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The American Cyclopaedia Vol8 | by George Ripley And Charles A. Dana



The American Cyclopaedia - Popular Dictionary Of General Knowledge. Vol8

TitleThe American Cyclopaedia
AuthorGeorge Ripley And Charles A. Dana
PublisherD. Appleton And Company
Year1873
Copyright1873, D. Appleton And Company
AmazonThe New American Cyclopædia. 16 volumes complete.

The American Cyclopædia

Edited By George Ripley And Charles A. Dana.

Other spellings could be: Cyclopaedia, Cyclopedia, Encyclopædia, Encyclopaedia, Encyclopedia

-Michoacan
Michoacan, Or Mcclioacan, a maritime state of Mexico, bounded N. by Jalisco, Guanajuato, and Queretaro, E. by Mexico, S. by Guerrero, S. W. by the Pacific, and W. by Colima and Jalisco; area, 21,609 s...
-Micmacs
Micmacs, the most easterly branch of the Algonquin family of Indians, spread over northern New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Cape Breton, Newfoundland, Prince Edward Island, and Gasp6. They were called by t...
-Micrometer
Micrometer (Gr. , small, and measure), an instrument applied to telescopes and microscopes for measuring minute spaces and objects. - Telescope Micrometers. A paper by Mr. Townley in the Philosop...
-Micronesia And Melanesia
Micronesia And Melanesia (Gr. small, black, and island), terms derived from the size and complexion of the inhabitants, and applied by some geographers to arbitrary divisions of the islands ...
-Microscope
Microscope (Gr. , small, and to see), an optical instrument for the examination of minute objects. Microscopes are of two kinds, simple and compound. With the former, the object is viewed directl...
-Midas
Midas, the name of several mythical kings of Phrygia. Rawlinson remarks in a note to Herodotus: In the royal house of Phrygia, the names Midas and Gordias seem to have alternated perpetually, as in ...
-Middlesex
I. A N. E. County Of Massachusetts A N. E. County Of Massachusetts, bordering on New Hampshire, bounded S. E. by the Charles river and drained by the Merrimack, Nashua, and Concord rivers, and other ...
-Middleton
Middleton, the name of a family noted in the history of South Carolina. I. Edward Edward, its founder, was a native of Twickenham, England, where he inherited a large property. He removed to South C...
-Middletown
Middletown, a city, port of entry, and one of the shire towns of Middlesex co., Connecticut, on the right bank of the Connecticut river, 30 in. above its mouth, 24 m. N. E. of New Haven, and 15 m. S. ...
-Midianites
Midianites, a nomad or half-nomad people of northern Arabia, who in the time of the early history of the Hebrews dwelt in the vicinity of the Arabian gulf and Dead sea, especially between Mt. Sinai an...
-Midich
Midich (Ger. Müncheri), the capital of Bavaria and of the district of Upper Bavaria, on the Isar, in the midst of an extensive plain, 1,700 ft. above the level of the sea, in lat. 48 9' N., Ion. ...
-Midshipman
Midshipman, the lowest grade of officers in the line of promotion in the naval service. The number of midshipmen in the United States navy in 1874 was about 100, and no one can be appointed unless he ...
-Mieris
I. Frans Frans, the elder, a Dutch painter, born in 1635, died in Leyden in 1681. He was a pupil of Gerard Douw, and painted genre pictures and occasionally portraits, all remarkable for delicacy of ...
-Migata
Migata, a seaport on the W. coast of the main island of Japan, in the province of Echigo, on the S. bank of the Shinano river, opposite Sado island, capital of the Teen or prefecture of the same name;...
-Mignel De Molinos
Mignel De Molinos, a Spanish mystic, born in the diocese of Saragossa in 1627, died in Rome Dec. 29. 1696. He studied at Pamplona and Coimbra, was ordained priest, and in 1669 settled at Rome. In 1075...
-Mignonette
Mignonette (Fr. mignonnette, diminutive of rnignonne, darling), the common name for reseda odorata, a very popular garden annual. Though we derive our garden name as above indicated, the French use re...
-Miguel De Cervantes Saavedra
Miguel De Cervantes Saavedra, a Spanish author, born at Alcala de Henares, Oct. 9, 1547, died April 23, 1616. His father was descended from an ancient Galician family, and his mother was a gentlewoman...
-Mihaly Horvath
Mihaly Horvath, a Hungarian historian, born at Szentes, Oct. 20, 1809. He was ordained as priest in 1830, and became in 1844 professor of the Hungarian language and literature in the Theresianum at Vi...
-Mikhail Bakunin
Mikhail Bakunin, a Russian revolutionist, born at Torzhok, Tver, in 1814. He belongs to an old family, left the military service for the study of philosophy, and became conspicuous by his affiliations...
-Mikhail Kutuzoff
Mikhail Kutuzoff, prince of Smolensk, a Russian general, born in 1745, died in Bun-zlau, Prussian Silesia, April 28, 1813. He commenced his military career at the age of 16, and distinguished himself ...
-Mikhail Lermontoff
Mikhail Lermontoff, a Russian poet, born in October, 1814, killed in a duel in the Caucasus in July, 1841. He was of noble birth, and in early manhood became an officer of the imperial guards. The dea...
-Miklos Josika
Miklos Josika, baron, a Hungarian novelist, born in Torda, Transylvania, Sept. 28, 1796, died in Dresden, Feb. 27, 1865. He studied law, and early entered the Austrian army, which he left in 1818 with...
-Milan
Milan (Ital. Milano; Ger. Ma Hand). I. A Province Of Italy A Province Of Italy, in Lombar-dy, bordering on Como, Bergamo, Cremona, Pia-cenza, Pavia, and Nova-ra; area, 1,155 sq. m.; pop. in 1872, 1,...
-Milazzo, Or Melazzo
Milazzo, Or Melazzo (anc. Myla:), a seaport town of Sicily, on the N. coast, in the province and 18 in. W. of the city of Messina; pop. about T.oiio. It is built on a promontory which forms a spacious...
-Mildew
Mildew (Ang Sax. mildedw; Ger. Mehl-thau, meal dew), a name applied to various minute fungi, especially by agriculturists and horticulturist to those which are found upon and are injurious to their cr...
-Mile
Mile (Lat. mille passuum, 1,000 paces of 5 ft. each), a measure of length or distance. According to the estimates of the length of the Roman foot, the ancient mile must have been 1,614 or 1,618 Englis...
-Miles Coverdale
Miles Coverdale, an English divine, born in Yorkshire in 1487, died in February, 1568. He was educated in the house of the Augustine friars at Cambridge, ordained a priest in 1514, and was among the f...
-Miles Standish
Miles Standish, a soldier of New England, born in Lancashire, England, about 1584, died in Duxbury, Mass., Oct. 3, 1656. He had served in the Netherlands, and on coming to Plymouth with the first comp...
-Miletus
Miletus, an ancient city of Asia Minor, situated in the northern part of Caria, but politically belonging to the Ionian confederacy. It stood at the northern extremity of a promontory formed by the Gr...
-Milford Haven
Milford Haven, a harbor of Pembrokeshire, Wales, the deepest, safest, and most commodious in Great Britain, formed by an inlet of St. George's channel, N. W. of the entrance to Bristol channel. Its op...
-Military Bridge
The art of constructing temporary bridges for the passage of troops across large rivers and narrow arms of the sea, was well known to the ancients. Darius passed the Bosporus and Danube, and Xerxes th...
-Military Frontier
Military Frontier (Ger. Militargrenze; Hung. Hatdror-videF), a region, and formerly a political division, of the Austro-Hungarian monarchy, between lat. 44 and 47 N., and Ion. 14 and 23...
-Military Schools
Military Schools, institutions in which soldiers are instructed or youths educated for the army. Of the former class, the soldier schools of Prussia, established in every regiment or battalion, in ...
-Militia (Lat. Miles A Soldier)
Militia (Lat. Miles A Soldier), a body of armed citizens trained to military duty, who may be called out in certain cases, but may not be kept on service, like standing armies, in time of peace. It di...
-Milk
Milk, the liquid secreted by the mammary glands of female mammals. Its color is generally yellowish white, but sometimes bluish white, and it is quite opaque. Its specific gravity, according to Schere...
-Milk Leg, Or Phlegmasia Dolens
Milk Leg, Or Phlegmasia Dolens, an obstruction of the veins and lymphatics, causing a painful, non-cedematous swelling in one or both lower extremities. It is most common in women after parturition, b...
-Milkweed
Milkweed, the popular name for plants of the genus Asclepias (named in honor of Aescu-lapius), which includes about 40 species, half of which are North American and the remainder natives of Central an...
-Mill
I. James James, a British philosopher, born in Logie Pert, near Montrose, Forfarshire, April 6, 1773, died in Kensington, June 23, 1836. He was educated at the grammar school of Montrose and the univ...
-Millard Parker
Millard Parker, an American surgeon, born in Hillsboro, N. H., Sept. 2, 1800. He is the sixth in descent from one of five brothers who came from England in 1644 and settled at Chelmsford, Mass., to wh...
-Millennium
Millennium (Lat. mille, 1,000, and annus, a year), a period of 1,000 years. In theology this term generally designates the doctrine of a return of Jesus Christ in person before the end of the world, o...
