronicle of the Marston family must not be set down by the reader as wholly fanciful or exaggerated. Much of the narrative is literally true, as can be verified by official records. A lifelong residence in Australia may be accepted as a guarantee for fidelity as to local colour and descriptive detail. I take this opportunity of acknowledging the prompt and liberal recognition of the tale by the proprietors of the 'Sydney Mail', but for which it might never have seen the light.

TitleRobbery Under Arms; A Story Of Life And Adventure In The Bush And In The Australian Goldfields
AuthorRolf Boldrewood
PublisherBernhard Tauchnitz
Year1889
Copyright1889, Rolf Boldrewood
AmazonRobbery under Arms; a story of life and adventure in the bush and in the Australian goldfields

By Rolf Boldrewood

Author of "The Miner's Right", "The Squatter's Dream", "A Colonial Reformer", etc.

-Chapter 1
My name's Dick Marston, Sydney-side native. I'm twenty-nine years old, six feet in my stocking soles, and thirteen stone weight. Pretty strong and active with it, so they say. I don't want to blow ...
-Chapter 1. Part 2
He does drink, of course; every miserable man, and a good many women as have something to fear or repent of, drink. The worst of it is that too much of it brings on the 'horrors', and then the devil,...
-Chapter 1. Part 3
Well, our farm was on a good little flat, with a big mountain in front, and a scrubby, rangy country at the back for miles. People often asked him why he chose such a place. 'It suits me,' he used t...
-Chapter 2
Father was one of those people that gets shut of a deal of trouble in this world by always sticking to one thing. If he said he'd do this or that he always did it and nothing else. As for turning hi...
-Chapter 2. Continued
All the same, poor old Mr. Howard wasn't always on the booze, not by any manner of means. He never touched a drop of anything, not even ginger-beer, while he was straight, and he kept us all going fr...
-Chapter 3
So the years went on -- slow enough they seemed to us sometimes -- the green winters, pretty cold, I tell you, with frost and hail-storms, and the long hot summers. We were not called boys any longer...
-Chapter 3. Part 2
'You and I might have been better friends lately,' says he; 'but don't you forget you've got another brother besides Jim -- one that will stick to you, too, fair weather or foul.' I always had a grea...
-Chapter 3. Part 3
'Who brought it?' I said. 'One of the Dalys -- Patsey, I think.' 'All right,' said Jim, kissing her as he lifted her up in his great strong arms. 'I must go in and have a gossip with the old woman....
-Chapter 3. Part 4
I remember the whole lot of bad-meaning thoughts coming with a rush over my heart, and I laughed at myself for being so soft as to choose a hard-working, pokey kind of life at the word of a slow fello...
-Chapter 4
'All right,' said I, 'he must have got there a day before his time. It is a big mob and no mistake. I wonder where they're taking them to.' Aileen shrugged her shoulders and walked in to mother with...
-Chapter 4. Continued
'Why, here comes old Crib. Who'd have thought he'd have seen the track? Well done, old man. Now we're right.' Father never took any notice of the poor brute as he came limping along the stones. W...
-Chapter 5
'Now then, you boys!' says father, coming up all of a sudden like, and bringing out his words as if it was old times with us, when we didn't know whether he'd hit first and talk afterwards, or the oth...
-Chapter 5. Part 2
It was child's play now, as far as the driving went. Jim and I walked along, leading our horses and yarning away as we used to do when we were little chaps bringing in the milkers. 'My word, Dick, d...
-Chapter 5. Part 3
I could cry like a child when I think of it now. I have cried many's the time and often since I have been shut up here, and dashed my head against the stones till I pretty nigh knocked all sense and ...
-Chapter 6
After we'd fairly settled to stay, father began to be more pleasant than he'd ever been before. We were pretty likely, he said, to have a visit from Starlight and the half-caste in a day or two, if w...
-Chapter 6. Part 2
Then we saw he had been wounded. There was blood on his shirt, and the upper part of his arm was bandaged. 'It's too late, father,' said I; 'he's a dead man. What pluck he must have had to ride dow...
