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Scouting For Rural Boys. A Manual For Leaders | by Boy scouts of America



This manual outlines not only the methods of application of the Scouting program to boys of rural towns, villages and farm areas, but it also presents definitely the organization methods essential and necessary for accomplishing both quality and quantity Scout training in the rural field based upon the successful achievements in rural extension work during the past twelve years, since the National Council developed its Rural Scouting Service and built its program and organization plans to meet the needs of boys living in rural areas.

TitleScouting For Rural Boys. A Manual For Leaders
AuthorBoy scouts of America
PublisherBoy scouts of America
Year1938
Copyright1938, Boy scouts of America
AmazonOutdoor Adventure Manual: Essential Scouting Skills for the Great Outdoors
Scouting For Rural Boys. A Manual For Leaders
-Introductory
We present this manual on Scouting for Rural Boys to both employed and volunteer leaders who are interested in extending the service of Scouting to all boys. This manual outlines not only the metho...
-Foreword
The Scouting and Cubbing Programs have been developed to meet the needs and desires of all boys, regardless of whether they reside in city, town, village, hamlet, or the open country. Surveys which ha...
-Part I. The Opportunity. Chapter I. First Principles Of Rural Scouting
1. Scouting is for both Rural and Urban Boys Whether boys live in the country, town or city, good citizenship and sound character are fundamentals of life. The Scout Movement was developed in the U...
-How To Develop Rural Scouting In A District
1. District arranges to make Boy Fact Survey: (a) To find out how many boys and parents want Scouting. (b) To secure facts about institutions, organizations and agencies for sponsorship. (c) ...
-Do You Know The Differences?
The Rural Troop (How it Differs from a Town or City Troop) 1. Composed of boys from both town and farm. 2. Scoutmaster develops the program to meet both rural and urban interests. 3. Farm boy...
-Chapter II. Rural America-An Opportunity
The farmer feeds the world. America looks to her soil for her food, and for her raw materials for industry and commerce. Rural America also is our major source of human resources as its higher bi...
-The Rural Field
The rural opportunity for Scouting in the United States includes all territory outside of cities, urban centers and the larger towns. The district organization recognizes as its major areas for rural ...
-Town Boys And Agriculture
We should not forget in dealing with the town and even the city boys that the field of agriculture, representing farming as a life's work, and agriculture, as it is related to the professions of agric...
-Chapter III. Reaching Rural Boys And Young Men
While the rural boy has less free time than the usual run of city boys-and while he bears more responsibility and does more work than most of his city friends -yet the rural boy passes through the sam...
-Rural Youth And Free Time
While rural young men, in general, have less free time than do those in the city-yet by no means does one dare assume that free time in rural districts is no hazard. There is relatively less provis...
-Part II. The Organization. Chapter IV. Bird's-Eye View Of The Scout Organization
How shall these different forms of Scouting and Cubbing opportunity be brought to farm and rural village boys in their own neighborhoods? The District is the answer-the District Committees and the Dis...
-Chapter V. How Scout Organization Works
Democracy is especially dear to the rural citizen. His home is his castle. His labors are at the frontiers of civilization-where we ask the soil to produce our foods and raw materials. For that rea...
-Chapter VI. The National Council Plan For Rural Scouting
The main motive behind Rural Scouting efforts is to bring Scouting opportunities to the boys of the small rural places and the open country. This involves two duties: 1. The servicing and helpin...
-Chapter VII. The Council's Rural Program
Over 90% of Scout Councils in the United States have rural territory. About one-fourth of these contain only rural territory. For the first and larger group, the planning for rural territory is par...
-Why Rural Scouting Committees In Area Councils
Why is it important for a local Boy Scout Council to have a Rural Planning Committee, selected and appointed to advise and represent the council in the development of Scouting in the rural areas? Here...
-Council Area Analysis
The question to be answered first is: How many Scout age boys have we- In cities 100,000 or over in the area? ........... In cities 10,000 to 100,000 in the area? ........... In cities 5,000 ...
-Analysis Of Typical Council With Rural Territory
(Wabash Valley Area Council-8 Counties- Terre Haute, Ind.) Each of the 8 counties constitutes one district, with populations ranging from 17,872 to 98,681. The Council has but one city over 10,000,...