-Millepore (Millepora Linn)
Millepore (Millepora Linn), a genus of hydroid medusae The animals live in communities, which take on various arborescent and incrusting shapes; they deposit much carbonate of lime in their tissues, s...
-Miller
I. A S. W. County Of Georgia A S. W. County Of Georgia, intersected by Spring creek, a branch of Flint river; area, about 250 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 3,091, of whom 956 were colored. The surface is lev...
-Millet
Millet, a name given to grasses of several distinct species and genera; it is from the Italian miglietto, diminutive of miglio, from the Latin milium, which in turn is supposed to be from mille, a tho...
-Millstone
Millstone, a hard and rough stone in one or many pieces, formed into cylindrical shape, from 3 to 7 ft. in diameter, and 8 to 18 in. thick, used together with another of the same size and shape for gr...
-Millstone Grit
Millstone Grit, a geological formation, principally a conglomerate, composed of sili-cious sand and small pebbles; it is also called grit rock and grindstone grit. It is named from the frequent use to...
-Milne-Edwards
Milne-Edwards (1855) divides the third branch, malacozoaria or mollusca, into the two sub-branches: l,mollusks proper, with the classes of cephalopods. pteropods, gasteropods, and acephala; and 2, mol...
-Milner
I. Joseph Joseph, an English historian, born near Leeds, Jan. 2,1744, died in Hull, Nov. 15, 1797. He graduated at Cambridge in 1766, and after taking orders became head master of the grammar school ...
-Miltiades
Miltiades, an Athenian statesman, who nourished at the beginning of the 5th century B. C. He was of a noble family, son of Ci-mon, and nephew of the elder Miltiadcs, who was prominent in Athonsin the ...
-Milton
Milton, a N. county of Georgia, bounded S. E. by the Chattahoochee river, and watered by several streams; area, about 150 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 4,284, of whom 466 were colored. The surface is broken a...
-Milutin, Or Milyntin, Nikolai Alexeyevitch
Milutin, Or Milyntin, Nikolai Alexeyevitch, a Russian statesman, born April 29, 1818, died in Moscow, Feb. 7, 1872. Being born on the same day with the grand duke Alexander, he was educated at the exp...
-Milwaukee (2)
Milwaukee, the chief city and port of entry of Wisconsin, capital of Milwaukee co., on the W. shore of Lake Michigan, in lat. 43 2' N., Ion. 87 54' W., 75 m. E. of Madison, and 85 m. N. by W...
-Milxdt
I. Theodor Theodor, a German author, born in Potsdam, Sept. 19, 1808, died in Berlin, May 30, 1861. He was educated in Berlin and Leipsic, and became prominent among the young Germany school of write...
-Mimosa
Mimosa (Gr. a mimic, as some of the plants imitate the movements of animals), a genus of legvminpsce which is so unlike in structure to the majority of the order as to serve as a type of a suborder...
-Minas Geraes
Minas Geraes, an inland province of Brazil, bounded N. by Bahia, E. by Bahia, Espirito Santo, and Rio de Janeiro, S. by Rio de Janeiro and Sao Paulo, and \V. by Govaz; area, about 230.000 sq. m.; pop....
-Mincio (Anc. Mincius)
Mincio (Anc. Mincius), a river of N. Italy, which runs, under the name of Sarca, from the S. extremity of Tyrol into the lake of Garda, at Riva, issues from it at Peschiera, where it takes the name of...
-Minden
Minden, a fortified town of Westphalia, Prussia, capital of a district of the same name, on the left bank of the Weser, 60 m. E. N. E. of Miinster; pop. in 1871, 16,593. It is one of the oldest towns ...
-Mine
Mine, an excavation made in the earth for the extraction of minerals. When the material to be extracted is a rock of any kind, the excavation is known as a quarry. We find very little in classic liter...
-Mineral Deposits
The useful minerals occur in a variety of forms and conditions, and the deposits which are composed of or include them may be classified into superficial, stratified, and unstratified deposits. I. Su...
-Mineral Springs
Mineral Springs, those which are impregnated with minerals to such a degree as to possess medicinal properties. They differ from ordinary springs by the larger volume of gases, especially carbonic aci...
-Mineralogy
Mineralogy, the science which treats of the composition, structure, formation, and classification of minerals. The term therefore covers both descriptive mineralogy and mineral-ology, which is the stu...
-Minerva
Minerva, called by the Greeks Athena, Pallas, or Pallas Athene, in mythology, one of the principal Olympian divinities. She was one of the most ancient religious conceptions of the Greeks. Jupiter, af...
-Mingrelia
Mingrelia, a district of Asiatic Russia, in the lieutenancy of the Caucasus, forming part of the government of Kutais, bordering on the Circassian districts, Imerethia, Guria, the Blaek sea, and Abkha...
-Minho, Or Entre Douro E Minho
Minho, Or Entre Douro E Minho, the northernmost province of Portugal, bounded N. by the Spanish province of Pontevedra, from which it is separated by the Minho, N. E. by that of Orense, E. by the Port...
-Miniature Palnting
Miniature Palnting, a species of painting on a small scale, executed with water colors on vellum, prepared paper, or ivory, or in enamel. The word originated from the ancient practice of writing the i...
-Mink
Mink, a small, fur-bearing, carnivorous mammal, found in the northern parts of America, Europe, and Asia, belonging to the genus puto-rius (Cuv.), in which are included the ermine and common weasels, ...
-Minneapolis
Minneapolis, a city and the county seat of Hennepin co., Minnesota, on both sides of the Mississippi river, here spanned by four bridges, at the falls of St. Anthony, 14 m. above St. Paul by the cours...
-Minnesota
Minnesota, one of the northwestern states of the American Union, the 19th admitted, and the 2sth in rank according to population, situated between hit. 43 30' and 49 24' N., and Ion. 89 39' ...
-Minnetarees
Minnetarees, a tribe of Indians on the upper Missouri, who are called by the Canadians Gros Ventres of the Missouri, but by themselves Hidatsa. They were originally part of the Crow nation, but separa...
-Minnow
Minnow, the common name of many small cyprinodont fishes, of the genera fundulus (Lacep.) and hydrargyra (Lacep.). In fundulus the upper surface of the head is flattened; fine card-like teeth upon the...
-Minos
Minos, in Greek mythology and legends, a Cretan hero and lawgiver. According to Homer, he was the son of Jupiter by Europa, brother of Rhadamanthus, and the father of Deucalion and Ariadne. The logogr...
-Mino Bird (Gracula Religiosa Linn)
Mino Bird (Gracula Religiosa Linn), a coni-rostral bird of the starling family and subfamily graculinm. In this genus the bill is as long as the head, broad at the base and strong, with the culmen cur...
-Minorca (Span. Menorca; Anc. Balearis Minor)
Minorca (Span. Menorca; Anc. Balearis Minor), the second in size of the Balearic islands, lying 24 m. E. N. E. of Majorca, about 125 m. S. E. of Barcelona, between lat. 39 47' and 40 5; N., ...
-Minsk
I. A S. W. Government Of European Russia A S. W. Government Of European Russia, bordering on Vitebsk. Mohilev, Tchcr-nigov, Kiev. Volhynia, Grodno, and Wilna; area, 35,295 sq. m.; pop. in 1867, 1,135...
-Minster
Minster (anc. Mumhan), the largest and southernmost of the four provinces of Ireland, bounded N. by Connaught, N. E. by Leinster, and on other sides by the Atlantic, and comprised between lat. 51...
-Minstrels
Minstrels (Lat. minstrellus, diminutive of minister; Fr. menestrel), a class of men in the middle ages who amused their patrons by the arts of poetry and music, singing to the harp their own verses, o...
-Mint
Mint, the name of plants of the genus mentlia (from Mintha, a nymph changed into this plant), of the order labiatce, which is distinguished from related genera by an almost regular corolla and four fe...
-Mint (2)
Mint (Ang.-Sax. mynet, from mynetian, to mark), a place whery money is coined by a government. The early methods of coining money were exceedingly imperfect. The metal, brought to the required standar...
-Minuet (Fr. Mennet)
Minuet (Fr. Mennet), a graceful and stately dance, which had a celebrity in the last century equal to that at present enjoyed by the quadrille, the waltz, and the polka, but which is now rarely practi...
-Minuet, Or Miuuits
Minuet, Or Miuuits (properly Minnewit), Peter, an American colonial governor, born in Wesel, Germany, in the latter part of the 16th century, died near Fort Christiana, Delaware, in 1641. He was a Pro...
-Minutoli
I. Heinrich Menu Von, Baron Baron Heinrich Menu Von, a German archaeologist, born in Geneva, May 12, 1772. died near Lausanne, Sept. 10, 1840. He entered the Prussian army at an early age, was wounde...
-Miocene
Miocene, in geology, the intermediate of the three epochs of the tertiary or mammalian age, having the eocene below and the pliocene above. The term is derived from Gr. less, and recent, from le...
-Miracle
Miracle (Lat. miraculum, from mirari, to wonder), in the stricter usage of the word, a work of divine power, interrupting (or violating) the ordinary course of nature, and directly designed, to attest...
-Miracles And Moralities
Miracles And Moralities, religious and allegories 1 plays, which constituted the drama of the middle ages. They were often called miracle plays and moral plays, and in later times have'more frequently...
-Mirage
Mirage (Fr., from Lat. mirari, to wonder), an appearance of distant objects in the air, as if standing in the sky, or reflected from the surface of water. It is produced by refraction in strata of dif...
