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The Last Of The Mohicans. A Narrative Of 1757 | by James Fenimore Cooper



It is believed that the scene of this tale, and most of the information necessary to understand its allusions, are rendered sufficiently obvious to the reader in the text itself, or in the accompanying notes. Still there is so much obscurity in the Indian traditions, and so much confusion in the Indian names, as to render some explanation useful...

TitleThe Last Of The Mohicans. A Narrative Of 1757
AuthorJames Fenimore Cooper
PublisherJohn W. Lovell Company
Year1919
Copyright1919, John W. Lovell Company
AmazonThe Last of the Mohicans (The Classic Collection)
-Introduction
It is believed that the scene of this tale, and most of the information necessary to understand its allusions, are rendered sufficiently obvious to the reader in the text itself, or in the accompanyin...
-Chapter 1
Mine ear is open, and my heart prepared: The worst is wordly loss thou canst unfold: - Say, is my kingdom lost? - Shakespeare It was a feature peculiar to the colonial wars of North Americ...
-Chapter 1. Part 2
* Washington, who, after uselessly admonishing the European general of the danger into which he was heedlessly running, saved the remnants of the British army, on this occasion, by his decisi...
-Chapter 1. Part 3
The deepest sounds of the retiring and invisible column had ceased to be borne on the breeze to the listeners, and the latest straggler had already disappeared in pursuit; but there still remained the...
-Chapter 1. Part 4
It is impossible to say what unlooked-for remark this short and silent communication, between two such singular men, might have elicited from the white man, had not his active curiosity been again dra...
-Chapter 2
Sola, sola, wo ha, ho, sola! - Shakespeare While one of the lovely beings we have so cursorily presented to the reader was thus lost in thought, the other quickly recovered from the alarm wh...
-Chapter 2. Part 2
Notwithstanding a constant application of his one armed heel to the flanks of the mare, the most confirmed gait that he could establish was a Canterbury gallop with the hind legs, in which those more ...
-Chapter 2. Part 3
It is refreshing both to the spirits and to the body to indulge in psalmody, in befitting seasons, returned the master of song, unhesitatingly complying with her intimation to follow; and nothing w...
-Chapter 3
Before these fields were shorn and till'd, Full to the brim our rivers flow'd; The melody of waters fill'd The fresh and boundless wood; And torrents dash'd, and rivulets play'd, And fou...
-Chapter 3. Part 2
* The Mississippi. The scout alludes to a tradition which is very popular among the tribes of the Atlantic states. Evidence of their Asiatic origin is deduced from the circumstances, though g...
-Chapter 3. Part 3
All this I have heard and believe, said the white man, observing that the Indian paused; but it was long before the English came into the country. A pine grew then where this chestnut now stands...
-Chapter 4
Well go thy way: thou shalt not from this grove Till I torment thee for this injury. - Midsummer Night's Dream. The words were still in the mouth of the scout, when the leader of the party, ...
-Chapter 4. Part 2
The Sixtieth! you can tell me little of the Royal Americans that I don't know, though I do wear a hunting-shirt instead of a scarlet jacket. Well, then, among other things, you may know the name o...
-Chapter 4. Part 3
Heyward prepared to comply, though with strong disgust at the nature of the office he was compelled to execute. Each moment, however, pressed upon him a conviction of the critical situation in which h...
-Chapter 5
...In such a night Did This be fearfully o'ertrip the dew; And saw the lion's shadow ere himself. - Merchant of Venice The suddenness of the flight of his guide, and the wild cries of the ...
-Chapter 5. Part 2
I will do my utmost to see both these conditions fulfilled. Then follow, for we are losing moments that are as precious as the heart's blood to a stricken deer! Heyward could distinguish the imp...
-Chapter 5. Part 3
The river was confined between high and cragged rocks, one of which impended above the spot where the canoe rested. As these, again, were surmounted by tall trees, which appeared to totter on the brow...
-Chapter 6
Those strains that once did sweet in Zion glide; He wales a portion with judicious care; And 'Let us worship God', he says, with solemn air. - Burns Heyward and his female companions witne...
-Chapter 6. Part 2
Are we quite safe in this cavern? demanded Heyward. Is there no danger of surprise? A single armed man, at its entrance, would hold us at his mercy. A spectral-looking figure stalked from out of ...