-Chapter 6. Part 3
Where he'd come from, of course, we were not to know then. He had a small private sort of brand that didn't belong to any of the big studs; but he was never bred by a poor man. I afterwards found ou...
-Chapter 7
It was pretty late that night when we got home, and poor mother and Aileen were that glad to see us that they didn't ask too many questions. Mother would sit and look at the pair of us for ever so lo...
-Chapter 7. Continued
When we came in at night old mother used to look that pleased and happy we couldn't help feeling better in our hearts. Aileen used to read something out of the paper that she thought might amuse us. ...
-Chapter 8
The 'big squatter', as he was called on our side of the country, was Mr. Falkland. He was an Englishman that had come young to the colony, and worked his way up by degrees. He had had no money when ...
-Chapter 9
Well, away we went to this township. Bundah was the name of it; not that there was anything to do or see when we got there. It was the regular up-country village, with a public-house, a store, a pou...
-Chapter 9. Continued
'Hold up your hand,' she said. 'Now, papa, lend me yours.' With the last she cleared the wound of the flowing blood, and then neatly and skilfully bound up the wrist firmly with the strips of cambri...
-Chapter 10
Now Jim and I had had many a long talk together about what we should do in case we wanted to signal to each other very pressing. We thought the time might come some day when we might be near enough t...
-Chapter 10. Continued
'Miss Falkland didn't faint, though she turned white and then red, and trembled like a leaf when I lifted her down, and looked up at me with a sweet smile, and said -- 'Jim, you have paid me for bin...
-Chapter 11
Warrigal left his horse at the edge of the timber, for fear he might want him in a hurry, I suppose. He was pretty 'fly', and never threw away a chance as long as he was sober. He could drink a bit,...
-Chapter 11. Part 2
'If you leave it to me,' says Jim, 'I say, don't go. It's only some other cross cattle or horse racket. We're bound to be nobbled some day. Why not cut it now, and stick to the square thing? We co...
-Chapter 11. Part 3
As we rode up we could see a gunyah made out of boughs, and a longish wing of dogleg fence, made light but well put together. As soon as we got near enough a dog ran out and looked as if he was going...
-Chapter 11. Part 4
'I believe you,' I said, thinking of our ride yesterday. 'It's quite bad enough to follow him on level ground. But don't you think our tracks will be easy to follow with a thousand head of cattle be...
-Chapter 12
We didn't go straight ahead along any main track to the Lower Murray and Adelaide exactly. That would have been a little too open and barefaced. No; we divided the mob into three, and settled where ...
-Chapter 12. Part 2
The other chaps were wild for a spree. Jim and I had made up our minds to be careful; still, we had a lot to see in a big town like Adelaide; for we'd never been to Sydney even in our lives, and we'd...
-Chapter 12. Part 3
All of us went back to our camp. Our work was over, but we had to settle up among ourselves and divide shares. I could hardly believe my eyes when I saw the cattle all sold and gone, and nothing lef...
-Chapter 13
We got to Melbourne all right, and though it's a different sort of a place from Sydney, it's a jolly enough town for a couple of young chaps with money in their pockets. Most towns are, for the matte...
-Chapter 13. Part 2
Going away was easy enough, in a manner of speaking; but we'd been a month in Melbourne, and when you mind that we were not bad-looking chaps, fairishly dressed, and with our pockets full of money, it...
-Chapter 13. Part 3
I didn't find out all about her nature at once -- trust a woman for that. Vain and fond of pleasure I could see she was; and from having been always poor, in a worrying, miserable, ill-contented way,...
-Chapter 14
One blazing hot day in the Christmas week Jim and I rode up the 'gap' that led from the Southern road towards Rocky Creek and the little flat near the water where our hut stood. The horses were tired...
-Chapter 14. Part 2
I thought, too, how we might have been ten times, twenty times, as happy if we'd only kept on steady ding-dong work, like George Storefield, having patience and seeing ourselves get better off -- even...