-Miramon. Miguel
Miramon. Miguel, a Mexican soldier, born in the city of Mexico, Sept. 29, 1832, shot at Queretaro. June 19, 1867. He was of French descent. In 1846 he entered the military academy at Chapultepec, and ...
-Mirblehead
Mirblehead, a town and port of entry of Essex co., Massachusetts, at the terminus of a branch of the Eastern railroad, 12 m. N. E. of Boston; pop. in 1870, 7,703. It is built upon a peninsula project...
-Mirror
Mirror (Fr. miroir, from Lat. mirari, to wonder, admire), a looking glass or speculum; any bright surface that reflects the rays of light falling upon it. The surface of smooth water is a natural mirr...
-Miss
Miss (Lat. missa, from mittere, to dismiss), in the Roman Catholic church, the form of celebrating the Lord's supper. When first introduced, the term denoted the dismissal of the catechumens and penit...
-Misdemeanor
Offences less than treason are, in law, divided into felonies (see Felony) and misdemeanors. Any crime less than a felony is a misdemeanor. Statutes sometimes declare that the offences which they cont...
-Mishnah, Or Mishna
Mishnah, Or Mishna (late Heb., study), the earlier part or text of the Talmud, forming a compendium of decisions, based on oral traditions, respecting the laws and religious rites of the Jews, and fir...
-Misic
Misic (Gr., a muse), an agreeable combination and arrangement of sounds, and the art of so combining and arranging sounds. It is indispensable to have some knowledge of the nature of sounds before we ...
-Missal (Lat. Missale)
Missal (Lat. Missale), the mass book of the Roman Catholic church, containing the daily eucharistic service for the whole year. During the first eight centuries the parts to be recited or sung by the ...
-Mississagas
Mississagas, an Algonquin tribe originally found, in the middle of the 17th century, at the mouth of a river of the same name north of Lake Huron. After the destruction of the Hurons they fled inland,...
-Mississippi
Mississippi, one of the S. \Y. states of the American Union, and the seventh admitted under the federal constitution, situated between lat. 30 13' and 35 N,nd Ion. 88 7' and 91 41' W.: extre...
-Mississippi River
Mississippi River (Indian, Mclie Sepe, as spelled by some old writers, and translated the Great River and the Great Father of Waters ), the principal river of North America, and, in connection wit...
-Missoiris, Or Missonriax
Missoiris, Or Missonriax, a tribe of Indians belonging to the Dakota family, and calling themselves Nudarcha, Missouri being the name given them by the Illinois. Marquette in 1673 first heard of them ...
-Missolonghi, Or Mcsolonghi
Missolonghi, Or Mcsolonghi, a town of Greece, capital of the united nomarchy of Acarnania and .Ktolia. 24 m. W. of Lepanto, on the N. side of the gulf of Patras; pop. about 6,000. It stands in a level...
-Missouri
Missouri, a central state of the American Union, and the 11th admitted under the federal constitution, situated between lat. 36 and 40 30' N., and Ion. 89 2' and 95 42' W.; length ...
-Missouri River
Missouri River (i. e., Mud river), the principal tributary of the Mississippi. It properly forms one stream with that river, being much greater in length and volume than the other branch which bears t...
-Mistake
It is a fundamental principle of law that no man shall avail himself, either to establish or resist a claim, of his mistake or ignorance of law. So also in criminal law it is an ancient maxim: Ignoran...
-Mistletoe
Mistletoe (Anglo-Saxon mistiltan, from mistl, different, and tan, twig, as the plant is unlike the tree upon which it grows), a parasitic evergreen shrub of the family loranthacece. The true European ...
-Mitau, Or Mittau
Mitau, Or Mittau (Russ. Mitavo; Lettish, Yelgava), a town of Russia, capital of Courland, situated in a low marshy district on the Aa, 25 m. S. W. of Riga; pop. in 1867, 23,-100, chiefly Germans, and ...
-Mitchell
I. A N. W. County Of North Carolina A N. W. County Of North Carolina, bordering on Tennessee, bounded S. W. by the Nolichucky river; area, about 530 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 4,705, of whom 213 were colo...
-Mite
Mite, a name applied to many very small articulated animals, of the arachnoid order and suborder acarina, including the ticks, itch insects, and other parasites, and the minute acari. The abdomen is u...
-Mithridates, Or Mithradates
Mithridates, Or Mithradates, a king of Pon-tus, the sixth of the name, surnamed Eupator and the Great, born about 132 B. C, died in 63. He ascended the throne in 120. He subdued the barbarians between...
-Mitre
Mitre (Gr. ), an ornament worn upon the head by certain ecclesiastics of the Roman Catholic and Greek churches, consisting of a stiff cap rising in two points, one before and the other behind, and h...
-Mittimus
Mittimus, in law, the precept which is addressed by competent judicial authority to a sheriff, constable, or other officer, and to a jailer or keeper of a prison, commanding the one to take and delive...
-Mittoo
Mittoo, a country of central Africa, between the Roah and Rohl rivers, and between lat. 5 and 6 N., bounded N. by the territory of the Dinka and S. by that of the ISTyam-nyam. The most north...
-Mixta
Mixta, the chief of the three holy cities of the Mohammedans, capital of the province of Hedjaz, Arabia, 65 m. E. of Jiddah, its port on the Red sea, and 250 m. S. of Medina, in hit. 21 30' N. an...
-Mixtecas
Mixtecas, a nation of Indians in Mexico, who emigrated at an early period from the north, under chiefs who were said to have sprung from two trees. They displaced the Ohuchones or Chochos, and occupie...
-Mkolaus Lndwig Zenzemmirf
Mkolaus Lndwig Zenzemmirf, count, a bishop of the Moravians, born in Dresden, May 26, 1700, died at Herrnhut, May 9, 1760. His father, a Saxon minister of state, died when the son was very young, and ...
-Mle
Mle (Gr. Nes; Lat. Nilus; Arab. En-Nil), the principal river of Africa, and one of the largest and most famous rivers of the world. The name is of Semitic origin, and is applied to rivers that periodi...
-Mlkado
Mlkado, a term of doubtful etymology, used to designate the emperor of Japan. The word does not occur in the most ancient Japanese books, but is the one, out of many names given to the emperor, which ...
-Mnemonics
Mnemonics (Gr. memory), the art of rendering artificial aid to the memory by associating in the mind things difficult to remember with those which are easy of recollection, so that the former may be...
-Mnzio Clementi
Mnzio Clementi, an Italian pianist and composer, born in Rome in 1752, died at Evesham England, March 10, 1832. His father was a silversmith, and the son evinced at a very early age a passion for musi...
-Moab
Moab, the ancient name of a region on the E. shore of the Dead sea and the E. bank of the Jordan, about 50 m. long by 20 broad. It is designated in Scripture as the land of Moab. The plains are well w...
-Moawiyah
I. The founder of the dynasty of the Ommiyade caliphs, born in Mecca about 610, died in Damascus in the spring of 080. He was the son of Abu Sofian, one of the chiefs at Mecca, and the great-grandson ...
-Mobile
Mobile, the name of a river and bay in the southern part of Alabama, derived from that of a tribe of Indians (the Mauvilians or Mo-bilians) who inhabited the adjacent country at the time of its first ...
-Mobile (2)
Mobile, a port of entry and the capital of Mobile co, Alabama, the largest city and only seaport of the state, on the W. side of Mobile river, immediately above its entrance into the bay of the same n...
-Mobile Point
Mobile Point, the apex of a long, low, narrow, sandy peninsula between the gulf of Mexico on the south and Bon Secours bay and Navy cove on the north. The point is the eastern limit of the entrance in...
-Mobius
I. Angnst Ferdinand Angnst Ferdinand, a German mathematician, born at Schwlpforta, near Naumburg, Nov. 17. 1790, died in Leipsic, Sept. 20, 1868. He graduated at the university of Leipsic in 1815, an...
-Mocha, Or Mokha
Mocha, Or Mokha, a seaport of Arabia, formerly the capital of the province of Yemen, on the Bed sea, at the head of a little bay near the strait of Bab-el-Mandeb, 130 m. N. W. of Aden; pop. about 7,00...
-Mocking Bird
Mocking Bird, an American passerine bird, of the subfamily mimince, and genus mimvs (Boie). The subfamily includes the catbird, brown thrush, and nearly 20 other mockers, arranged by Gray under the si...
-Modem
I. A Former Duchy Of Northern Italy A Former Duchy Of Northern Italy, bordering on Mantua, Ferrara, Bologna, Lucca, Genoa, Parma, and the Mediterranean; area, about 2,300 sq. m. It comprised Modena p...
-Modocs
Modocs, a tribe of American Indians, originally part of the Klamath nation, but in recent times hostile to them. The name Modoc was given to them by the Shasteecas, and means enemies. Their original t...
-Moeris
Moeris, a lake of Egypt, near the ancient Crocodilopolis, now Medinet-el-Fayoom. Herodotus says: Wonderful as is the labyrinth, the work called the lake of Mceris, which is close by the labyrinth, is...
-Mogadore, Or Suirali
Mogadore, Or Suirali, a fortified seaport town of Morocco, on the Atlantic, 130 m. W. by S. of the city of Morocco; pop.-about 20,000, many of whom are Jews. The town stands on an eminence, opposite a...
