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American Fish And How To Catch Them. A Hand-Book For Fishing | by W. C. Weidemeyer



The author of this volume has taken pains to make it a practical manual for amateur as well as professional anglers. The disciple of Isaak Walton will find that, while the subject matter is condensed and made free from technicality and literary extension, nothing of value has been omitted. The work covers a ground embraced by no other volume, and will prove valuable as a reference-book to all lovers of the gentle art. The extent of the territory and waters referred to does not range beyond the inland streams and sea-coast of our Eastern and Middle States. Apart from a few kinds of fish that swim in the great chain of Northern Lakes, save Black Freshwater Bass and Pike-Perch, hardly anyvarieties occur inland, toward the Mississippi River, that draw the attention of either naturalist or angler. Not until the shores of the far Pacific are reached does angling again become remunerative and interesting.

TitleAmerican Fish And How To Catch Them. A Hand-Book For Fishing
AuthorW. C. Weidemeyer
PublisherTrow's Printing And Bookbinding Company, New York
Year1884
Copyright1884, By Francis P. Harper
AmazonAmerican fish and how to catch them: A hand-book for fishing
-Implements
Rods. The strongest and most elastic are of split bamboo ; ash-wood and lance-wood are sometimes used. For fish of from two to three pounds, rods of from six ...
-Localities
Maine. Large Rivers. Salmon. Small Rivers. Black Bass, Sucker, Perch, Trout. Lakes. Trout, Perch, Pickerel, Pike-Perch. Bays and Coast. Bass, Mackerel, Weak- ...
-Trolling In Barnegat Bay
In the lower end of Barnegat Bay, south of the inlet, there are numbers of pound and gill seines set, and quantities of fine fish are caught in them ; but that ...
-Memoranda
An angler standing without motion is unheeded by the fish. As a general thing he should be concealed. It is well to be attired in plain, dark clothing and wear ...
-Black Fresh-Water Bass. Centrarchus Fasciatus
Commonly known as Black Bass. This fish inhabits the lakes and rivers of the Middle and New England States, including the Niagara and St. Lawrence Rivers. They ...
-Oswego Bass
We are not familiar with the scientific name of this species. It is frequently confounded with the fresh-water Black Bass, but seems to differ in several ...
-Rock Bass. Centrarchus Neus
Sometimes called Fresh-water Bass. Found in all the Great Northern Lakes ; also in Champlain Lake, Oneida Lake, and other lakes ; also in the Upper Hud-son and ...
-Spotted Bass
Its scientific name is unknown to us, and its habits are unfamiliar. >A fresh-water fish, of good flavor. Said to be common in the inland waters of the Middle ...
-Sea-Bass. Centropristes Nigricans
More correctly Black Sea-Bass. Come to New York in shoals from the South, and continue from May to August. Black Sea-Bass are deep-water bottom-feeders, fond ...
-Striped Sea-Bass. Labrax Lineatus
Also known as Striped Bass and Rock-fish. Found off the coast and in bays and estuaries from Maine to Carolina. They breed at the fresh-water heads of ocean- ...
-Sucker. Catostomis Communis,
Also known as u Common Sucker and Chub. Found in the Hudson and Delaware Rivers and their tributaries; also in other rivers and many of the lakes of the Middle ...
-Shad. Alosa Prstabilis
Are rarely angled for in Northern waters, but taken in large numbers with gill-nets, as they ascend rivers from the sea. These they enter and descend for the ...
-Mackerel. Scomber Vernalis
Also known as Spring Mackerel. The well-known crop fish that haunts the Northern American Continent in countless numbers. Very plenty off the coast of Maine ...
-Spanish Mackerel. Scomber Co Lias
A highly prized variety. Most frequent southward, but ranging from Georgia to Massachusetts. In New York they are taken during August and September. A ...
-Blue-Fish. Temnodon Saltator
ALSO known as Horse-Mackerel and Green-fish. Their arrival in numbers off the shores of Long Island was first remarked in 1817. Before that time they were ...
-Yellow Perch. Perca Flavescens
Also known as American Yellow Perch. Usual weight from one to three pounds. Common in the interior streams and lakes of New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, and the ...
-Pike-Perch. Lucioperca Americana
Vulgo, Wall-eyed Pike, Glass-eyed Pike, -Pike, Pickerel. Correctly, Yellow Pike-Perch. A true Perch. Usual weight from five to ten pounds. Inhabits all the ...
-Pickerel. Esox Reticulatus