-Chapter 14. Part 3
'Anyhow, we'd made it up to come home at Christmas,' says Jim; 'but it's all one. It would have saved us a deal of trouble in our minds all the same if we'd known there was no warrants out after us t...
-Chapter 15
George Storefield's place, for the old man was dead and all the place belonged to him and Gracey, quite stunned Jim and me. We'd been away more than a year, and he'd pulled down the old fences and pu...
-Chapter 16
When we got home it was pretty late, and the air was beginning to cool after the hot day. There was a low moon, and everything showed out clear, so that you could see the smallest branches of the tre...
-Chapter 16. Part 2
'It's come just as I said, and knowed it would, through Starlight's cussed flashness and carryin's on in fine company. If he'd cleared out and made for the Islands as I warned him to do, and he settl...
-Chapter 16. Part 3
When we mention the name of the notorious 'Starlight', no one will be surprised that the deed was planned, carried out, and executed with consummate address and completeness. It seems matter of regre...
-Chapter 17
I wasn't in the humour for talking, but sometimes anything's better than one's own thoughts. Goring threw in a word from time to time. He'd only lately come into our district, and was sure to be prom...
-Chapter 17. Part 2
They searched Nulla Mountain from top to bottom; but some of the smartest men of the old Mounted Police and the best of the stockmen in the old days -- men not easy to beat -- had tried the same count...
-Chapter 17. Part 3
Where, in the devil's name, is that Warrigal? I thought to myself. Has he given them the slip? He had, as it turned out. He had slipped the handcuffs over his slight wrists and small hands, bided h...
-Chapter 17. Part 4
We had one bit of luck in having to be tried in an out-of-the-way place like Nomah. It was a regular outside bush township, and though the distance oughtn't to have much to say to people's honesty, y...
-Chapter 18
Mr. Runnimall, the auctioneer, swore that the older prisoner placed certain cattle in his hands, to arrive, for sale in the usual way, stating that his name was Mr. Charles Carisforth, and that he had...
-Chapter 18. Part 2
The witnessing part was all over. It took the best part of the day, and there we were all the time standing up in the dock, with the court crammed with people staring at us. I don't say that it felt...
-Chapter 18. Part 3
He did not wish to reflect upon this or any other jury, but he could not help recalling the fact that a jury in that town once committed the unpardonable fault, the crime, he had almost said, of refus...
-Chapter 19
It took us a week's travelling or more to get to Berrima. Sometimes we were all night in the coach as well as all day. There were other passengers in the coach with us. Two or three bushmen, a stati...
-Chapter 19. Part 2
'He and his brother worked for my father at Boree,' she said, quite stately. 'His brother saved my life.' I was called back by the warder. Miss Falkland stepped out before them all, and shook hands...
-Chapter 19. Part 3
We knew from the other prisoners that men had tried from time to time to get away. Three had been caught. One had been shot dead -- he was lucky -- another had fallen off the wall and broke his leg....
-Chapter 20
What a different feel from prison air the fresh night breeze had as we swept along a lonely outside track! The stars were out, though the sky was cloudy now and then, and the big forest trees looked ...
-Chapter 20. Part 2
Our horses were put in the stable and well looked to, you may be sure. The man that straps a cross cove's horse don't go short of his half-crown -- two or three of them, maybe. We made a first-rate ...
-Chapter 20. Part 3
'How do you mean?' says she, quite excited like. 'Why, if I drop one of these fine days -- and it's on the cards any time -- you shall have Rainbow; but, mind now, you're to promise me' -- here he lo...
-Chapter 21
Daylight broke when we were close up to the Black Range, safe enough, a little off the line but nothing to signify. Then we hit off the track that led over the Gap and down into a little flat on a cr...
-Chapter 21. Part 2
'And where are you going when you leave this place?' she asked. 'Surely you and my brothers never can live in New South Wales after all that has passed.' 'We must try, at all events, Miss Marston,' S...
-Chapter 21. Part 3
'But why don't you take your own advice?' said Aileen, looking over at Starlight as he sat there quite careless and comfortable-looking, as if he'd no call to trouble his head about anything. 'Isn't ...