-Mogila, Or Mogilas, Peter
Mogila, Or Mogilas, Peter, a Kussian author, born in Moldavia about 1597, died Dec. 31, 1046. He studied at several of the European high schools, but stayed longest at the university of Paris. He serv...
-Mogul Emperor Zahir Cd-Din Mohammed Baber
Mogul Emperor Zahir Cd-Din Mohammed Baber, born in 1482 or 1483, died in December, 1530. He was a descendant of Tamerlane, his father being sultan of Khokan, a Tartar kingdom on the Jaxartes. On his f...
-Mohacs
Mohacs, a town of S. Hungary, in the county of Baranya, on the W. arm of the Danube, 110 m. S. by W. of Pesth; pop. in 1870, 12,140. It is an episcopal see, and contains the bishop's palace, a Roman C...
-Mohammed II
Mohammed II, a Turkish sultan, .surnamed the Great and the Victorious, born in Adri-anople in 1430, died near Scutari in Asia Minor in May, 1481. He was the eldest son of Amurath II. by a Christian pr...
-Mohammed IV
Mohammed IV, a Turkish sultan, born in 1042, died about the close of 1692. In 1048 he succceded his father Ibrahim L, who had been deposed and strangled by the janizaries. Mohammed Kuprili or Kuperli,...
-Mohammed Shems Ed-Din Hafiz
Mohammed Shems Ed-Din Hafiz, a Persian poet, born in Shiraz near the beginning of the 14th century, died about 1300. He early devoted himself to Mohammedan jurisprudence and theology, in which he beca...
-Mohammed, Or Mahomet
Mohammed, Or Mahomet (Arab., the Praised, or, according to E. Deutsch and Sprenger, the Desired or Promised, in allusion to Ilaggai ii. 7), the founder of the Mussulman religion, born in Mecca, accord...
-Mohammedanism
Mohammedanism, the name commonly given in Christian countries to the religion established by Mohammed. The Mohammedans do not themselves acknowledge the name. They call their religion Islam, which mea...
-Mohave
Mohave, the N. W. county of Arizona, bounded N by Utah and W by California find Nevada, from which it is separated for the greater part by the Colorado river- arc. about 10.500 sq.m.; pop. in 1870,179...
-Mohegans, Or Mohicans
Mohegans, Or Mohicans, an Algonquin tribe, found by the Dutch holding both sides of the Hudson river for about 75 m. They received the Dutch amicably, and gave them lands on which they erected Fort Or...
-Mohilev, Or Moghilcv
I. A W. Government Of European Russia A W. Government Of European Russia, bordering on Vitebsk, Smolensk, Orel, Tchernigov, and Minsk; area, 18,545 sq. m.; pop. in 1867, 908,85s. The surface is gener...
-Mohl
I. Lingo Von Lingo Von, a German botanist, born in Stuttgart, April 8, 1805, died in Tubingen, April 1, 1872. He studied medicine and the natural sciences at the university of Tubingen, and in 1835 b...
-Molasses (Fr. Melasse)
Molasses (Fr. Melasse), the sirup which remains in the manufacture of brown sugar, after separating from the juice all the saccharine matter that can be made to crystallize to advantage; also the insp...
-Moldavia
Moldavia (Ger. Moldau; Turk. Bogdaii), a country of Europe belonging to the Turkish empire, and now together with Wallaehia forming the vassal state of Roumania. It is situated between lat. 45 an...
-Mole
Mole, the name of many insectivorous mammals of the family talpidm, embracing several genera which agree in having a stout, thick, clumsy body, without visible neck, no external ears, minute auditory ...
-Mole Cricket
Mole Cricket, a jumping orthopterous insect, of the genus gryllotalpa (Latr.), meaning cricket mole. The European mole cricket (G. vulgaris, Latr.) has a most extraordinary and ugly form; it is nearly...
-Molecule
Molecule (Fr. molecule, diminutive of Lat. moles, a mass), a small mass of matter. The word came into use in France in the early part of the last century, and was adopted by Buff on in describing his ...
-Moliere
Moliere, the assumed name of Jean Bap-tiste Poquelin, a French dramatist, born in Paris, Jan. 15, 1(522, died there, Feb. 17, 1673. He was both the son and grandson of valets de chambre tapissiers to ...
-Mollusca
Mollusca, a branch of the invertebrate animal kingdom, so named from the general softness of the body; some of its members were first defined by Aristotle under the name of mala-Tcia (soft animals), o...
-Molluscoids
Molluscoids, a division of the old branch of mollusca first made by Milne-Edwards to in-clude the bryozoa and ascidians or tunicates, to which have since been added the brachio-pods; all of which arc ...
-Moluccas, Or Spife Islands
Moluccas, Or Spife Islands, a group of the Indian or Malay archipelago, between lat. 3 N and 9 S., and Ion. 122 and 133 E., scattered over the sea which extends from the E. coast o...
-Molybdenum
Molybdenum, a metal usually obtained from the native bisulphide (molybdenite). It is also found as a molybdate of lead. Its symbol is Mo; atomic weight, 96; specific gravity, 8.6. The resemblance of t...
-Mompos, Or Mompox
Mompos, Or Mompox, an inland city of the United States of Colombia, in the state of Santa Marta. on the Magdalena, about 300 m. N. by W. of Bogota; pop. about 11,000. The city is on a large island for...
-Moms (Flem. Bergen)
Moms (Flem. Bergen), a fortified city of Belgium, capital of the province of Hainaut, on the river Trouille, 32 m. S. S. W. of Brussels; pop. in 1871, 27,764. It communicates with the Scheldt by the c...
-Monachism
Monachism (Gr. solitary), a term denoting solitary life or retirement from the ordinary concerns of the world, with a view to the occupation of the soul with religious objects. The first type of mo...
-Monaco
Monaco, a small principality of Italy, bounded S. by the Mediterranean, and surrounded on all other sides by the French department of Alpes-Maritimes, between Nice and Ventimi-glia. At present it cons...
-Monad
Monad (Gr. , unity), in philosophy, a word used by the Neo-Platonists of the early ages of Christianity, and especially by Origen, to express an idea of Divinity, and also the union of the Divine Sp...
-Monaghan
Monaghan, an inland county of Ireland, in the province of Ulster, bordering on Tyrone, Armagh, Louth, Meath, Cavan, and Fermanagh; area, 498 sq. m.; pop. in 1871, 112,785. The. surface is in general h...
-Monastery
Monastery (Gr. a house of retirement), the place in which monks or nuns live in seclusion. (See Monaohism.) In the beginning monasteries were to be found only in solitary places; after a time some w...
-Monbuttoo
Monbuttoo, a country of central Africa, bordering on Nyam-nyam, Moruvoo, and Akka, between lat.V and 4 N., and Ion. 28 and 29 E.; area, about 4,000 sq. m.; pop. estimated by Schweinfurt...
-Moncnre Daniel Conway
Moncnre Daniel Conway, an American author, born in Stafford co., Va., March 17, 1832. He received his early education at the Fredericksburg academy, and afterward entered Dickinson college, Carlisle, ...
-Mondovi
Mondovi, a town of Piedmont, Italy, in the province of Coni, on the right bank of the El-lero, 1,810 ft. above the sea, and 53 m. W. of Genoa; pop. about 10,000. It is partly on a hill, is walled, and...
-Money
Money (Lat. and Ital. moneta), the currency of the realm or of the country; the standard of payment, whether of coins, circulating notes, or any other commodity. Anything which freely circulates from ...
-Mongolia
Mongolia, a country of Asia, part of the Chinese empire, lying between lat. 37 and 54 N.. and about Ion. 85 and 125 E., bounded N. by Siberia, N. E. and E. by Mantehooria, S. by the Chi...
-Monitor
Monitor, the common name of many of the old-world slender-tongued lizards of the family varanidai and genus varanus (Merr.). They have an elongated head; long, extensile, bifid, fleshy tongue, enclose...
-Monkey
Monkey, the common name of the family simiadeof the order quadrumana. The teeth are 32 to 36, and more or less approximate; the canines ore larger than the incisors, the upper on - separated by a cons...
-Monmouth
Monmouth, a central county of New Jersey, bordering on the Atlantic ocean, drained by the Nevisink, Shrewsbury, Shark, and Toms rivers; area, about 800 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 46,195. Its surface is gen...
-Monmouth. Battle Of
Monmouth. Battle Of, an engagement between the American forces under Washington and the British under Sir Henry Clinton, at Freehold, Monmouth co.,N. J., June 28, 1178. On June 18 Clinton evacuated Ph...
-Monmouthshire
Monmouthshire, a maritime county of England, bounded S. by the Bristol channel and the estuary of the Severn; area, 575 sq. m.; pop. in 1871, 195,391. The coast, 22 m. in extent, is exposed to the hig...
-Monod
I. Jean Jean, a French clergyman, born in Geneva in 1765, died in Paris, April 23, 1836. He officiated as pastor of the Reformed church in Paris until the outbreak of the first revolution.' when he r...
-Monogram
Monogram ((Jr. . single, and letter), a character or cipher formed by the combination of two or more letters of the alphabet. Monograms were common in anti-qnitv, and their use was almost unive...
-Monophysites
Monophysites (Gr. , from single, and , nature), the followers of Eutyches, who maintained that in Christ there is only one nature, that of the incarnate word, his human nature having been ...