-Chapter 6. Part 3
In the meanwhile, the gravity of Chingcachgook remained immovable. He had seated himself more within the circle of light, where the frequent, uneasy glances of his guests were better enabled to separa...
-Chapter 6. Part 4
What is it? murmured Alice, after a few moments of terrible suspense. What is it? repeated Hewyard aloud. Neither Hawkeye nor the Indians made any reply. They listened, as if expecting the sound...
-Chapter 7
They do not sleep, On yonder cliffs, a grizzly band, I see them sit. - Gray 'Twould be neglecting a warning that is given for our good to lie hid any longer, said Hawkeye when such soun...
-Chapter 7. Part 2
We have been like hunters who have lost the points of the heavens, and from whom the sun has been hid for days, said Hawkeye, turning away from his companions; now we begin again to know the signs ...
-Chapter 7. Part 3
Duncan seized the favorable moment to spring to the body of Gamut, which he bore within the shelter of the narrow chasm that protected the sisters. In another minute the whole party was collected in t...
-Chapter 7. Part 4
Heyward lifted his head from the cover, and beheld what he justly considered a prodigy of rashness and skill. The river had worn away the edge of the soft rock in such a manner as to render its first ...
-Chapter 8
They linger yet, Avengers of their native land. - Gray The warning call of the scout was not uttered without occasion. During the occurrence of the deadly encounter just related, the roar of...
-Chapter 8. Part 2
At length, emboldened by the long and patient watchfulness of his enemies, the Huron attempted a better and more fatal aim. The quick eyes of the Mohicans caught the dark line of his lower limbs incau...
-Chapter 8. Part 3
With what? coolly demanded the scout. The arrows of Uncas, or such tears as women shed! No, no; you are young, and rich, and have friends, and at such an age I know it is hard to die! But, glancin...
-Chapter 9
Be gay securely; Dispel, my fair, with smiles, the tim'rous clouds, That hang on thy clear brow. - Death of Agrippina The sudden and almost magical change, from the stirring incidents of t...
-Chapter 9. Part 2
David alone formed an exception to these varying emotions. A gleam of light from the opening crossed his wan countenance, and fell upon the pages of the little volume, whose leaves he was again occupi...
-Chapter 9. Part 3
As the inner passages to the two caves were so close to each other, Duncan, believing that escape was no longer possible, passed David and the sisters, to place himself between the latter and the firs...
-Chapter 10
I fear we shall outsleep the coming morn As much as we this night have overwatched! - Midsummer Night's Dream The instant the shock of this sudden misfortune had abated, Duncan began to ma...
-Chapter 10. Part 2
Here is some confusion in names between us, Le Renard, said Duncan, hoping to provoke a discussion. Daim is the French for deer, and cerf for stag; elan is the true term, when one would speak of an...
-Chapter 10. Part 3
Here was held another short but earnest consultation, during which the horses, to whose panic their owners ascribed their heaviest misfortune, were led from the cover of the woods, and brought to the ...
-Chapter 10. Part 4
Do friends make such marks? Would 'La Longue Carbine' cut one so slight on an enemy? Do the Delawares crawl upon those they love like snakes, twisting themselves to strike? Would 'Le Gros Se...
-Chapter 11
Cursed be my tribe If I forgive him. - Shylock The Indian had selected for this desirable purpose one of those steep, pyramidal hills, which bear a strong resemblance to artificial mounds, a...
-Chapter 11. Part 2
Something like this I had heard before, said Cora, observing that he paused to suppress those passions which began to burn with too bright a flame, as he recalled the recollection of his supposed in...
-Chapter 11. Part 3
When the blows scorched the back of the Huron, he would know where to find a woman to feel the smart. The daughter of Munro would draw his water, hoe his corn, and cook his venison. The body of the g...
-Chapter 11. Part 4
Two powerful warriors cast themselves on Heyward, while another was occupied in securing the less active singing-master. Neither of the captives, however, submitted without a desperate, though fruitle...
-Chapter 12
Clo. - I am gone, sire, And anon, sire, I'll be with you again. - Twelfth Night The Hurons stood aghast at this sudden visitation of death on one of their band. But as they regarded the fa...
-Chapter 12. Part 2
Well done for the Delawares! victory to the Mohicans! cried Hawkeye, once more elevating the butt of the long and fatal rifle; a finishing blow from a man without a cross will never tell against hi...