-Chapter VIII. Finding Men In The Rural Districts
One very direct way to find men for Scouting in rural districts is to follow through on the Boy-Fact Survey. Here boys are pointing out the best men they know. The very fact that they have been so...
-Chapter IX. Training Courses For Rural Leadership
Training for rural leaders is made available by the Boy Scouts of America in five different types of Training Courses and Conferences. I. Scout Executives' Training As part of the special traini...
-General Background For All Rural Courses
1. The Basic Philosophy of Rural Scouting. a. To bring Scouting (and Cubbing) opportunities to rural boys where they are-no emigration from home needed. This serves the smaller groups which neighbo...
-Plan For 10-Hour, 5-Meeting Course Of Two Hours Each. The First Meeting
THE PRE-OPENING PERIOD, while the group is coming together, affords a chance to have access to various exhibits of Scout or Cub craft work, or various books or forms used in Scouting. Charts on rural ...
-Plan For 10-Hour, 5-Meeting Course Of Two Hours Each. The First Meeting. Continued
Fourth Two-Hour Session PRE-OPENING PERIOD-The exhibits may include the completed Health Cabinets. Safety posters and exhibits would be valuable, also, as would nature collections, types of wood,...
-Chapter X. Making And Using Charts
While we still spend hours on end talking to people, yet research reveals that 7/8 of the materials of our mental life enter via the eye. In planning to advance Rural Scouting, why should we not u...
-Rural Reading Program Region IX-Fine Example. Under Regional Leadership
Placed 34,194 Books and Booklets in one year. Placed Scout Handbooks in Thousands of Schools. Placed Complete Scout Libraries in Many Centers. Placed BOYS' LIFE in many rural schools. Here's A Coun...
-Part III. Doing The Job In The District. Chapter XI. How The Rural District Operates
While planning for the Council's rural program is done by the Council (with all districts represented on the planning body) (perhaps with advice of a Rural Planning Committee of the Council)-yet the a...
-Steps In Development Of Rural District
1. Get accurate knowledge of the Rural Scouting program. One cannot fully present something one does not know or understand. 2. Find out what different racial, vocational, professional and social g...
-Chapter XII. The District Committee
The District Committee is a democratically constituted local group of men representing the interests of all parts of the District. Its aim is to help any and all the boys of the District through carry...
-Chapter XIII. District Commissioner Staff And Service To Rural Groups
The District Commissioner's staff consists of his Assistant District Commissioners, and may include Field Commissioners for special interests such as Cubbing, Senior Scouting, Lone Scouting, Neighborh...
-To What Extent Would He
1. Sincerely try to build the ideals of Scouting into the character of his boys...... 2. Attend Troop meetings regularly ................ 3. Enjoy camping and other outdoor activities......... ...
-Field Commissioners For Rural Scouting
One of the fine things about the Scout Program is its elasticity and adaptability to working in the many kinds of local situations, small neighborhoods and homes of rural areas. As Dr. James E. West h...
-Chapter XIV. Cooperating With Rural Agencies
The Federal Charter of the Boy Scouts of America says: The purpose of this Corporation shall be to promote, through organization, and COOPERATION WITH OTHER AGENCIES, the ability of boys to do thi...
-Suggestions For Joint Program Of Cooperative Service. A. Cooperation-4-H Club Leaders With Scout Executives
1. Merit Badge Counselors, especially for rural subjects. 2. Nature Study Instruction-assist Scout Troops. 3. Directory of workers and units. 4. Expert cooperation of Agricultural Agent for e...
-Chapter XV. Sponsoring Rural Scouts And Cubs
After a recent series of council visits, the Director of Rural Scouting reported on the 8 counties of a mid-western area council. The area had some 50 towns where new Troops may be formed and sponsore...
-Sponsoring Rural Scouts And Cubs. Continued
The Lone Scout Tribe Tribes differ from Troops in that they 1. Are organized with 5 or more Lone Scouts, while Troops run 8 to 32 or more. 2. The Lone Scouts come in one at a time, then feder...