-Monothelites
Monothelites (Gr. , from , single, and , to will), the name of a sect which maintained that in Christ there was but one will and one voluntary operation, while they admitted the doctrine of t...
-Monotremata
Monotremata (Gr. . , single, and , opening), an order of implacental mammals; the name is derived from the fact that the intestinal, generative, and urinary organs open into a common cloaca, as i...
-Monroe
Monroe, the name of 17 counties in the United States. I. A N. W. County Of New York A N. W. County Of New York, bounded N. by Lake Ontario and drained by the Genesee river; area, 682 sq. m.; pop. in...
-Monserrat, Or Montserrat
Monserrat, Or Montserrat, a mountain in Catalonia, Spain, on the right bank of the river Llobregat, in the province and about 25 m. N. W. of the city of Barcelona. It is about 24 m. in circumference, ...
-Monseys Moisees, Or Minsis
Monseys Moisees, Or Minsis, a tribe of American Indians formerly residing on the upper Delaware and the Minisink. In 1663 they aided the Esopus Indians in attacking the Dutch post, and were chastised ...
-Monsoon
Monsoon (Arab, mausim, season, corrupted by the Portuguese into moncao), an intertropical wind which blows part of the year from one point of the compass, and the remainder of the year in a contrary d...
-Monster
Monster, a term limited by Isidore Geof-froy Saint-IIilaire to the complex and grave congenital anomalies of conformation, disagreeable to the sight, rendering difficult or impossible the accomplishme...
-Mont Blanc
Mont Blanc. See Mont Blanc. Mont Blanc #1 Mont Blanc (Fr., White mountain, so called from the snow which covers it), the highest of the Alps, and with the exception of Mt. Elburz in the Caucasus t...
-Mont De Piete
Mont De Piete, a public institution in continental Europe, the original object of which was to deliver the needy from the charges of Jewish and Lombard money lenders. One is said to have been founded ...
-Mont Oems
Mont Oems, a mountain between the province of Turin in Italy and the department of Savoie in France, at the junction of theGraian with the Cottian Alps. It is an elevated plateau 6,773 ft. above the s...
-Montagu,Lady Mary Wortley
Montagu,Lady Mary Wortley, an English authoress, eldest daughter of Evelyn Pierrepont, duke of Kingston, born at Thoresby, Nottinghamshire, about 1690, died Aug. 21, 1762. She was related through her ...
-Montalembert
I. Marc Rene De Marc Rene De, marquis, a French military engineer, born in Angouleme, July 15, 1714, died March 29, 1800. He was descended from an ancient family of Poitou, early entered the army, an...
-Montana
Montana, a territory of the United States, situated between lat. '44 15' and 49 N, and Ion. 104 and 116 W.; length E. and W. on the N. border, 540 m., and along the 45th parallel 4...
-Montanists
Montanists, a sect of the 2d century, so called after Montanus of Phrygia. He is said to have been a priest of Cybele, and to have announced himself about 160 as a prophet, who was to carry Christiani...
-Montargis
Montargis, a town of France, in the department of Loiret, on the left bank of the Loing, and at the junction of the canals of Briare, Orleans, and the Loing, connecting the navigation of the Seine and...
-Montauban
Montauban (Lat. Mons Albanus), a town of Guienne, France, capital of the department of Tarn-et-Garonne, on the river Tarn, 343 m. S. S. W. of Paris; pop. in 1872, 25,624. It stands on a high plateau, ...
-Montcalm
Montcalm, a 8. central county of the S. peninsula of Michigan, watered by tributaries of the Muskegon, Chippewa, and Grand rivers; area, 720 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 13,629. It has an undulating surface ...
-Monte Rosa
Monte Rosa, a mountain group at the eastern extremity of the Pennine Alps, on the frontier line between the Swiss canton of Valais and the kingdom of Italy, in lat. 45 55' N., lon. 7 52' E. ...
-Montecicili, Or Montecuccoli, Raimomdo
Montecicili, Or Montecuccoli, Raimomdo, count, an Austrian general, born near Modena in 1608, died in Linz, Oct. 16, 1681. He entered the Austrian army in 1627, and distinguished himself in the thirty...
-Montenegro
Montenegro (Slav. Tzernagora or Tchcrna-gora, Turk. Karadagh, Alb. Mal Zeze or Mal Esye, Black Mountains), a semi-independent principality in European Turkey, near the Adriatic, bordering on the Turki...
-Monterey
Monterey, a W. county of California, bordering on the Pacific, bounded E. by the Coast range of mountains, intersected by the Salinas or Buenaventura river, and drained also by the San Benito and othe...
-Montevideo
Montevideo, a city, capital of Uruguay, South America, and of the department of its own name, on the N. shore of the estuary of the Rio de la Plata, 130 m. E. S. E. of Buenos Ayres, in lat. 34 53...
-Montezuma
Montezuma (Mex. Moncteptmatin, the sad or severe man), the name of two emperors of ancient Mexico. - Montezuma I., born about 1390, died in 1464. He served as general under his uncle, who preceded him...
-Montfort
I. Simon De Simon De, a French soldier, born about the middle of the 12th century, slain before Toulouse, June 25, 1218. He engaged in the fourth crusade, but when he saw the enterprise diverted from...
-Montgomery
Montgomery, the name of counties in 18 of the United States. I. An E. County Of New York An E. County Of New York, intersected by the Mohawk river, which is here joined by the Schoharie and other sm...
-Month
Month (Sax. mona, the moon), a period of time defined by one revolution of the moon around the earth, and hence equal to 29 days, 12 hours, 44 minutes, and 3 seconds. This division of time, the lunar ...
-Montholon, Or Montholon-Semonville, Charles Tristan
Montholon, Or Montholon-Semonville, Charles Tristan, count and afterward marquis de, a French soldier, born in Paris, July 21, 1783, died Aug. 21, 1853. The son of a marquis, he became in 1798 a non-c...
-Montmedy
Montmedy (anc. Mons Medius; mediaeval, Mons Maledictus), a town and fortress of the fourth class of France, in the department of Meuse, on the river Chiers and on the railway between Sedan and Thionvi...
-Montmorency
Montmorency, a N. E. county of the S. peninsula of Michigan, watered by Black and Thunder Bay rivers; area, 576 sq. m.; returned as having no population in 1870. The surface consists of rolling table ...
-Montpellier
Montpellier, a city of Languedoc, France, capital of the department of Herault, near the Lez, 27 m. S. W. of Nimes, 17 m. N. E. of Cette, its port, and 76 m. W. N. W. of Marseilles; pop. in 1872, 55,7...
-Montreal
Montreal, a city of the Dominion of Canada, in the province of Quebec, the largest in British North America, and the commercial capital of the country, in lat. 45 31' N., Ion. 73 35' W., on ...
-Montrose
Montrose, a seaport town of Forfarshire, Scotland, 23 m. N. E. of Dundee; pop.'of the borough in 1871, 14,548; of the parish, 15,783. It is on the W. side of a sandy peninsula, having the sea on the e...
-Montserrat, Or Monserrat
Montserrat, Or Monserrat, one of the smallest of the British West India islands, belonging to the Leeward group, nearly equidistant, or about 30 m., from the islands of Nevis, Antigua, and Guadeloupe;...
-Montyon, Or Montbyon, Antoine Jean Baptiste Robert Anget
Montyon, Or Montbyon, Antoine Jean Baptiste Robert Anget, baron de, a French philanthropist, born in Pari. Dec. 23 or 26, 1733 died there 1820. He was successively intenaant of the provinces of Proven...
-Mooltan Or Multan
Mooltan Or Multan, a city of British India, in the Punjaub, 193 m. S.W. of Lahore, with which it is connected by railway, and 3 m. from the left bank of the river Chenaub; pop. about 00,000. It is 3 m...
-Moon
Moon, the satellite of the earth, the nearest of the heavenly bodies to us. It is an opaque spheroid 2,159.8 m. in diameter, shining by reflecting the light of the sun. Situated at an average distance...
-Moors
Moors (Lat. Mauri; Sp. Moros; Dutch, Moors), the people of Mauritania or Morocco and adjoining parts. The Arabs who conquered Mauritania in the 7th century converted to Mohammedanism the native popula...
-Moore
I. A Central County Of North Carolina A Central County Of North Carolina, drained by Deep, Little, and Lumber rivers; area, about 700 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 12,-040, of whom 3,019 were colored. It has...
-Moorshedabad
Moorshedabad, a town of British India, in Bengal, 124 m. N. of Calcutta; pop. about 150,000, including 90,000 Brahmans and 56,000 Mussulmans. It is the most populous town of the district of Moorshedab...
-Mooruk
Mooruk, the native name of a species of struthious bird, discovered in 1857 in the island of New Britain, and named by Mr. John Gould casuarius Bennetti, in honor of Dr. George Bennett of Sydney, N S....
-Moquis
Moquis, a tribe of semi-civilized Indians in Arizona, between Ion. 110 and 111 W., and hit. 35 and 36 N., on the Little Colorado and San Juan rivers. They were among the tribes j visited in ...
-Moral Philosophy, Or Ethics
Moral Philosophy, Or Ethics (Lat. mos, Gr. , manner, practice), the science of duty; the principles which prescribe what ought to take place, and the reasons why it should take place, in human cond...