-Chapter 21. Part 4
'So it seems,' says Starlight; 'here's a sovereign for you, youngster. Keep your ears and eyes open; you'll always find that good information brings a good price. I'd advise you to keep away from Mr...
-Chapter 22
I brought it out sudden-like to Aileen before I could stop myself, but it was all true. How we were to make the first start we couldn't agree; but we were bound to make another big touch, and this ti...
-Chapter 22. Part 2
I woke first; Jim was fast asleep, but dad had been up a goodish while and got things ready for breakfast. It was a fine, clear morning; everything looked beautiful, 'specially to me that had been lo...
-Chapter 22. Part 3
Not a pleasant letter, by no manner of means. I was glad I didn't get it while I was eating my heart out under the stifling low roof of the cell at Nomah, or when I was bearing my load at Berrima. A...
-Chapter 23
'Because it's too late,' growled father; 'too late by years. It's sink or swim with all of us. If we work together we may make ten thousand pounds or more in the next four or five years, enough to c...
-Chapter 23. Part 2
The big houses in the bush, too. Nothing's easier than to stick up one of them -- lots of valuable things, besides money, often kept there, and it's ten to one against any one being on the look-out w...
-Chapter 23. Part 3
But I don't know whatever we should have done, that month we stayed there, at the first -- we were never so long idle again -- without the horses. We used to muster them twice a week, run 'em up into...
-Chapter 23. Part 4
WONDERFUL DISCOVERY OF GOLD AT THE TURON. We have much pleasure in informing our numerous constituents that gold, similar in character and value to that of San Francisco, has been discovered on the ...
-Chapter 24
Our first try-on in the coach line was with the Goulburn mail. We knew the road pretty well, and picked out a place where they had to go slow and couldn't get off the road on either side. There's al...
-Chapter 24. Part 2
You never saw a man in such a funk. He was a storekeeper, we found afterwards. He nearly dropped on his knees. Then he handed Starlight a bundle of notes, a gold watch, and took a handsome diamond ...
-Chapter 24. Part 3
'Capital idea,' says Starlight; 'I was wondering how we'd get those colts off. You've the best head amongst us, governor. We'll start out to-day and muster the horses, and we can take Warrigal with ...
-Chapter 24. Part 4
'All right,' says Jim. 'I'll give you and Bell a pair each, if you're good girls, when we sell the horses, unless we're nailed at the Turon. What sort of a shop is it? Are they getting much gold?' ...
-Chapter 24. Part 5
'I'll give him a hammerin' for that yet,' grumbles old Jim. 'My word, he was that shaky and blue-lookin' he didn't know whether I was white or black.' We had a great spree that night in a quiet way,...
-Chapter 24. Part 6
It was rather sharp work getting the colts through men, women, and children, carts, cradles, shafts, and tin dishes; but they were a trifle tired and tender-footed, so in less than twenty minutes they...
-Chapter 24. Part 7
There was a big crowd gathered round outside. They began to groan when the trooper lit the straw, but they did nothing, and went quietly home after a bit. We had the horses to see after next day. J...
-Chapter 25
Our next chance came through father. He was the intelligence man, and had all the news sent to him -- roundabout it might be, but it always came, and was generally true; and the old man never trouble...
-Chapter 25. Continued
We lost no time then, and Starlight rode up to the bank first. It was about ten minutes to three o'clock. Jim and I popped our horses into the police stables, and put on a couple of their waterproof...
-Chapter 26
After the Ballabri affair we had to keep close for weeks and weeks. The whole place seemed to be alive with police. We heard of them being on Nulla Mountain and close enough to the Hollow now and the...
-Chapter 26. Part 2
When we got to Barnes's place he and the old woman seemed ever so glad to see us. Bella and Maddie rushed out, making a great row, and chattering both at a time. 'Why, we thought you were lost, or s...
-Chapter 26. Part 3
Except the Hollow it was the safest place in the whole country just now, as we could hear that every week fresh people were pouring in from all the other colonies, and every part of the world. The po...