-Chapter XVI. Making Boy-Fact Survey
The Boy-Fact Survey is the best starting point in extending Scouting to rural boys and young men. While of course it may be used with any group of rural young people such as those tributary to a grang...
-Boy-Fact Survey Through Schools
These survey blanks should be used in order to furnish the council and Scout leaders with the following necessary and valuable information: 1. Facts about the boy, parents, and their desires. 2....
-How Start Boy-Fact Survey Through Schools
1. Mimeograph or print a supply of blanks. Survey only one district at a time. 2. Develop one county or district at a time. (Do not let the survey story get old before you do something about it i...
-Public Schools, In Cooperation With Boy Scouts Of America. Boy-Fact Information Blank
To be filled out by boys and men from 11 years of age to 21 (or 8 to 21). Answer all questions thoughtfully, on your own, and as you now know and feel. Personal Facts Date 1. Name ..............
-Chapter XVII. The District Organization And Extension Committee
Two important jobs belong to this District Committee on Organization and Extension: 1. To put into effect the council's program to extend Scouting opportunity and service to all boys of the distric...
-Cultivating Friends Of Boys
There are many ways of awakening interest in Scouting in the rural institution, neighborhood, or home: 1. USE OF SPEAKER at some public meeting at some suitable center or institution. Here invitati...
-Helping People To Start Right
The Organization Committee has a definite responsibility for helping groups or individuals using the Scouting Program to get started right. They encourage leaders to take training courses, to sec...
-Helping People To Start Right. Continued
11. HE SHOULD BE INTERESTED IN HELPING BOYS CARRY OUT THEIR OWN IDEAS AND BE ABLE TO LEAD THEM TO MAKE THEIR OWN DECISIONS, RATHER THAN DOING ALL THE PLANNING HIMSELF, AS WELL AS THE DECIDING In wh...
-Chapter XVIII. The District Leadership Training Committee
The area council's planning and program for leadership training for the council is covered in the Handbooks for Executives and the Standard Local Council Constitution and By-Laws. In this Handbook for...
-Training Policies
Some general policies may well be set up to keep in mind, with all training courses in Scouting: 1. EVERYONE WORKING IN SCOUTING SHOULD RECEIVE TRAINING FOR HIS TASKS. Not only Scoutmasters or Cubm...
-Skeleton Course Session
The Training Course outlines as prepared by the National Educational Service contain very full suggested outlines and schedules and course content for large town and urban Scouting. Hence those items ...
-Chapter XIX. The District Finance Committee
The Finance Committee of the area council is charged with the responsibility of preparing, with an eye to area needs and resources, a council budget for adoption by the Executive Board. It also develo...
-District Finance Responsibility
The Chairman of the District Finance Committee is a member of the Council Finance Committee-a two-way representative of his district. Once the district share of the council goal has been set up, th...
-Some General Considerations. Local Council Needs To Provide
Office, as service station, headquarters, clearing house and planning center. Scout Executive and Office Staff to administer the activities, stimulate extension, conduct the training and give techn...
-Some General Considerations. Local Council Needs To Provide. Continued
The Chairman of this District Initial Gifts Committee will receive the instructions and suggestions for In most districts, these workers will need to have district get togethers both in preparati...
-The Dawn To Dusk Campaign
This plan of one day campaign has proven very successful in rural territory-small towns and open country neighborhoods may do entire job in a single half day or evening. The following steps are recomm...
-Chapter XX. The District Health And Safety Committee
While it is true that the Area Council Health and Safety Committee is responsible for outlining the council's plan, yet the district is where these things happen. The meeting places to be inspected an...
-Getting A Good Chairman
The Scout Executive Magazine (April, 1938) published the following comment by Fred C. Mills on finding the Health and Safety Chairman: Potentially, the Health and Safety Committee should be the ...
-Some Activities Of District H. And S. Committee
1. Studies its own rural conditions. 2. Through its chairman, it participates in building the council plan, in which the district recommendations have been merged. 3. It cooperates with District...
-Application To Rural Life
The District Committee on Health and Safety, in its influence on the training both of leaders and Scouts, needs to emphasize the special kinds of rural hazards that the rural Scout encounters. The ...