-Moran
I. Thomas Thomas, an American artist, born in Bolton. Lancashire, England, Jan. 12, 1837. His family came to the United States when he was seven years old and settled in Philadelphia. At the age of 1...
-Moratin
I. Nicolas Fernandez Nicolas Fernandez, a Spanish poet, born in Madrid, July 20,1737, died there, May 11, 1780. He was a lawyer by profession, but became the reformer of the Spanish theatre, and, wit...
-Moravia
Moravia (Slav. Morawa; Ger. Mahren), a margraviate and crown land of Austria, situated between lat. 48 40' and 50 15' N., and Ion. 15 10' and 18 28' E., bounded N. and N. E. by Pru...
-Morbihan
Morbihan, a maritime department of France, in Brittany, bordering on Cotes-du-Nord, Ille-et-Vilaine, Loire-Inferieure, Finistere, and the bay of Biscay; area, 2,625 sq. m.; pop. in 1872, 490,352 Its n...
-Mordants
Mordants (Fr., from Lat. mordere, to bite), materials used in dyeing and calico printing for the purpose of fixing the colors. Their action is in accordance with a twofold attraction for the coloring ...
-Mordccai Manuel Noah
Mordccai Manuel Noah, an American journalist, born of Jewish parents in Philadelphia, July 19, 1785, died in New York, March 22, 1851. After attempting some mechanical business, he studied law, and wh...
-Morel (Ft. Morille)
Morel (Ft. Morille), the common name for morcliella esculenta, an edible fungus found in Europe, Asia, and North America. It grows in orchards, woods, and damp pastures, preferring a heavy argillaceou...
-Morelia
Morelia, an inland city of Mexico, capital of the state of Michoacan and of a district of its own name, 125 m. W. by N. of Mexico; pop. officially estimated in 1869 at 30,000. The city stands upon a r...
-Morelos
Morelos, an inland state of Mexico, bounded by the state and the federal district of Mexico, Puebla, and Guerrero; area, 1,887 sq. m.; pop. in 1868, 121,098; in 1873, according to the annual report of...
-Morgan
Morgan, the name of counties in 10 of the United States. I. A N. E. County Of West Virginia A N. E. County Of West Virginia, bordering S. W. on Virginia, separated from Maryland by the Potomac, and ...
-Morgan Dix
Morgan Dix, an American clergyman, son of the preceding, born in New York, Nov. 1, 1827. His early education and training were received in Albany, where he resided till 1842. He graduated at Columbia ...
-Morgan Lewis
Morgan Lewis, an American soldier, son of Francis Lewis, signer of the Declaration of Independence, born in New York, Oct. 16, 1754, died there, April 7, 1844. He graduated at Princeton college in 177...
-Morgue
Morgue (from the Languedocian morga, a repulsive face), a place for the exhibition of dead bodies of unknown persons, with a view to their identification. Such establishments existed in Paris as early...
-Moritz August Beniowsky
Moritz August Beniowsky, count, a Hungarian soldier and adventurer, born at Verbo in the county of Neutra, in 1741, died May 23, 1786. He was the son of an Austrian general, served as lieutenant in th...
-Moritz Carriere
Moritz Carriere, a German philosopher, born at Griedel, March 5, 1817. He studied at Giessen, Gottingen, and Berlin, and perfected his knowledge of art in Italy. In 1842 he be-emie private teacher in ...
-Moritz Hartmann
Moritz Hartmann, a German poet of Jewish parentage, born at Duschnik, Bohemia, Oct. 15, 1821, died in Vienna, May 13, 1872. He studied in Prague and Vienna; but umbrage being taken at his liberalism, ...
-Moritz Hauptmann
Moritz Hauptmann, a German composer, born in Dresden, Oct. 13, 1792, died in Leipsic, Jan. 3, 18G8. The son of an architect, he was intended for the same profession and became proficient in mathematic...
-Mormons, Or Latter Day Saints
Mormons, Or Latter Day Saints, a sect founded by Joseph Smith, who was born at Sharon, Vt., in 1805, and was killed at Carthage, I1L, in 1844. (See Smith, Joseph.) According to his own account, Smith ...
-Morocco (Arab. Marakesh)
Morocco (Arab. Marakesh), a city and one of the capitals of the sultanate of Morocco, on the N. side of a plain 1,500 ft. above the sea, 4 m. S. of the river Tensift, and about 250 m. S. W. of Fez; la...
-Morocco, Or Marocco
Morocco, Or Marocco (Arab. Maghreb el-Aksa, the extreme west, or El-Maghreb, the west1'), a sultanate in N. W. Africa, between lat. 27 and 36 N. and Ion. 4 30' E. and 11 50' W.,...
-Morris
I. A X. County Of New Jersey A X. County Of New Jersey, bounded N. E. by the Pequonnock river, E. and S. E. by the Passaic, and drained by Rock-away and Whippany rivers and the head branches of the R...
-Morris Dance
Morris Dance, an old English dance, usually performed with castanets, tabors, staves, or swords, by young men lightly dressed, with bells fixed about their legs, and parti-colored ribbons streaming fr...
-Morristown
Morristown, a post village in Morris township, capital of Morris co., New Jersey, on the Whippany river and the Morris and Essex division of the Delaware, Lackawanna, and Western railroad, 43 m. N. N....
-Morse (2)
I. Jedidiah Jedidiah, an American geographer, born in Woodstock, Conn., Aug. 23, 1761, died in New Haven, June 9, 1826. He graduated at Yale college in 1783, was licensed to preach in 1785, in 1786 w...
-Morse, Or Sea Horse Trichechus Rosmarus, Linn (Walrus)
Morse, Or Sea Horse Trichechus Rosmarus, Linn (Walrus)), a marine arctic mammal, resembling the large seals in external appearance, but having dental affinities with the ungulates. The skull is not ve...
-Mortgage
Mortgage (Fr. mort, dead, and gage, pledge; Lat. vadium mortuum). Kent defines a mortgage to be the conveyance of an estate by way of pledge for the security of a debt, to become void on payment of i...
-Mortmain
Mortmain (Fr. mort, dead, and main, hand; Lat. mortua manus). tinder the system of feudal tenures, the lords of estates enjoyed certain privileges on the death or change of their vassals. When the ten...
-Mosasaurus
Mosasaurus, a gigantic fossil reptile, so . named by Conybeare from its having been first found on the banks of the river Maas, near Maestricht in Holland, in the upper cretaceous formations of that d...
-Moscas, Or Clibchas
Moscas, Or Clibchas, a nation of South American Indians in what is now the United States of Colombia. They were highly advanced in civilization, founded an empire, and reduced all the tribes between S...
-Moscow (Russ. Moskva)
I. A Central Government Of Russia A Central Government Of Russia, bordering on Tver, Vladimir, Riazan, Tula, Kaluga, and Smolensk;. area, 12,854 sq. m.; pop. in 1867, 1,678,784. Its surface is low an...
-Moser
I. Johann Jakob Johann Jakob, a German jurist, born in Stuttgart, Jan. 18, 1701, died there, Sept. 30, 1785. He was educated at the university of Tubingen, where at the age of 19 he was appointed tea...
-Moses Maimonides
Moses Maimonides (Heb. Rabbi Mosheh hn Maimon, commonly abridged into the initial name Rambam; Arab. Abu Amram Mttsa tin Abdullah ibn Maimon ul-Kortobi), a Jewish theologian and philosopher, born in C...
-Moses Mendelssohn
Moses Mendelssohn, a German philosopher, born in Dessau, Sept. 6,1729, died Jan. 4,1786. His father was a Jewish transcriber of the Pentateuch and master of a Hebrew day school. He was early sent to t...
-Moses Stuart
Moses Stuart, an American author, born at Wilton. Conn., March 26, 1780, died in Ando-ver, Mass., Jan. 4, 1852. He graduated at Yale college in 1799, was admitted to the bar in 1802, and for the two s...
-Moses Yale Beach
Moses Yale Beach, an American mechanic and editor, born at Wallingford, Conn., Jan. 7, 1800, died there, July 19, 1868. At the age of 14 he was apprenticed to' a cabinet-maker at Hartford, but purchas...
-Mosque
Mosque (Arab, mesjid, place of prayer), a Mohammedan temple or house of worship. The first mosque was erected by Mohammed at Medina, part of the work being done by his own hands. The site was a grav...
-Mosses (Musci)
Mosses (Musci), a large family of cryptoga-mic plants, the study of which forms a distinct department of botany called bryology (Gr. , moss), or muscology. Mosses have distinct stems, leaves, flower...
-Mosul, Or Mossul
Mosul, Or Mossul, a town of Asiatic Turkey, capital of a district of the same name in the vilavet of Diarbekir, on the right bank of the Tigris, 220 m. N. N. W. of Bagdad; pop. about 40,000, of whom 9...
-Moth (Ptialama Linn)
Moth (Ptialama Linn), the common name of the third and last section of the order lepi-doptera, the other two having been described under Butterfly and Hawk Moth. This section includes a great number o...
-Motherwort
Motherwort (honurus cardiaca; Gr. , a lion, and a tail), a plant belonging to the mint family or laliatm. It is met with around walls, fences, and neglected spots near farms and gardens. The root...
-Motmot
Motmot (momotus, Briss.; priorities, 111.), a genus of American fissirostral birds of the family of rollers and subfamily momotina. The single genus is characterized by a bill rather long, slightly cu...