-Chapter 12. Part 3
The thing is but a trifle, and what you may often see if you tarry long among us, returned the scout, a good deal softened toward the man of song, by this unequivocal expression of gratitude. I hav...
-Chapter 12. Part 4
When the foresters had made their selection, and distributed their prizes, the scout announced that the hour had arrived when it was necessary to move. By this time the song of Gamut had ceased, and t...
-Chapter 12. Part 5
To what, then, are we indebted for our safety? To what, as a white man who has no taint of Indian blood, I should be ashamed to own; to the judgment of the young Mohican, in matters which I should...
-Chapter 13
I'll seek a readier path. - Parnell The route taken by Hawkeye lay across those sandy plains, relived by occasional valleys and swells of land, which had been traversed by their party on the...
-Chapter 13. Part 2
Heyward and the sisters arose, on the instant, from the grassy sepulcher; nor could the two latter, notwithstanding the terrific scenes they had so recently passed through, entirely suppress an emotio...
-Chapter 13. Part 3
For many minutes Duncan succeeded in keeping his senses on the alert, and alive to every moaning sound that arose from the forest. His vision became more acute as the shades of evening settled on the ...
-Chapter 13. Part 4
The knaves know our weakness, whispered Hawkeye, who stood by the side of Heyward, in deep shade, looking through an opening in the logs, or they wouldn't indulge their idleness in such a squaw's m...
-Chapter 14
Guard. - Qui est la? Puc. - Paisans, pauvres gens de France. - King Henry VI During the rapid movement from the blockhouse, and until the party was deeply buried in the forest, each indivi...
-Chapter 14. Part 2
'Tis not probable that any are as houseless as ourselves in this dreary forest. Such as he may care but little for house or shelter, and night dew can never wet a body that passes its days in the ...
-Chapter 14. Part 3
Let it be done, and that instantly. Further words were unnecessary; for Hawkeye, merely uttering the mandate to follow, moved along the route by which they had just entered their present critical...
-Chapter 14. Part 4
But the spectacle which most concerned the young soldier was on the western bank of the lake, though quite near to its southern termination. On a strip of land, which appeared from his stand too narro...
-Chapter 14. Part 5
They had made their little circuit to the left, and were already inclining again toward the right, having, as Heyward thought, got over nearly half the distance to the friendly works, when his ears we...
-Chapter 15
Then go we in, to know his embassy; Which I could, with ready guess, declare, Before the Frenchmen speak a word of it. - King Henry V A few succeeding days were passed amid the privation...
-Chapter 15. Part 2
Duncan had stood in a musing attitude, contemplating this scene a few minutes, when his eyes were directed to the glacis in front of the sally-port already mentioned, by the sounds of approaching foot...
-Chapter 15. Part 3
The fidelity of 'The Long Rifle' is well known to me, returned Munro, and is above suspicion; though his usual good fortune seems, at last, to have failed. Montcalm has got him, and with the accurs...
-Chapter 15. Part 4
The marquis of Montcalm was, at the period of which we write, in the flower of his age, and, it may be added, in the zenith of his fortunes. But even in that enviable situation, he was affable, and di...
-Chapter 16
EDG. - Before you fight the battle ope this letter. - Lear Major Heyward found Munro attended only by his daughters. Alice sat upon his knee, parting the gray hairs on the forehead of the ol...
-Chapter 16. Part 2
You would be my son, Duncan, and you're ignorant of the history of the man you wish to call your father. Sit ye down, young man, and I will open to you the wounds of a seared heart, in as few words a...
-Chapter 16. Part 3
Duncan, who believed it of the last importance that they should speedily come to the contents of the letter borne by the scout, gladly encouraged this idea. Without doubt, he could gather no confide...
-Chapter 16. Part 4
I have solicited this interview from your superior, monsieur, he said, because I believe he will allow himself to be persuaded that he has already done everything which is necessary for the honor o...
-Chapter 17
Weave we the woof. The thread is spun. The web is wove. The work is done. - Gray The hostile armies, which lay in the wilds of the Horican, passed the night of the ninth of August, 1757,...
-Chapter 17. Part 2
What can the Hurons do? returned the savage, speaking also, though imperfectly, in the French language. Not a warrior has a scalp, and the pale faces make friends! Ha, Le Renard Subtil! Methink...