-Chapter 27
This meeting with Kate Morrison put the stuns upon me and Jim, and no mistake. We never expected to see her up at the Turon, and it all depended which way the fit took her now whether it would be a f...
-Chapter 27. Part 2
When the waiter was opening their wine one of the camp officers comes in that they had letters to. So they asked him to join them, and Starlight sends for another bottle of Moselle -- something like ...
-Chapter 27. Part 3
Even when we went into Bargo, or some of the other country towns, they did not seem so much brighter. Sleepy-looking, steady-going places they all were, with people crawling about them like a lot of ...
-Chapter 28
As everything looked so fair-weather-like, Jim and Jeanie made it up to be married as soon after she came up as he could get a house ready. She came up to Sydney, first by sea and after that to the d...
-Chapter 28. Part 2
So George was hail-fellow-well-met with all the swells at the camp, and the bankers and big storekeepers, and the doctors and lawyers and clergymen, all the nobs there were at the Turon; and when the ...
-Chapter 28. Part 3
Jim certainly was a big upstanding chap, strong built but active with it, and as fine a figure of a man as you'd see on the Turon or any other place. He stood about six feet and an inch, and was as s...
-Chapter 29
Jim and his wife moved over to the cottage in Specimen Gully; the miners went back to their work, and there was no more talk or bother about the matter. Something always happened every day at the Tur...
-Chapter 29. Part 2
We had as little notion of trying anything of the sort ourselves than as we had of breaking into the Treasury in Sydney by night. But those who knew used to say that if the miners had known the past ...
-Chapter 29. Part 3
I wasn't married like Jim, and it not being very lively in the tent at night, Arizona Bill and I mostly used to stroll up to the Prospectors' Arms. We'd got used to sitting at the little table, drink...
-Chapter 30
We made up our minds to start by Saturday's coach. It left at night and travelled nigh a hundred miles by the same hour next morning. It's more convenient for getting away than the morning. A chap ...
-Chapter 30. Part 2
'Are you telling me the truth, Richard Marston?' says she, standing up and fixing her eyes full on me -- fine eyes they were, too, in their way; 'or are you trying another deceit, to throw me off the ...
-Chapter 30. Part 3
Then all kinds of thoughts came into my head. Would Kate, when her burst of rage was over, go in for revenge in cold blood? She could hardly strike me without at the same time hurting Jeanie through...
-Chapter 30. Part 4
'Tell Bill I want him, Joe,' I said. 'Can't leave guard nohow,' says the true grit old hunter, pointing to his revolver, and dodging up and down with his lame leg, a crooked arm, and a seam in his fa...
-Chapter 31
I got to Bates's paddocks about daylight, and went straight up to the hut where the man lived that looked after it. Most of the diggers that cared about their horses paid for their grass in farmers' ...
-Chapter 31. Part 2
'Not they. They split and took across towards the Mountain Hut, where you all camped with the horses. I didn't see 'em; but I cut their tracks. Five shod horses. They might be here tomorrow.' A b...
-Chapter 31. Part 3
Jim propped up the poor chap, whose life-blood was flowing red through the bullet-hole, and made him as comfortable as he could. 'I must take your horse, mate,' he says; 'but you know it's only the f...
-Chapter 32
I'd settled in my mind that it couldn't be any one else, when he sat up, yawned, and looked round as if he had not been away from the old place a week. 'Ha! Richard, here we are again! Feeds the bo...
-Chapter 32. Part 2
'Mine came from a jealous woman, says Sir Ferdinand. They may generally be depended upon for a straight tip. But we're losing time. When did he leave the claim, and which way did he go? 'I hav...
-Chapter 32. Part 3
That might happen at any time on one of the spurs of Nulla Mountain; and the finding out of the track down to the Hollow by some one of the dozens of rambling, shooting, fishing diggers would be as ce...
-Chapter 33
A month's loafing in the Hollow. Nothing doing and nothing to think of except what was miserable enough, God knows. Then things began to shape themselves, in a manner of speaking. We didn't talk mu...