-Motpelier
Motpelier, a town of Washington co., Vermont, capital of the county and state, situated on the Onion river, here spanned by a substantial bridge, and on the Central Vermont and the Montpelier and Well...
-Moumdsville
Moumdsville, a town and the capital of Marshall co., West Virginia, 12 m. below Wheeling, on the left bank of the Ohio, between two streams called Big and Little Grave creeks; pop. in 1870, 1,500. The...
-Mount Desert
Mount Desert, an island of the state of Maine, at the southern extremity of Hancock co., in Frenchman's bay, about 30 m. S. E. of Bangor; pop. in 1870, 3,935. The island is 14 m. long and 8 m. broad, ...
-Mount Of, Or Monnt Olivet Olives
Mount Of, Or Monnt Olivet Olives (Aral). Jebel et-Tur), a mountain of Palestine celebrated in Biblical history. It is a few hundred yards E. of Jerusalem, separated from it by the valley of Jehoshapha...
-Mount Tabor
Mount Tabor (Gr. 'A; now Jebel et-Tur), an insulated eminence in the plain of Esdraelon, about 6 m. S. E. of Nazareth, in Galilee, commonly regarded as ...
-Mount Vernon
Mount Vernon, the home and burial place of George Washington, on the right bank of the Potomac in Fairfax co., Va., 9 m. S. by TV. of Alexandria and 15 m. from Washington city. At the time of Washingt...
-Mountain
Mountain, a considerable elevation of the earth's surface, either isolated or arranged in a linear manner. Great regions of the earth are much elevated above the sea, forming high plains, called table...
-Mourning
Mourning, an outward manifestation of grief, particularly on occasions of death. Every nation has some conventional form of mourning. The ancient Hebrews tore their garments, dishevelled their hair, t...
-Mouse
Mouse, the common name of the smaller members of the rodent subfamily murium. This subfamily is characterized by incisors smooth in front and compressed laterally; molars 3-3 or -2-2. rooted, the ante...
-Mow
Mow, a counter-irritant used especially in of gout, rheumatism, and nervous dis-orders. It is of Japanese invention, having been in use in that country many centuries. The tenn is derived from the Jap...
-Mowing And Reaping Machines
Mowing And Reaping Machines, mechanical devices for cutting grain or grass by animal power. Though this invention was suggested by the ancient Romans, the first experiments toward practical results we...
-Moxos, Or Mojos
Moxos, Or Mojos, a nation of Indians in South America, occupying a large tract in Bolivia, between lat. 13 and 160 S., and lon. 64 and 69 W. They believed that they originated on the spot, a...
-Mozambique (Port. Mozambique)
I. A Name Applied To A Large Extent Of The Seaboard Of E. Africa A Name Applied To A Large Extent Of The Seaboard Of E. Africa, belonging to Portugal; area, about 380,000 sq. m.; pop. about 300,000. ...
-Mozart
I. Johann Georg Leopold Johann Georg Leopold, a German musician, born in Augsburg, Nov. 14, 1719, died May 28, 1787. He excelled on the organ when a youth, and paid his way while studying law by teac...
-Mrs. George Ann Bellamy
Mrs. George Ann Bellamy, an English actress, born in London, April 23, 1733, died in Edinburgh, Feb. 15, 1788. Her mother, who had been Lord Tyrawley's mistress, married Capt. Bellamy, who abandoned h...
-Mrs. Newton Crosland
Mrs. Newton Crosland, better known by her maiden name of Camilla Toulmin, an English authoress, born in London, June 9, 1812. She first appeared in print in 1838 as the author of a short poem in the ...
-Mrs. R. Bowdich Lee
Mrs. R. Bowdich Lee, an English authoress, born about 1800, died in 1856. During a residence in Gold Coast colony, Africa, whither her first husband, Mr. T. E. Bowdich, had been sent on a mission of p...
-Msi Pries
Msi Pries, a law term, which originated as follows. Anciently, nearly all actions in England of any importance were begun and tried before the courts of Westminster. But when the custom began of bring...
-Mtre-Rios
Mtre-Rios, a province of the Argentine Republic, bordered E., S., and W. by the rivers Parana and Uruguay, whence its name (between rivers). It is bounded N. by Cor-rientes, E. by the republic of Urug...
-Mtzsch
I. Karl Ludwig Karl Ludwig, a German theologian, born in Wittenberg, Aug. 0, 1751, died there, Dec. 5, 1831. In 1781 he became preacher at Beucha, and in 1790 superintendent general and professor of ...
-Mucus
Mucus, a transparent, colorless, and glairy or viscid fluid, exuded upon the free surface of the mucous membranes of the living body. It is the secretion of the numerous glandulae or follicles with wh...
-Mud Fish
Mud Fish (amia, Linn.), a genus of American ganoids, found in the fresh waters of the United States. After it had been referred by ichthyologists to cyprinoid, salmonoid, and clupeoid fishes, Vogt dis...
-Muezzin
Muezzin (Arab, mueddzin, caller, proclaim-er), an officer of a mosque who calls the faithful to prayer, as prescribed in the Koran, at dawn, near noon, in the afternoon, a little after sunset, and at ...
-Mufti
Mufti (Arab., one who expounds the law) a doctor of the law of the Koran who performs certain religious and civil functions. There is one in every large town of the Ottoman empire. In his religious ca...
-Mulberry, A Name
A Name Mulberry, the derivation of which is obscurely traced to morus, the Latin name of a genus of trees which some botanists place in a division of the nettle family (urticaceoe), while others make ...
-Mulgrave
I. Constantino John Phipps Constantino John Phipps, lord, a British navigator, born May 30, 1744, died in Liege, Belgium, Oct. lo. 1792. His father was raised to the Irish peerage as Baron Mul-grave ...
-Mullein
Mullein, the common name of verbascum thapsus, said to be derived from the Latin rnalandrium, a disease like leprosy, applied to this plant on account of its having been used for this and similar dise...
-Muller
I. Johann Gotthard Von Johann Gotthard Von, a German engraver, born at Bernhausen, near Stuttgart, May 4, 1747, died in Stuttgart, March 14, 1830. He prepared himself for the church, but attended at ...
-Mullet
Mullet, a name given to two families of acanthopterygian fishes, the muailidm and the mullidoe, though the latter, to avoid confusion are better styled surmullets. In the mugilidce the body is more or...
-Multnomah
Multnomah, a N. W. county of Oregon, bordering E. on the Cascade mountains, bounded N. by the Columbia river, and intersected in the west by the Willamette; area, about 400 sq. m.; pop. in 1870; 11,51...
-Mummy
Mummy (Persian and Arabic, mumiya, from the Persian mum, naphtha or liquid asphal-tuni), a dead body embalmed, or preserved from decay by desiccation. The custom of thus preserving the bodies of the d...
-Mumps
Mumps (cynanche parotidea, parotitis), a specific inflammation of the parotid and submaxillary glands. This curious affection, called by the Scotch branks, and by the French oreil-Iojis or ourles, has...
-Munch
I. Peder Andreas Peder Andreas, a Norwegian historian, born in Christiania, Dec. 15, 1810. died in Rome, May 25, 1863. He graduated in 1834 at the university of Christiania for the civil service, but...
-Munster
Munster, a city of Germany, capital of the Prussian province of Westphalia and of a district of its own name, on the small river Aa, connected by railway with Düsseldorf, and with the river Ems by a c...
-Munter
I. Balthasiir Balthasiir, a German clergyman, born in Lübeck, March 24, 1735, died in Copenhagen, Oct. 5, 1793. He studied theology at Jena, was for a time a preacher at Gotha, and became celebrated ...
-Muntjac
Muntjac (cervicitis, De Blainv., or stylocerus, H. Smith), the name of several small East Indian deer, which seem to make the transition from the typical cervidoe to the musk deer. The horns are small...
-Murat Halstead
Murat Halstead, an American journalist, born at Ross, Butler co., Ohio, Sept. 2, 1829. Until the age of 19 he passed the summers in working on his father's farm and the winters at school. He completed...
-Muravieff
Muravieff, an ancient Russian family, originally settled in the former grand duchy of Moscow, and since the latter part of the 15th century in various other parts of the country. I. Mikhail Mikhail,...
-Murchison Sir Roderick Impey
Murchison Sir Roderick Impey, a British geologist, born at Tarradale, Ross-shire, Scotland, Feb. 19, 1792, died in London, Oct. 22, 1871. He obtained a commission in the army in 1807, served during a ...
-Murcia
I. An Ancient Kingdom Of Spain An Ancient Kingdom Of Spain, bounded N. W. and N. by New Castile, N. E. and E. by the province of Valencia and the Mediterranean, S. E. and S. by the Mediterranean and ...
-Murder
Murder, a crime defined by Blackstone as the unlawful killing of any reasonable creature in being, and under the king's peace, with malice aforethought, either express or implied, by a person of sou...
-Murex
Murex, a genus of gasteropod mollusks, found in almost all temperate and tropical seas at depths varying from 25 to 60 fathoms. About 200 living species are known, and 160 fossil, chiefly belonging to...
-Murfreesboro
Murfreesboro, a city and the capital of Rutherford co., Tennessee, situated near the centre of the state, on an elevated and healthy plain bounded E. by the Cumberland mountains, on the Nashville and ...
