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Sense And Sensibility | by Jane Austen



Jane Austen (1775-1817) is considered by many scholars to be the first great woman novelist. Her novels revolve around people, not events or coincidences. Miss Austen sets her novels in the upper middle class English country which was her own environment. Her novels have increased in stature over time. Her skills of writing, including a dry humor and a witty elegance of expression have attracted generations to her work.

TitleSense And Sensibility
AuthorJane Austen
PublisherCassell
Year1908
Copyright1811, Jane Austen
AmazonSense and Sensibility
-Chapter 1
The family of Dashwood had long been settled in Sussex. Their estate was large, and their residence was at Norland Park, in the centre of their property, where, for many generations, they had lived in...
-Chapter 2
Mrs. John Dashwood now installed herself mistress of Norland; and her mother and sisters-in-law were degraded to the condition of visitors. As such, however, they were treated by her with quiet civili...
-Chapter 3
Mrs. Dashwood remained at Norland several months; not from any disinclination to move when the sight of every well known spot ceased to raise the violent emotion which it produced for a while; for whe...
-Chapter 4
What a pity it is, Elinor, said Marianne, that Edward should have no taste for drawing. No taste for drawing! replied Elinor, why should you think so? He does not draw himself, indeed, but he ...
-Chapter 5
No sooner was her answer dispatched, than Mrs. Dashwood indulged herself in the pleasure of announcing to her son-in-law and his wife that she was provided with a house, and should incommode them no l...
-Chapter 6
The first part of their journey was performed in too melancholy a disposition to be otherwise than tedious and unpleasant. But as they drew towards the end of it, their interest in the appearance of a...
-Chapter 7
Barton Park was about half a mile from the cottage. The ladies had passed near it in their way along the valley, but it was screened from their view at home by the projection of a hill. The house was ...
-Chapter 8
Mrs. Jennings was a widow with an ample jointure. She had only two daughters, both of whom she had lived to see respectably married, and she had now therefore nothing to do but to marry all the rest o...
-Chapter 9
The Dashwoods were now settled at Barton with tolerable comfort to themselves. The house and the garden, with all the objects surrounding them, were now become familiar, and the ordinary pursuits whic...
-Chapter 10
Marianne's preserver, as Margaret, with more elegance than precision, styled Willoughby, called at the cottage early the next morning to make his personal enquiries. He was received by Mrs. Dashwood w...
-Chapter 10. Continued
Marianne began now to perceive that the desperation which had seized her at sixteen and a half, of ever seeing a man who could satisfy her ideas of perfection, had been rash and unjustifiable. Willoug...
-Chapter 11
Little had Mrs. Dashwood or her daughters imagined when they first came into Devonshire, that so many engagements would arise to occupy their time as shortly presented themselves, or that they should ...
-Chapter 12
As Elinor and Marianne were walking together the next morning the latter communicated a piece of news to her sister, which in spite of all that she knew before of Marianne's imprudence and want of tho...
-Chapter 13
Their intended excursion to Whitwell turned out very different from what Elinor had expected. She was prepared to be wet through, fatigued, and frightened; but the event was still more unfortunate, fo...
-Chapter 13. Continued
Indeed! Oh, yes; and as like him as she can stare. I dare say the Colonel will leave her all his fortune. When Sir John returned, he joined most heartily in the general regret on so unfortunate ...
-Chapter 14
The sudden termination of Colonel Brandon's visit at the park, with his steadiness in concealing its cause, filled the mind, and raised the wonder of Mrs. Jennings for two or three days; she was a gre...
-Chapter 15
Mrs. Dashwood's visit to Lady Middleton took place the next day, and two of her daughters went with her; but Marianne excused herself from being of the party, under some trifling pretext of employment...
-Chapter 15. Continued
Nothing, for you have anticipated my answer. Then you would have told me, that it might or might not have happened. Oh, Elinor, how incomprehensible are your feelings! You had rather take evil upo...
-Chapter 16
Marianne would have thought herself very inexcusable had she been able to sleep at all the first night after parting from Willoughby. She would have been ashamed to look her family in the face the nex...
-Chapter 17
Mrs. Dashwood was surprised only for a moment at seeing him; for his coming to Barton was, in her opinion, of all things the most natural. Her joy and expression of regard long outlived her wonder. He...
-Chapter 18
Elinor saw, with great uneasiness the low spirits of her friend. His visit afforded her but a very partial satisfaction, while his own enjoyment in it appeared so imperfect. It was evident that he was...