-Chapter 33. Continued
'Well, Dick,' says this young limb of Satan, 'so you've took to the Queen's highway agin, as the chap says in the play. I thought you and Jim was a-going to jine the Methodies or the Sons of Temperan...
-Chapter 34
We were desperate fidgety and anxious till the day came. While we were getting ready two or three things went wrong, of course. Jim got a letter from Jeanie, all the way from Melbourne, where she'd ...
-Chapter 34. Continued
Starlight just spoke a word to them all; he didn't talk much, but looked hard and stern about the face, as a captain ought to do. He rode up to the gap and saw where the trees had been cut down to bl...
-Chapter 35
'We done that job to rights if we never done another, eh, lad?' says father, reaching out for a coal to put in his pipe. 'Seems like it,' I said. 'There'll be a deuce of a bobbery about it. We shan...
-Chapter 35. Continued
'Well, I'll bet you a new meerschaum that both men are arrested on suspicion before shearing. Of course they'll let them go again; but, you mark my words, they'll be stopped, as well as dozens of oth...
-Chapter 36
When we found that by making darts and playing hide and seek with the police in this way we could ride about the country more comfortable like, we took matters easier. Once or twice we tried it on by...
-Chapter 36. Part 2
'Come, Miss Polly,' says he, 'you can sing away fast enough for your dashed old father and some o' them swells from Bathurst. By George, you must tune your pipe a bit this time for Dan Moran.' The p...
-Chapter 36. Part 3
Old Jim stood up by the fireplace after that, never stirring nor speaking, with his eyes fixed on Miss Falkland, who had got back her colour, and though she panted a bit and looked raised like, she wa...
-Chapter 37
This bit of a barney, of course, made bad blood betwixt us and Moran's mob, so for a spell Starlight and father thought it handier for us to go our own road and let them go theirs. We never could agr...
-Chapter 37. Continued
They didn't know the man they were after, or they'd have just as soon have gone to 'take tea', as they called it, with a tiger. Father put on one of his old poacher dodges that he had borrowed from t...
-Chapter 38
We all pulled up at the side of the gully or dry creek, whatever it was, and jumped off our horses, leaving Warrigal to look after them, and ran down the rocky sides of it. 'Great God!' Starlight cri...
-Chapter 38. Part 2
Dad was hit right through the top of the left shoulder. The ball had gone through the muscle and lodged somewhere. We couldn't see anything of it. Another bullet had gone right through him, as far ...
-Chapter 38. Part 3
Whatever thoughts was in her mind, she roused up the old pony, and came towards us quick as soon as she catches sight of us. In two seconds Jim had lifted her down in his strong arms, and was holding...
-Chapter 39
Towards morning father went into a heavy sleep; he didn't wake till the afternoon. Poor Aileen was able to get a doze and change her dress. After breakfast, while we were having a bit of a chat, in ...
-Chapter 39. Part 2
It was a beautiful warm evening, though summer was over, and we were getting into the cold nights and sharp mornings again, just before the regular winter weather. There was going to be a change, and...
-Chapter 39. Part 3
So Aileen used to make Rainbow walk and amble his best, so that all the rest of us, when she did it for fun, had to jog. Then she'd jump him over logs or the little trickling deep creeks that ran dow...
-Chapter 39. Part 4
Starlight had plenty of money, besides his share of the gold. If we could ever get away from this confounded rock-walled prison, good as it was in some ways; and if he and Aileen and the rest of us c...
-Chapter 40
At last father got well, and said he didn't see what good Aileen could do stopping any longer in the Hollow, unless she meant to follow up bush-ranging for a living. She'd better go back and stay alo...
-Chapter 40. Part 2
'Aileen, dear,' I said, 'you are old enough to know what's best for yourself. I didn't think Starlight was on for marrying any woman, but he's far and away the best man we've ever known, so you can p...
-Chapter 40. Part 3
'Why, Hagan's business, of course,' says Maddie; 'four men killed in cold blood. Only I know you couldn't and wouldn't be in it I'd not know any of ye from a crow. There now.' 'Quite right, most be...