-Chapter 17. Part 3
To-day I am only a soldier, Major Heyward, said the veteran. All that you see here, claim alike to be my children. Duncan had heard enough. Without losing one of those moments which had now becom...
-Chapter 17. Part 4
As the confused and timid throng left the protecting mounds of the fort, and issued on the open plain, the whole scene was at once presented to their eyes. At a little distance on the right, and somew...
-Chapter 17. Part 5
Father - father - we are here! shrieked Alice, as he passed, at no great distance, without appearing to heed them. Come to us, father, or we die! The cry was repeated, and in terms and tones that...
-Chapter 18
Why, anything; An honorable murderer, if you will; For naught I did in hate, but all in honor. - Othello The bloody and inhuman scene rather incidentally mentioned than described in the ...
-Chapter 18. Part 2
The effects produced by the appalling sights that constantly arose in their path to the lake shore, were as different as the characters of the respective individuals who composed the party. The youth ...
-Chapter 18. Part 3
What is it, boy? whispered the scout, lowering his tall form into a crouching attitude, like a panther about to take his leap; God send it be a tardy Frencher, skulking for plunder. I do believe 'k...
-Chapter 18. Part 4
When the Indian had complied, the scout received the prize, and holding it on high, he laughed in his silent but heartfelt manner. 'Tis the tooting we'pon of the singer! now we shall have a trail a ...
-Chapter 19
Salar. - Why, I am sure, if he forfeit, thou wilt not take his flesh; what's that good for? Shy. - To bait fish withal; if it will feed nothing else, it will feed my revenge. - Merchant o...
-Chapter 19. Part 2
It is difficult to account for the feelings that may attend the last great change. It would be a change, indeed, for a man who has passed his days in the open air, returned the single-minded scou...
-Chapter 19. Part 3
There goes Uncas! said the scout; the boy bears a smart piece! I know its crack, as well as a father knows the language of his child, for I carried the gun myself until a better offered. What ca...
-Chapter 19. Part 4
I regret to hear it; for I had believed those natives who dwelt within our boundaries had found us too just and liberal, not to identify themselves fully with our quarrels. Why, I believe it is na...
-Chapter 20
Land of Albania! let me bend mine eyes On thee; thou rugged nurse of savage men! - Childe Harold The heavens were still studded with stars, when Hawkeye came to arouse the sleepers. Castin...
-Chapter 20. Part 2
* The beauties of Lake George are well known to every American tourist. In the height of the mountains which surround it, and in artificial accessories, it is inferior to the finest of the Sw...
-Chapter 20. Part 3
What, now, lad? demanded Hawkeye; you save a Huron from the death-shriek by that word; have you reason for what you do? Uncas pointed toward a rocky shore a little in their front, whence another ...
-Chapter 20. Part 4
The knaves love to hear the sounds of their pieces; but the eye is not to be found among the Mingoes that can calculate a true range in a dancing canoe! You see the dumb devils have taken off a man t...
-Chapter 21
If you find a man there, he shall die a flea's death. - Merry Wives of Windsor. The party had landed on the border of a region that is, even to this day, less known to the inhabitants of the...
-Chapter 21. Part 2
By the middle of the afternoon they had passed the Scaroons, and were following the route of the declining sun. After descending an eminence to a low bottom, through which a swift stream glided, they ...
-Chapter 21. Part 3
It was fortunate they did so. For the quick and active Uncas soon found the impression of a foot on a bunch of moss, where it would seem an Indian had inadvertently trodden. Pursuing the direction giv...
-Chapter 21. Part 4
The young man started, and recoiled a few paces instinctively, when he found himself within a hundred yards of a stranger Indian. Recovering his recollection on the instant, instead of sounding an ala...
-Chapter 22
Bot. - Abibl we all met? Qui. - Pat - pat; and here's a marvelous convenient place for our rehearsal. - Midsummer Night's Dream The reader may better imagine, than we describe the surpri...
-Chapter 22. Part 2
Gamut received his pitch-pipe with as strong an expression of pleasure as he believed compatible with the grave functions he exercised. After essaying its virtues repeatedly, in contrast with his own ...
-Chapter 22. Part 3
We have found that which may be good or evil to us, as heaven disposes. The Sagamore is of the high blood of the Delawares, and is the great chief of their Tortoises! That some of this stock are amon...
-Chapter 22. Part 4
When he was thought to be sufficiently painted, the scout gave him much friendly advice; concerted signals, and appointed the place where they should meet, in the event of mutual success. The parting ...