-Chapter XXI. The District Advancement Committee At Work In Rural Sections
In accordance with policies and plans prepared by the Area Council Advancement Committee and approved by the Executive Board-it is the business of the District Advancement Committee to see that all th...
-Counselors
In the United States we have a very wide spread of education, specialized skills and hobbies. These are abetted by schools, inexpensive books, radio and by the press of which we have 40% of the world'...
-Lone Scout Advancement
The Lone Scout's Friend and Counselor serves really as the Lone Scout's Scoutmaster, and aids and cooperates with him in his advancement, handling tests and other details the same as do Scoutmasters...
-Farm Subjects For Rural And Urban Boys
While ordinarily we think of the many Merit Badges in rural and farm subjects as being particularly aimed at farm or rural boys because related to the vocation of farming in which the rural boy lives-...
-Chapter XXII. The District Camping And Activities Committee
As Dr. James E. West has stated on many occasions Scouting is camping. Lord Baden-Powell's letters and Christmas cards are usually signed with the wish Good Camping. Studies made of town boys' int...
-General Responsibilities
While the Council Camping and Activities Committee with its district committees of like name are responsible to the council and district for camping matters, it is well to remember that the committee ...
-The Camping Survey
In the rural district the camping survey can be made a part of the Boy-Fact Survey of that district. The council records can answer most of the following questions: 1. What forms of camping were...
-Troop (Tribe Or Patrol) Camping Policy
Camping, by the Boy Scouts of America, is educational as well as recreational. It is something more than billeting a boy with a crowd of other boys with a centrally directed mass program. It is a grou...
-Camping For Rural Boys
Camping for rural boys involves a few special problems. Planting, cultivating and harvest times have to be avoided. Home chores often represent a continuing responsibility-after all, cows must be milk...
-Part IV. Some Special Activities. Chapter XXIII. Budgets For Scouts In Rural Groups
A Scout is Thrifty-He does not wantonly destroy property. He works faithfully, wastes nothing, and makes the best use of his opportunities. He saves his money so that he may pay his own way, be genero...
-The Neighborhood Patrol Budget Plan
In a Neighborhood Patrol where there is no sponsoring committee, the three parents who approve the Patrol Scoutmaster are the ones with whom the Scoutmaster should first talk over the advantages of a ...
-Chapter XXIV. Camping For Rural Boys
In planning camping for rural boys, Councils and District organizations and Committees must recognize the need for dealing with: 1. Rural Troops, with their farm boy membership, as well as boys of ...
-Camping For Rural Boys. Continued
II. Camping For Neighborhood Patrols The planning of camping opportunities for the Scouts of a Neighborhood Patrol should follow quite the same lines used for a rural Troop-for a Neighborhood Patro...
-Camping For Rural Senior Scouts
The camping plans for rural Sea Scouts, Explorer Patrols or Troops, and Rover Crews follow the same formula as outlined for other rural Scout groups. The rural Sea Scout Patrols, Explorer Patrols and ...
-Chapter XXV. Civic Service For Rural Scouts
The rural community has less population per square mile, therefore its relationships are closer. Chances for Civic Services are to be found about every rural home, neighborhood, trading center, rural ...
-List Of Rural Civic Service Projects
Special tree planting-gathering seeds and planting. (These may be historic trees and groves.) Reforestation plantings. Dutch Elm disease control. Japanese Beetle control. Tent Caterpillar Moth erad...
-A Conservation Hike
Scouts in rural sections may have a lot of fun and do a lot of good by running a Tent Caterpillar Hike. Tent Caterpillars originally were found chiefly on wild cherry trees; now they are found attac...
-Chapter XXVI. The Reading Of The Rural Scout
The various survey reports of rural boys and young men reveal reading as one of their desired free time activities and recreations. Other rural studies have indicated that the average and under-ave...
-Some Sources Of Books For Rural Boys
The Federal Department of Agriculture supplies, through its Division of Publications in Washington, D. C, lists of its various free or inexpensively priced publications, of which there are thousands. ...
-Chapter XXVII. Community Events In Rural Areas
There are many public events in rural areas in spite of greater distances, fewer people, crop and stock feeding duties-the rural public events held are of great social importance to all. These may be ...