-Chapter 41
We hadn't been long at home, just enough to get tired of doing nothing, when we got a letter from Bella Barnes, telling us that she was going to get married the day after the Turon races, and remindin...
-Chapter 41. Part 2
When we'd regular chalked it out about entering Rainbow for the Grand Turon Handicap, we sent Warrigal over to Billy the Boy, and got him to look up old Jacob. He agreed to take the old horse, the we...
-Chapter 41. Part 3
About eleven o'clock every one went out to the course. It wasn't more than a mile from town. The first race wasn't to be run till twelve; but long before that time the road was covered with horsemen...
-Chapter 41. Part 4
Well, the day went over at last, and all of them that liked a little fun and dancing better than heavy drinking made it up to go to the race ball. It was a subscription affair -- guinea tickets, just...
-Chapter 42
A good many gentlemen and ladies that lived in the town and in the diggings, or near it, had come before this and had been dancing away and enjoying themselves, though the room was pretty full of digg...
-Chapter 42. Part 2
'Good gad!' says Starlight, 'you don't say so! Poor girl! What a most extraordinary country! You meet with surpwises every day, don't you?' 'It's a pity Sir Ferdinand isn't here,' said the Commiss...
-Chapter 42. Part 3
'Well, good-bye, old man,' says I, 'and good luck. One of us will come and lead you into the weighing yard, if you pull it off, and chance the odds, if Sir Ferdinand himself was at the gate.' 'All r...
-Chapter 42. Part 4
When they got into the carriage and drove off the whole church was cleared, and they got such a cheer as you might have heard at Tambaroora. The parson was the only living soul left near the building...
-Chapter 43
Mr. Dawson drove pretty near the stand then, and they all stood up in the drag. I went back to Aileen and Gracey Storefield. We were close by the winning post when they came past; they had to go ano...
-Chapter 43. Part 2
'That's impossible,' says the Commissioner. 'There's been no one here that the police are acquainted with; not that I suppose Jackson and Murphy know many of the cross boys.' 'No strange men nor hor...
-Chapter 43. Part 3
Dad was glad enough to see us; he was almost civil, and when he heard that Rainbow had won the 'big money' he laughed till I thought he'd do himself mischief, not being used to it. He made us tell hi...
-Chapter 44
'The Banner comes next,' says Starlight, tearing it open. 'We shall have something short and sweet after the Star. How's this? STARLIGHT AGAIN. This mercurial brigand, it would appear, has pa...
-Chapter 44. Part 2
Just about ten o'clock we closed in on the place, and left Billy the Boy and Warrigal with the horses, while we sneaked up. We couldn't get near, though, without his knowing it, for he always had a l...
-Chapter 44. Part 3
It was an old-fashioned house for that part of the world, built a good many years ago by a rich settler, who was once the owner of all that side of the country. The staircase was all stone, ornamente...
-Chapter 45
So Mr. Knightley stood up and faced them all like a man. He was one of those chaps that makes up their mind pretty quick about the sort of people they've got to deal with, and if there's anything to ...
-Chapter 45. Part 2
'That won't make it any better for you, mate,' says Moran, with a grin. 'When you and he's lying under that old tree outside, it'll make no odds to yer whether our rope's a long or a short 'un.' 'Qu...
-Chapter 45. Part 3
'Perfectly, my dear fellow,' says Mr. Knightley. 'Don't mention it. I shall always feel personally indebted to you for far more than I can express. But let that pass for the present. What shall we...
-Chapter 46
We ate well and drank better still at the lunch, although we had such a regular tuck-out at breakfast time. Mr. Knightley wouldn't hear of any of us shirking our liquor, and by the time we'd done all...
-Chapter 46. Continued
At long last they'd got to the end of the conning, and divided the notes. Moran tied his up in a bunch, and rolled 'em in his poncho; but Wall crammed his into his pocket and made 'em all stick out l...
-Chapter 47
When we got the notion into our heads, we set to work to carry it out. We didn't want to leave Aileen and mother behind. So it was settled that I was to go over and see them, and try and persuade th...