-Chapter 23
But though the beast of game The privilege of chase may claim; Though space and law the stag we lend Ere hound we slip, or bow we bend; Whoever recked, where, how, or when The prowling f...
-Chapter 23. Part 2
A long and grave pause succeeded, during which no movement of a limb, nor any expression of an eye, betrayed the expression produced by his remark. Duncan, who knew that silence was a virtue among his...
-Chapter 23. Part 3
Large piles of brush lay scattered about the clearing, and a wary and aged squaw was occupied in firing as many as might serve to light the coming exhibition. As the flame arose, its power exceeded th...
-Chapter 23. Part 4
There was no term of abuse known to the Huron vocabulary that the disappointed women did not lavishly expend on the successful stranger. They flouted at his efforts, and told him, with bitter scoffs, ...
-Chapter 23. Part 5
Seven nights, and as many summer days, have I fasted on the trail of the Hurons, Uncas coldly replied; the children of the Lenape know how to travel the path of the just without lingering to eat. ...
-Chapter 24
Thus spoke the sage: the kings without delay Dissolve the council, and their chief obey. - Pope's Iliad A single moment served to convince the youth that he was mistaken. A hand was laid, ...
-Chapter 24. Part 2
Welcome! one at length uttered; has my friend found the moose? The young men stagger under their burdens, returned Magua. Let 'Reed-that-bends' go on the hunting path; he will meet them. A d...
-Chapter 24. Part 3
Magua caught the expression, and raising his arm, he shook it at the captive, the light silver ornaments attached to his bracelet rattling with the trembling agitation of the limb, as, in a tone of ve...
-Chapter 24. Part 4
No! said Magua, after satisfying himself of the safety of the captive; the sun must shine on his shame; the squaws must see his flesh tremble, or our revenge will be like the play of boys. Go! take...
-Chapter 25
Snug. - Have you the lion's part written? Pray you, if it be, give it to me, for I am slow of study. Quince. - You may do it extempore, for it is nothing but roaring. - Midsummer Night's ...
-Chapter 25. Part 2
And admirably did you enact the character; the animal itself might have been shamed by the representation. Lord, major, returned the flattered woodsman, I should be but a poor scholar for one wh...
-Chapter 25. Part 3
And, dearest Cora, Duncan; surely Cora was not forgotten? Not forgotten! no; regretted, as woman was seldom mourned before. Your venerable father knew no difference between his children; but I - A...
-Chapter 25. Part 4
Hugh! Ay, you've found your tongue, said his undisturbed conqueror; now, in order that you shall not use it to our ruin, I must make free to stop your mouth. As there was no time to be lost, t...
-Chapter 26
Bot. - Let me play the lion too. - Midsummer Night's Dream Notwithstanding the high resolution of Hawkeye he fully comprehended all the difficulties and danger he was about to incur. In his ...
-Chapter 26. Part 2
No more words, but lead on, returned Hawkeye, concealing his face again, and setting the example in his own person, by instantly quitting the lodge. As they proceeded, the scout ascertained that hi...
-Chapter 26. Part 3
Hawkeye! Cut his bands, said Hawkeye to David, who just then approached them. The singer did as he was ordered, and Uncas found his limbs released. At the same moment the dried skin of the anima...
-Chapter 26. Part 4
Hold! said David, perceiving that with this assurance they were about to leave him; I am an unworthy and humble follower of one who taught not the damnable principle of revenge. Should I fall, ther...
-Chapter 27
Ant. I shall remember: When C'sar says Do this, it is performed. - Julius Caesar The impatience of the savages who lingered about the prison of Uncas, as has been seen, had overcome their ...
-Chapter 27. Part 2
It was happy for Uncas and the scout, and even David, that they were all beyond the reach of his arm at such a moment; for, assuredly, no refinement in cruelty would then have deferred their deaths, i...
-Chapter 27. Part 3
But, while he was making this ostensible sacrifice to general considerations, Magua never lost sight of his individual motives. The latter had been frustrated by the unlooked-for events which had plac...
-Chapter 28
Brief, I pray for you; for you see, 'tis a busy time with me. - Much Ado About Nothing. The tribe, or rather half tribe, of Delawares, which has been so often mentioned, and whose present pl...