-The District Circus
The outdoor circus seems to fit the rural district, where suitable large buildings are fewer in number or not available. The two-ring circus is popular with two projects going on at the same time. ...
-District Merit Badge Expositions
The small trade centers, with their circle of farm families who come there to trade, are large enough to carry a District Merit Badge Exposition. The basic idea of this event is a series of booths, ...
-The District Camporee
Large rural councils have found the District Camporee especially successful in bringing activities to the rural boys in the district, as well as in bringing the people of the district into closer unde...
-Chapter XXVIII. Rural Scout Exhibits And Demonstrations
While many farm projects require considerable time for their completion, it is, however, surprising how many of these projects lend themselves to demonstration purposes in connection with exhibits. ...
-Rural Scout Exhibits And Demonstrations. Continued
The garden should be cultivated at least once a week and after every rain. There should always be a dust mulch on the top of the ground to retain the moisture. Several crops are now sprayed for bug...
-Craft Suggestions Live Stock And Poultry
The following plates illustrate the formation, types and breed characteristics of the leading breeds of beef and dairy cattle, sheep, hogs, horses, mules, and poultry. These are presented here as a...
-Special Exhibits And Demonstrations For Fairs
The following exhibits are suggestive of some of many possibilities: 1. RURAL SCOUTING EXHIBIT to include charts, showing the different forms of Rural Scouting-Rural Troops, Neighborhood Patrols, L...
-Scout Street Show
Get permission (in writing) from town authorities for using certain space and areas for a certain period. Then put on various demonstrations, exhibits, stunts, program activities suited to outdoor and...
-Steps To Be Taken
1. Get a written memorandum or a statement from the authorities of town or city authorizing the use of streets and vacant lots, and other desirable spots for exhibits, demonstrations, stunts and progr...
-Boy Scout Anniversary Week Exhibits
The Boy Scout Week program is a wonderful opportunity for all Scouts to prepare interesting exhibits for the purpose of demonstrating to their parents, friends, relatives and neighbors, some of the in...
-Outdoor Demonstration Of Fires
The following outline, suggested by the Hampshire-Franklin, Mass., Council, was taken from a splendid article of practical value which appeared in an issue of the Camping Magazine. Its author is Dr....
-Chapter XXIX. Rural Cubbing
Cubbing is a home and neighborhood-centered program for boys of 9, 10 and 11 years of age. It consists of many active things to do and things to be made in and around the home and its close-up n...
-The Rural Den In A Town Pack
Population may be scattered in such a way that there will be a few farm boys in a town Cub Pack. Such distributions occur in some rural churches, for example. These rural Cubs may be made into one De...
-The Lone Cub
Since rural Cubbing is carried on in and around the rural home, the Lone Cub plan is especially suited to serving the individual boy, or the one boy in a small neighborhood, a boy who is now ready t...
-Chapter XXX. Different Ways To Bring Senior Scouting To Rural Areas
For Senior Scouts in rural territory, as for younger Scouts and Cubs-a variety of ways have been developed to bring opportunities to them in their own homes and neighborhoods without necessitating tha...
-Chapter XXXI. Rural Explorer Scouting
Because of the closeness of the farm home to the farming industry, the explorations of older rural Scouts naturally include items related to the whole range of farm life. Whether the Explorer Sco...
-Special Explorer Projects And Awards
In order to aid and encourage rural Explorer Scouts to explore and pursue their main interests, a series of highly valuable farm explorer projects has been made available. These are in addition to tho...
-Chapter XXXII. Sea Scouting For Farm Areas
There is no reason why rural boys 15 years of age or over should not have the advantages of the Sea Scouting program. Some of the best Sea Scout Ships in the country have been located in the heart of ...
-Chapter XXXIII. The "Lone" Plan For Cubs And Scouts
The word Lone as used in Lone Scouting does not mean alone in the usual sense. It comes nearer to the meaning of the Lone Indian Brave. Similarly the Lone Scout on his own reaches out for Scouti...
-The Lone Scout's First Moves
When the Lone Scout has secured his Friend and Counselor and has registered as a Scout and has the use of his own Scout Handbook, then he is ready to push forward on his own. For advice, he has hi...