-Chapter 19
Edward remained a week at the cottage; he was earnestly pressed by Mrs. Dashwood to stay longer; but, as if he were bent only on self-mortification, he seemed resolved to be gone when his enjoyment am...
-Chapter 19. Continued
Elinor sat down to her drawing-table as soon as he was out of the house, busily employed herself the whole day, neither sought nor avoided the mention of his name, appeared to interest herself almost ...
-Chapter 20
As the Miss Dashwoods entered the drawing-room of the park the next day, at one door, Mrs. Palmer came running in at the other, looking as good humoured and merry as before. She took them all most aff...
-Chapter 20. Continued
Elinor could hardly keep her countenance as she assented to the hardship of such an obligation. How charming it will be, said Charlotte, when he is in Parliament! - won't it? How I shall laugh! It...
-Chapter 21
The Palmers returned to Cleveland the next day, and the two families at Barton were again left to entertain each other. But this did not last long; Elinor had hardly got their last visitors out of her...
-Chapter 21. Continued
John is in such spirits today! said she, on his taking Miss Steeles's pocket handkerchief, and throwing it out of window - He is full of monkey tricks. And soon afterwards, on the second boy's vi...
-Chapter 22
Marianne, who had never much toleration for any thing like impertinence, vulgarity, inferiority of parts, or even difference of taste from herself, was at this time particularly ill-disposed, from the...
-Chapter 22. Continued
We have been engaged these four years. Four years! Yes. Elinor, though greatly shocked, still felt unable to believe it. I did not know, said she, that you were even acquainted till the o...
-Chapter 23
However small Elinor's general dependence on Lucy's veracity might be, it was impossible for her on serious reflection to suspect it in the present case, where no temptation could be answerable to the...
-Chapter 23. Continued
But it was not immediately that an opportunity of doing so could be commanded, though Lucy was as well disposed as herself to take advantage of any that occurred; for the weather was not often fine en...
-Chapter 24
In a firm, though cautious tone, Elinor thus began. I should be undeserving of the confidence you have honoured me with, if I felt no desire for its continuance, or no farther curiosity on its subje...
-Chapter 25
Though Mrs. Jennings was in the habit of spending a large portion of the year at the houses of her children and friends, she was not without a settled habitation of her own. Since the death of her hus...
-Chapter 26
Elinor could not find herself in the carriage with Mrs. Jennings, and beginning a journey to London under her protection, and as her guest, without wondering at her own situation, so short had their a...
-Chapter 26. Continued
Is your sister ill? said he. Elinor answered in some distress that she was, and then talked of head-aches, low spirits, and over fatigues; and of every thing to which she could decently attribute h...
-Chapter 27
If this open weather holds much longer, said Mrs. Jennings, when they met at breakfast the following morning, Sir John will not like leaving Barton next week; 'tis a sad thing for sportsmen to lose...
-Chapter 27. Continued
Mrs. Jennings soon appeared, and the note being given her, she read it aloud. It was from Lady Middleton, announcing their arrival in Conduit Street the night before, and requesting the company of her...
-Chapter 28
Nothing occurred during the next three or four days, to make Elinor regret what she had done, in applying to her mother; for Willoughby neither came nor wrote. They were engaged about the end of that ...
-Chapter 29
Before the house-maid had lit their fire the next day, or the sun gained any power over a cold, gloomy morning in January, Marianne, only half dressed, was kneeling against one of the window-seats for...
-Chapter 29. Part 2
I am, dear Madam, Your most obedient humble servant, JOHN WILLOUGHBY. With what indignation such a letter as this must be read by Miss Dashwood, may be imagined. Though aware, before she bega...
-Chapter 29. Part 3
M.D. Her second note, which had been written on the morning after the dance at the Middletons', was in these words: - I cannot express my disappointment in having missed you the day before yester...
-Chapter 30
Mrs. Jennings came immediately to their room on her return, and without waiting to have her request of admittance answered, opened the door and walked in with a look of real concern. How do you do m...
-Chapter 30. Continued
Dear ma'am, this kindness is quite unnecessary. Marianne, I dare say, will not leave her room again this evening. I shall persuade her if I can to go early to bed, for I am sure she wants rest. Ay...
-Chapter 31
From a night of more sleep than she had expected, Marianne awoke the next morning to the same consciousness of misery in which she had closed her eyes. Elinor encouraged her as much as possible to ta...
