Auckland. I. A province of New Zealand, occupying the north and centre of North island; area, about 30,000 sq. m.; pop. in 1871, i 62,335, besides 16,000 Maoris. II. A city, cap-ital of the preceding province and formerly of New Zealand, on the S. shore of Waitemafa harbor, in lat. 36° 51' S., lon. 174° 45' E.; pop. in 1871,12,937; with suburbs, 18,000, chiefly English, Irish, Scotch, and Germans. The town was founded in 1840, and became a borough in 1851. It includes an area of 16 by 7 m., is surrounded by four villages for pensioned soldiers, and divided into 14 wards, 11 of which are outside of the town. The streets are well laid out. There are several churches, including an English cathedral. St. John's college is 4 m. from the town. The number of registered vessels is upward of 100. Gold was first discovered near Auckland in 1852, but the mines are not as productive as those in other parts of New Zealand. Coal fields and petroleum were found in 1859 and 18G7. The chief exports are gold, wool, and gum; the imports are manufactured goods, tea, tobacco, sugar, wine, spirits, and beer.

Emigration to Auckland is checked by the insurrection of the Maoris, who in November, 1871, committed several murders in the province, including that of Bishop Patterson. The seat of the colonial government has within a few years been removed to Wellington.

Auckland, New Zealand.

Auckland, New Zealand.