-Chapter 47. Part 2
However, last of all I saw him unhitch his horse and take the bridle on his arm, and then Aileen put on her hat and walked up to the top of the ridge along the stony track with him. Then I saw him mo...
-Chapter 47. Part 3
Aileen threw her arms round my neck and sobbed and cried like a child; she couldn't speak for a bit, and when she looked up her eyes seemed to have a different kind of look in them -- a far-away, drea...
-Chapter 48
We rode along the old track very quiet, talking about old times -- or mostly saying nothing, thinking our own thoughts. Something seemed to put it into my head to watch every turn in the track -- eve...
-Chapter 48. Part 2
As soon as Jeanie got a word from Jim that he'd sailed and was clear of Australia, she'd write up to Aileen, who was to go down to Melbourne, and take mother with her. They could stop with Jeanie unt...
-Chapter 48. Part 3
'I think I'll take Locket after all,' says he, after thinking about it best part of an hour. 'She's very fast and a stayer. Good-tempered too, and the old horse has taken up with her. It will be com...
-Chapter 49
He shook hands with me and dad, threw his leg over Rainbow, took Locket's bridle as if he was going for an easy day's ride, and cantered off. Warrigal nodded to both of us, then brought his pack-hors...
-Chapter 49. Part 2
I couldn't have believed at first that he'd be so mad. But after a bit I saw that, like a lot of his reckless doings, it wasn't so far out after all. All the papers had taken it up as usual, and tho...
-Chapter 49. Part 3
We all looked at her -- not a bad-looking woman she'd been once, though you could see she'd come down in the world and been knocked about a bit. Surely I knew her voice! I'd seen her before -- why, ...
-Chapter 49. Part 4
'As sure as we've had anything to do with her, bad luck's followed up,' says Jim; 'I'd rather have faced a trooper than seen her face again.' 'She can't do much now,' says I. 'We're across the borde...
-Chapter 49. Part 5
'I knew he had it in for me,' said I; 'but I depended on his not doing anything for fear of hurting you.' 'So I thought, too; but he expected you'd be trapped at Willaroon before there would be time ...
-Chapter 49. Part 6
Rainbow rears up, gives one spring, and falls backward with a crash. I thought Starlight was crushed underneath him, shot through the neck and flank as he was, but he saved himself somehow, and stood...
-Chapter 50
The breath was hardly out of him when a horse comes tearing through the scrub on to the little plain, with a man on his back that seemed hurt bad or drunk, he rolled in his saddle so. The head of him...
-Chapter 50. Continued
Next day, late, they rode in with their horses regularly done and knocked up, leading his horse, but no Warrigal. He had got clear away from them in the scrub, jumped off his horse when they were out...
-Chapter 51
One day I was told that a lady wanted to see me. When the door of the cell opened who should walk in but Aileen! I didn't look to have seen her. I didn't bother my head about who was coming. What ...
-Chapter 51. Continued
I did repent in that sort of way of all we'd done since that first wrong turn. It's the wrong turn-off that makes a man lose his way; but as for the rest I had only a dull, heavy feeling that my time...
-Chapter 52
The months went on till I began to think it was a long time since anything had been heard of father. I didn't expect to have a letter or anything, but I knew he must take a run outside now and again;...
-Chapter 52. Part 2
The same presumptive certainty and legal incompleteness existed concerning Mr. Bowe's short-horns (as he averred) and Mr. Dawson's Devons. 'Thou art so near and yet so far,' as a provoking stock-ri...
-Chapter 52. Part 3
Well, I could do that. I was too low and miserable to fight much when I went in; besides, I never could see the pull of kicking up rows and giving trouble in a place like that. They've got you there...
-Chapter 52. Part 4
I heard it all as if it had been the parson reading out of a book about some other man. The words went into my ears and out again. I hardly heard them, only the last word, free -- free -- free! Wha...
-Chapter 52. Part 5
'We'll get down here now,' I said, when we came near the dividing fence; 'it ain't far to walk. That's your road.' 'I'll run you up to the door,' says he, 'it isn't far; you ain't used to walking mu...









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