-Chapter 31. Part 2
I met Mrs. Jennings in Bond Street, said he, after the first salutation, and she encouraged me to come on; and I was the more easily encouraged, because I thought it probable that I might find you ...
-Chapter 31. Part 3
Again he stopped to recover himself; and Elinor spoke her feelings in an exclamation of tender concern, at the fate of his unfortunate friend. Your sister, I hope, cannot be offended, said he, by ...
-Chapter 32
When the particulars of this conversation were repeated by Miss Dashwood to her sister, as they very soon were, the effect on her was not entirely such as the former had hoped to see. Not that Mariann...
-Chapter 32. Continued
The rest of Mrs. Palmer's sympathy was shewn in procuring all the particulars in her power of the approaching marriage, and communicating them to Elinor. She could soon tell at what coachmaker's the n...
-Chapter 33
After some opposition, Marianne yielded to her sister's entreaties, and consented to go out with her and Mrs. Jennings one morning for half an hour. She expressly conditioned, however, for paying no v...
-Chapter 33. Continued
Who is Colonel Brandon? Is he a man of fortune? Yes; he has very good property in Dorsetshire. I am glad of it. He seems a most gentlemanlike man; and I think, Elinor, I may congratulate you on...
-Chapter 34
Mrs. John Dashwood had so much confidence in her husband's judgment, that she waited the very next day both on Mrs. Jennings and her daughter; and her confidence was rewarded by finding even the forme...
-Chapter 34. Continued
Mrs. Ferrars was a little, thin woman, upright, even to formality, in her figure, and serious, even to sourness, in her aspect. Her complexion was sallow; and her features small, without beauty, and n...
-Chapter 35
Elinor's curiosity to see Mrs. Ferrars was satisfied. - She had found in her every thing that could tend to make a farther connection between the families undesirable. - She had seen enough of her pri...
-Chapter 35. Continued
Her manners gave some re-assurance to Edward, and he had courage enough to sit down; but his embarrassment still exceeded that of the ladies in a proportion, which the case rendered reasonable, though...
-Chapter 36
Within a few days after this meeting, the newspapers announced to the world, that the lady of Thomas Palmer, Esq. was safely delivered of a son and heir; a very interesting and satisfactory paragraph,...
-Chapter 36. Continued
To her dress and appearance she was grown so perfectly indifferent, as not to bestow half the consideration on it, during the whole of her toilet, which it received from Miss Steele in the first five ...
-Chapter 37
Mrs. Palmer was so well at the end of a fortnight, that her mother felt it no longer necessary to give up the whole of her time to her; and, contenting herself with visiting her once or twice a day, r...
-Chapter 37. Part 2
Here Mrs. Jennings ceased, and as Elinor had had time enough to collect her thoughts, she was able to give such an answer, and make such observations, as the subject might naturally be supposed to pro...
-Chapter 37. Part 3
If such is your way of thinking, said Marianne, if the loss of what is most valued is so easily to be made up by something else, your resolution, your self-command, are, perhaps, a little less to b...
-Chapter 37. Part 4
Here Marianne, in an ecstasy of indignation, clapped her hands together, and cried, Gracious God! can this be possible! Well may you wonder, Marianne, replied her brother, at the obstinacy which...
-Chapter 38
Mrs. Jennings was very warm in her praise of Edward's conduct, but only Elinor and Marianne understood its true merit. THEY only knew how little he had had to tempt him to be disobedient, and how smal...
-Chapter 38. Continued
I do not understand what you mean by interrupting them, said Elinor; you were all in the same room together, were not you? No, indeed, not us. La! Miss Dashwood, do you think people make love wh...
-Chapter 39
The Miss Dashwoods had now been rather more than two months in town, and Marianne's impatience to be gone increased every day. She sighed for the air, the liberty, the quiet of the country; and fancie...
-Chapter 40
Well, Miss Dashwood, said Mrs. Jennings, sagaciously smiling, as soon as the gentleman had withdrawn, I do not ask you what the Colonel has been saying to you; for though, upon my honour, I TRIED t...
-Chapter 40. Continued
Mrs. Jennings told me, said he, that you wished to speak with me, at least I understood her so - or I certainly should not have intruded on you in such a manner; though at the same time, I should h...
-Chapter 41
Edward, having carried his thanks to Colonel Brandon, proceeded with his happiness to Lucy; and such was the excess of it by the time he reached Bartlett's Buildings, that she was able to assure Mrs. ...