-The Lone Scout's First Moves. Continued
The Lone Scout Tribe The individual program of the Lone Scout in a Lone Scout Tribe is like that outlined above. The Lone Scout effects his own achievements himself. He has periodic and rather regu...
-Chapter XXXIV. Rural Crafts
Many boys want to make things with tools and materials. Crafts are even more important and essential to farm boys, because of the daily craft demands upon them on the farm. 1. In the day's work the...
-Rural Craft Demonstrations
Rural leaders of Troops, Tribes and Neighborhood Patrols will do well to train their Scouts in the art of public demonstration. Among the important factors are: 1. ADEQUATE SPACE. This should be la...
-Closing The Demonstration
In a Merit Badge Exposition the demonstration goes on and on, but with a platform demonstration it comes to an end, and then the platform should be cleared swiftly to make way for the next program ite...
-Some Main Objects Of Scout Craft Work
1. Personal development through self-expression and initiative. 2. Vocational exploration, giving intelligent guidance to explore, find and train in a craft line or trade on a try-out basis. 3...
-Natural Shelters
The Scout can locate certain fence corners, brush thickets, brush piles, old shocks of corn, which may serve as natural shelters for quail, pheasants and other game birds, varying with the section. To...
-Natural Shelters. Continued
Tools The average farm or home work shop usually contains enough tools for this work. A Scout knife, saw, axe or hatchet, chisels, jackplane, jigsaw or coping saw and some clamps. Hammer and nails,...
-Rope Making Machine
A few pieces of boards, a brace and bit to bore holes about the size of the wire. (If you have no small bit a nail can be driven through and pulled out.) The hooks can be made from coat hanger or ...
-Boy's Own Room
Leaders of rural boys should be conscious of the importance of a boy having a room of his own. Here in the presence of his own pennants, Scouting pictures, books, interests, collections, art pieces, c...
-Chapter XXXV. Life Work Explorations
The rural Scout is so close to the life work of farming that for him to understand and know of all the latest and most improved practices is important. Farm boys have a fine opportunity to get what...
-What Kind Of A Life Work?
To help the Scout make a wise answer to this question of What Life Work? is to help him stabilize his life and give it direction, interest, enthusiasm and force. A choice implies a comparison of ...
-General Farming
The Farm-best home of the family-main source of national wealth-foundation of civilized society-the national providence. -Charles W. Eliot. (On Union Station, Washington, D. C.) General Scope ...
-General Farming. Continued
Looking Ahead Modern machinery has multiplied the acreage one man can handle by amounts varying from 15 to 25 times! That would imply the threat of glutted markets due to increased acreages and yie...
-Chapter XXXVI. Rural-Urban Relationships
The quarter turn of the 20th Century found town and country understanding one another, and coming more closely together in cooperation. Careful thinkers had long recognized that town and country inter...
-Part V. Looking Ahead. Chapter XXXVII. The Farm And The Farm Family
Looking ahead to the future, as it involves agriculture and the farm family, one is impressed with several trends: 1. The increase of farm home comforts, conveniences, safety and sanitary provision...
-The Farm Family
The farm family sets an educational ideal for the nation as a whole, as the atmosphere of the rural home surrounded with the quiet eternal realities of growing things-no bluff, but dependable things- ...
-Chapter XXXVIII. Meeting America's Need
Generation after generation, America's continuing need is, as Dr. James E. West has phrased it, for men of character trained for citizenship. The Church, the School and the Home, aided by multipl...
-Appendix B. Memorandum Of Understanding Between Boy Scouts Of America And The Agricultural Extension Service Of Iowa State College
In view of the fact that the Boy Scout Movement proposes to expand its work in the rural field, and that the development of this Movement will, of necessity, deal with the rural leaders and farm boys ...
-Appendix C
U. S. Department of Agriculture Washington, D. C. The following list of Bureaus and Services of the Federal Government in Agriculture, gives some idea of the wide scope of its usefulness. The Of...
-Appendix D. Some Suggestions For Tribe Meetings
I- While most Troops meet weekly, the Lone Scout Tribes meet as distance or seasons permit-usually once a month. II- If a Tribe has several Patrols (organized in neighborhoods or along a school bus...









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