-Chapter 28. Part 2
The Delaware gravely bowed his acquiescence to what he knew to be false, and continued: The tomahawks of your young men have been very red. It is so; but they are now bright and dull; for the Yen...
-Chapter 28. Part 3
Will he think so when he hears that his greatest enemy is fed in the camp of his children? When he is told a bloody Yengee smokes at your fire? That the pale face who has slain so many of his friends...
-Chapter 29
The assembly seated, rising o'er the rest, Achilles thus the king of men addressed. - Pope's Illiad Cora stood foremost among the prisoners, entwining her arms in those of Alice, in the te...
-Chapter 29. Part 2
Can the pale face beat it? Yes, Huron! exclaimed the scout, raising the short rifle in his right hand, and shaking it at Magua, with as much apparent ease as if it were a reed; yes, Huron, I cou...
-Chapter 29. Part 3
Ah! had I that piece which furnished the name you use, I would obligate myself to cut the thong, and drop the gourd without breaking it! returned Hawkeye, perfectly undisturbed by the other's manner...
-Chapter 29. Part 4
As the voice of the speaker suddenly ceased, every face and all eyes turned, by a common movement, toward the venerable Tamenund. From the moment that he took his seat, until the present instant, the ...
-Chapter 30
If you deny me, fie upon your law! There is no force in the decrees of Venice: I stand for judgment: answer, shall I have it? - Merchant of Venice The silence continued unbroken by human...
-Chapter 30. Part 2
For a single instant Uncas enjoyed his triumph, smiling calmly on the scene. Then motioning the crowd away with a high and haughty sweep of his arm, he advanced in front of the nation with the air of ...
-Chapter 30. Part 3
The pale face has slain my young men; his name is great for the blows he has struck the Lenape. If a Mingo has whispered that much in the ear of the Delaware, he has only shown that he is a singin...
-Chapter 30. Part 4
Well, then, added the scout, with the musing air of a man who had not half made up his mind; I will throw 'killdeer' into the bargain. Take the word of an experienced hunter, the piece has not its ...
-Chapter 31
Flue. - Kill the poys and the luggage! 'Tis expressly against the law of arms; 'tis as arrant a piece of knavery, mark you now, as can be offered in the 'orld. - King Henry V. So long as...
-Chapter 31. Part 2
The whole face of the encampment was instantly changed. The warriors, who were already armed and painted, became as still as if they were incapable of any uncommon burst of emotion. On the other hand,...
-Chapter 31. Part 3
Their entrance into the forest was perfectly unmolested; nor did they encounter any living objects that could either give the alarm, or furnish the intelligence they needed, until they came upon the l...
-Chapter 32
But plagues shall spread, and funeral fires increase, Till the great king, without a ransom paid, To her own Chrysa send the black-eyed maid. - Pope. During the time Uncas was making thi...
-Chapter 32. Part 2
We are likely to have a good day for a fight, he said, in English, addressing Heyward, and glancing his eyes upward at the clouds, which began to move in broad sheets across the firmament; a bright...
-Chapter 32. Part 3
In this crisis, Hawkeye found means to get behind the same tree as that which served for a cover to Heyward; most of his own combatants being within call, a little on his right, where they maintained ...
-Chapter 32. Part 4
The fight is coming up the ascent, said Duncan, pointing in the direction of a new explosion of firearms; we are too much in the center of their line to be effective. They will incline into the ...
-Chapter 32. Part 5
Still Uncas kept his eye on Magua, as if life to him possessed but a single object. Heyward and the scout still pressed on his rear, actuated, though possibly in a less degree, by a common feeling. Bu...
-Chapter 33
They fought, like brave men, long and well, They piled that ground with Moslem slain, They conquered - but Bozzaris fell, Bleeding at every vein. His few surviving comrades saw His smile...
-Chapter 33. Part 2
At length, the sage of the Delawares stretched forth an arm, and leaning on the shoulders of his attendants, he arose with an air as feeble as if another age had already intervened between the man who...
-Chapter 33. Part 3
During these and similar songs nothing was audible but the murmurs of the music; relieved, as it was, or rather rendered terrible, by those occasional bursts of grief which might be called its choruse...
-Chapter 33. Part 4
My daughters have done well; the white men thank them. Satisfied with this testimony in their favor, the girls proceeded to deposit the body in a shell, ingeniously, and not inelegantly, fabricated...









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