-Chapter 41. Continued
Ah! Elinor, said John, your reasoning is very good, but it is founded on ignorance of human nature. When Edward's unhappy match takes place, depend upon it his mother will feel as much as if she ha...
-Chapter 42
One other short call in Harley Street, in which Elinor received her brother's congratulations on their travelling so far towards Barton without any expense, and on Colonel Brandon's being to follow th...
-Chapter 43
Marianne got up the next morning at her usual time; to every inquiry replied that she was better, and tried to prove herself so, by engaging in her accustomary employments. But a day spent in sitting ...
-Chapter 43. Part 2
But the day did not close so auspiciously as it began. - Towards the evening Marianne became ill again, growing more heavy, restless, and uncomfortable than before. Her sister, however, still sanguine...
-Chapter 43. Part 3
Mr. Harris was punctual in his second visit; - but he came to be disappointed in his hopes of what the last would produce. His medicines had failed; - the fever was unabated; and Marianne only more qu...
-Chapter 44
Elinor, starting back with a look of horror at the sight of him, obeyed the first impulse of her heart in turning instantly to quit the room, and her hand was already on the lock, when its action was ...
-Chapter 44. Part 2
I insist on you hearing the whole of it, he replied, My fortune was never large, and I had always been expensive, always in the habit of associating with people of better income than myself. Every ...
-Chapter 44. Part 3
Why did you call, Mr. Willoughby? said Elinor, reproachfully; a note would have answered every purpose. - Why was it necessary to call? It was necessary to my own pride. I could not bear to leav...
-Chapter 44. Part 4
A short pause of mutual thoughtfulness succeeded. Willoughby first rousing himself, broke it thus: Well, let me make haste and be gone. Your sister is certainly better, certainly out of danger? W...
-Chapter 44. Part 5
Elinor made no answer. Her thoughts were silently fixed on the irreparable injury which too early an independence and its consequent habits of idleness, dissipation, and luxury, had made in the mind, ...
-Chapter 45
Elinor, for some time after he left her, for some time even after the sound of his carriage had died away, remained too much oppressed by a crowd of ideas, widely differing in themselves, but of which...
-Chapter 45. Continued
You are never like me, dear Elinor, or I should wonder at your composure now. Had I sat down to wish for any possible good to my family, I should have fixed on Colonel Brandon's marrying one of you a...
-Chapter 46
Marianne's illness, though weakening in its kind, had not been long enough to make her recovery slow; and with youth, natural strength, and her mother's presence in aid, it proceeded so smoothly as to...
-Chapter 46. Continued
When the weather is settled, and I have recovered my strength, said she, we will take long walks together every day. We will walk to the farm at the edge of the down, and see how the children go on...
-Chapter 47
Mrs. Dashwood did not hear unmoved the vindication of her former favourite. She rejoiced in his being cleared from some part of his imputed guilt; - she was sorry for him; - she wished him happy. But ...
-Chapter 47. Continued
Marianne would not let her proceed; - and Elinor, satisfied that each felt their own error, wished to avoid any survey of the past that might weaken her sister's spirits; she, therefore, pursuing the ...
-Chapter 48
Elinor now found the difference between the expectation of an unpleasant event, however certain the mind may be told to consider it, and certainty itself. She now found, that in spite of herself, she ...
-Chapter 49
Unaccountable, however, as the circumstances of his release might appear to the whole family, it was certain that Edward was free; and to what purpose that freedom would be employed was easily pre-det...
-Chapter 49. Part 2
Lucy's marriage, the unceasing and reasonable wonder among them all, formed of course one of the earliest discussions of the lovers; - and Elinor's particular knowledge of each party made it appear to...
-Chapter 49. Part 3
I thought it my duty, said he, independent of my feelings, to give her the option of continuing the engagement or not, when I was renounced by my mother, and stood to all appearance without a frien...
-Chapter 49. Part 4
The letters from town, which a few days before would have made every nerve in Elinor's body thrill with transport, now arrived to be read with less emotion that mirth. Mrs. Jennings wrote to tell the ...
-Chapter 50
After a proper resistance on the part of Mrs. Ferrars, just so violent and so steady as to preserve her from that reproach which she always seemed fearful of incurring, the reproach of being too amiab...
-Chapter 50. Continued
What Edward had done to forfeit the right of eldest son, might have puzzled many people to find out; and what Robert had done to succeed to it, might have puzzled them still more. It was an arrangemen...









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