Also known as Pike. Inhabits the Great Northern Lakes, the lakes and rivers of the Eastern and Middle States, Ohio and St. Lawrence Rivers, etc. Their ordinary ...
-Flounder. Platessa Plana
Also known as New York Flat-fish and Massachusetts Flounder. Habitat from Maine to Delaware. The color of Flounders is variable. They occur in plenty in bays ...
-Eel. Anguilla Tenuirostris
Strange so lowly a thing should have so extraordinary a scientific name ! This water sarpint is hardly fair game for so dainty and epicurean a hunter as the ...
-Porgee. Pagrus Argyrops
Also known as Big Porgee and Scappaug. Common in bays and inlets, all the way from Massachusetts to Georgia. Most frequent during the summer months. A coarse- ...
-Sheepshead. Sargus Ovis
One of our best flavored fishes. Among the angling fraternity it is deemed a plug, as its capture is laborious and affords no sport. Most are taken in a matter- ...
-King-Fish. Umbrina Alburnus
Also known as Whiting and Barb. Abundant off the coast of Florida and far as North Carolina ; uncommon near New York, and rarely seen off the shores of ...
-Bonito. Pelamys Sarda
Also known as Striped Bonito. The common name is evidently Spanish. Usual weight from six to ten pounds. A recent comer from the South to more northerly shores, ...
-White-Fish. Coregonus Albus
Also known as Lake White-fish/' A northerly species. Taken extensively in Lakes Huron, Michigan, and Superior ; fewer in Lakes Erie and Ontario. They also ...
-Tautog. Tautoga Americana
Also known as New York Tautog and New York Black-fish. They frequent our coast from Massachusetts to Virginia, from May to October. Usual weight from two to ...
-Weak-Fish. Otolithus Regalis
A weak-mouthed fish, that easily tears away from the hook. It is found off our coast all the way from Maine to Florida, and from June to November. Usual weight ...
-Lafayette-Fish. Leiostomus Obliquus
Sometimes called Sea-Chub. First appeared in numbers in 1824, during the last visit of General Lafayette to this country; hence their popular name. They ...
-Cod. Morrhua Americana
Professional Cod-fishing is too well known as an important commercial industry to call for any remark in our short treatise. Their range is from the coast of ...
-Cat-Fish. Pimelodus Catus
Also known as Common Cat-fish. Inhabits all the Great Lakes ; also the inland waters of New England and all the Middle, Southern, and Central-western States, ...
-Butter-Fish. Gunnellus Mucronatus
Also known as Spotted Gunnel and American Butter-fish. Habitat, from Massachusetts to New York. They are taken in New York Bay and Newark Bay. Butter-fish are ...
-Pollack. Merlangus Purpureus
Also known as New York Pollack. By no means common off the coast of New York, but numerous in spring and autumn directly north of Cape Cod. They range far ...
-Smelt. Osmerus Viridescens
Differ from the Smelt of Europe in several particulars. The name refers to their peculiar smell, which resembles the odor of cucumbers, and is strongest when ...
-Muskellunge. Esox Estor
Found in Lakes Huron, Michigan, Erie, and others; also St. Lawrence River, Niagara River, and sundry large streams of Western New York. A bold, ferocious Pike, ...
-Mackinaw Salmon-Trout. Salmo Amethystus
Sometimes called Mackinaw Salmon. A gigantic lake trout, and the largest species of the genus Salmo. The flesh is reddish. Its usual weight runs from twelve to ...
-Brook Trout. Salmo Fontinalis
Inhabit the brooks and small mountain streams of the wild and untravelled parts of our Middle and Eastern States. Some few are found in the northern parts of ...
-Lake Trout. Salmo
Also known as White Trout. Have paler flesh, less flavor, and attain to larger size than Brook Trout. They are found in Lake Ontario, Niagara River, in many ...
-Salmon-Trout. Salmo Confinis
By some this is deemed a mere variety of Brook Trout, improved and developed by sea voyaging. Salmon-Trout are higher flavored and deeper colored than either ...
-Salmon. Salmo Salar
Were it not that some few native streams, far north as Maine, still harbor this royal denizen of the deep, we would have no occasion to include it among our ...
-Herring
Few persons are probably yet aware of the extent to which the little fish Engrau-lus Meletta, from the coast of Sardinia, is being supplanted by the small ...
-Fishing In The Pacific
Our trolling lines, having at the end large hooks wrapped with white rag with a streamer or two floating an inch or two beyond them a device quite as good as ...









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