-Murrain
Murrain (Span, morrina, from Lat. mori, to die; or Gr., to waste, to destroy), a term applied to various fatal contagious epizootics, and therefore an equivalent to some extent of the Greek?., Latin p...
-Murray, Or Goolwa
Murray, Or Goolwa, a river of Australia, which rises in the Warragong mountains, in lat. 36 20' S., lon. 148 15' E. Its course is very tortuous, the curvatures being short, abrupt, and almos...
-Murray, Or Moray, James Stuart
Murray, Or Moray, James Stuart, earl of, regent of Scotland, born about 1533, killed at Linlithgow, Jan. 23, 1570. He was an illegitimate son of james V. and Lady Margaret, daughter of John, fourth Lo...
-Muscardijve
Muscardijve, a name given by the French to a disease which for the last 20 years has proved very destructive to silkworms, and has seriously interfered with the production of silk in France and other ...
-Muscat, Or Mascat
Muscat, Or Mascat, the chief city of Oman, in Arabia, situated at the head of a small inlet of the Indian ocean, in lat. 23 38' N., lon. 58 40' E., about 240 m. S. E. of the entrance to the ...
-Muscatine
Muscatine, a S. E. county of Iowa, bordering on Illinois from which it is separated by the Mississippi, and intersected by Red Cedar river; area, 440 sq. m. pop. in 1870, 21,088. It has a diversified ...
-Muscle
Muscle (Lat. musculus), the fibrous contractile tissue forming the flesh of man and animals, by which locomotion and the various functions of life requiring voluntary or involuntary movements are perf...
-Muses
Muses (Gr. ), in classical mythology, the goddesses originally of song, and afterward of all kinds of poetry and of the arts and sciences. According to the earliest legends, they had their principal s...
-Museum (Gr. A Temple Of The Muses)
Museum (Gr. A Temple Of The Muses), a repository of objects relating to history, science, or the arts. In the modern sense of the term the temples of Apollo at Delphi and Juno at Samos, and the acropo...
-Mushroom
Mushroom (Fr. mousseron, hommousse, moss, because mushrooms are often found growing in it), the name of several edible fungi, chiefly of the genus agaricus. The genus is large, and contains the most h...
-Musical Box
Musical Box, a case enclosing mechanism so constructed as to play tunes automatically. The principle of the mechanism is the same as that of the barrel or hand organ, and of the machinery which is use...
-Musjeus
I. A Greek Poet A Greek Poet, who flourished at Athens in prehistoric times. He was said by some to have been a native of Thrace and a son of Orpheus; while others represented him as the son of Eumol...
-Musk
Musk, a concretionary substance of peculiar and most powerful odor, which is secreted in a projecting hairy sac or bag between the umbilicus and the prepuce of the male of a small Asiatic animal, call...
-Musk Ox
Musk Ox (ovibos moschatus, De Blainv.), a ruminating animal found in the arctic regions of America, seeming to form, as its generic name imports, the connecting link between the ox and the sheep. It i...
-Muskegon
Muskegon, a S. W. county of the S. peninsula of Michigan, bordering on Lake Michigan, and watered by White and Muskegon rivers and other streams; area, about 500 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 14,89-4. The sur...
-Musket
Musket, the smooth-bored firearm with which the infantry of all civilized nations lias been armed from the beginning of the 18th century until nearly the present time. The best authorities give the de...
-Muskingum
Muskingum, a river of Ohio, formed by the junction of the Walhonding and Tuscarawas, which rise in the N. part of the state and unite at Coshocton, whence it flows S. E. for about 110 m. through Muski...
-Muskrat (Fiber Zibethicus, Cuv.)
Muskrat (Fiber Zibethicus, Cuv.), an American rodent, the only species of its genus, well known for its aquatic habits; it is also called musquash, musk beaver, and ondatra. The dentition is: incisors...
-Mussel, Or Muscle
Mussel, Or Muscle (Lat. musculus; Ger. Mu-schel), a well known lamellibranchiate mollusk of the genus mytilus (Linn.). It belongs to the dimyarian group, or those having two adductor muscles, the ante...
-Mustapha Mehemed Reshid Pasha
Mustapha Mehemed Reshid Pasha, a Turkish statesman, born in Constantinople in 1802, died there, Jan. 7, 1858. He was educated by Ali Pasha, who had married his sister, and was governor of a province i...
-Mustard
Mustard, the name of a well known condiment as well as of the plants which produce it. In commerce two sorts of mustard seed are known, the white and the black, which are produced by plants formerly c...
-Mutiny
Mutiny (Fr. mutin, refractory, stubborn; mutiner, to rise in arms). A century ago the word mutiny was, as we learn from lexicographers, often used in describing insurrection or sedition in civil socie...
-Muttra
Muttra, a city of British India, in the Northwestern Provinces, capital of a district of the same name, on the W. bank of the Jumna, 30 m. N. K W. of Agra; pop. in 1872, 51,540. It is picturesquely...
-Muzk, Or Indian Corn (Zea Mays)
Muzk, Or Indian Corn (Zea Mays), a valuable grass of the tribe of phalaridece. The stems, unlike those of most grasses, are solid, with well defined nodes, and often producing from the lower nodes aer...
-Mycenae Or Myccne
Mycenae Or Myccne, a city of ancient Greece, situated on a rocky hill at the N. E. extremity of the plain of Argos. It is said to have been founded by Perseus, and its massive walls were deemed the wo...
-Myconi, Or Mycono (Anc. Myconus)
Myconi, Or Mycono (Anc. Myconus), an island of Greece, in the Aegean sea, one of the Cy-clades, lying E. of Delos and N. of Naxos, about 10 m. long and 6 m. wide; pop. about 6,000. Its highest summit ...
-Mylodon
Mylodon (Gr. mill, and, tooth), a genus of gigantic fossil edentates established by Prof. Owen, and closely allied to the sloth, resembling megalonyx and megatherium. The mylodon has the heavy form of...
-Myrmecobius
Myrmecobius, a genus of marsupial animals, established by Waterhouse, of which the typical species is the M. 'fasciatus of southern and western Australia. The teeth are very numerous, being incisors -...
-Myrrh
Myrrh (Heb. mor), a gum resin mentioned in the Old Testament as an article of commerce, and one of the oldest medicinal articles of which we have any record. Though the drug has been well known for ma...
-Myrtle
Myrtle, a name which, with or without a prefix, is given to several widely different plants, but properly belonging to myrtus communis, an evergreen shrub of the Mediterranean region, which is the typ...
-Mysia
Mysia, in ancient geography, a X. W. division of Asia Minor, the boundaries of which greatly varied at different periods. In the time of the early Roman emperors it was bounded N. by the Propontis (se...
-Mysore
I. A Native State Of India A Native State Of India, under British protection, situated between lat. 11 30 and 15 N and lon. 74 45' and 78 45' E., and surrounded on all sides by th...
-Mysteries
Mysteries (Gr. , from, to shut the lips), ceremonies in ancient religions to which only the initiated were admitted. They may be obscurely traced in the early Orient, in the rites of Isis and Osiris i...
-Mythology
Mythology (Gr., a saying, and, discourse), the science of myths. The ancient Greeks applied the term to all classes of narratives, but especially to their religious and poetic traditions of gods, hero...
-Mytilexe, Or Mitylene
Mytilexe, Or Mitylene (anc. Lesbos), an island of the Grecian archipelago, belonging to Turkey, separated from the coast of Asia Minor by a strait from 7 to 10 m. broad; area, 276 sq. m.; pop. previou...
-Myxinoids
Myxinoids, an order of fishes, which, with the cyclostomes or lampreys, form the class of myzonts of Agassiz, containing the lowest of the vertebrates. They form the family hy-perotreta (Mull.; marsip...
-N
THE 14th letter and the 11th conso-, nant of the English alphabet, corresponding to the 14th letter of the Phoenician alphabet, the nun, the name of which in the Semitic languages signifies fish. The ...
-Nabis
Nabis, a Spartan tyrant who raised himself to supreme power on the death of Machanidas in 207 B. C. He caused the young son of the deceased king Lycurgus to be assassinated; the most influential citiz...
-Nadir Shah, Or Kuli Khan
Nadir Shah, Or Kuli Khan, a king of Persia, born in Khorasan in 1688, assassinated June 19 or 20, 1747. His father was a maker of sheepskin caps and coats. For four years Nadir was held in captivity b...
-Nagasaki
Nagasaki (i. e., Long Cape), a seaport town of Japan, in the province of Ilizen, in the west of the island of Kiushiu, the seat of government of the Teen or prefecture of the same name; pop. about 30,...
-Nagoya
Nagoya, the fourth largest city of Japan, on the main island, in the province of Owari, capital of the Aichi ken or prefecture, near the head of Owari bay, about 170 m. W. S. W. of Tokio; pop. about 4...
-Nagpore, Or Nagpoor
Nagpore, Or Nagpoor, a city of central India, capital of the province of Berar or Nagpore, situated in lat. 21 9' N., Ion. 79 11' E., 420 m. E. N. E. of Bombay, with which city it is connect...
-Nahant
Nahant, a town of Essex co., Massachusetts, 10 m. N. E. of Boston by water; pop. in 1870, 475. It consists of a peninsula, projecting about 3½ m. into Massachusetts bay, and connected with Lynn by a n...
-Nail
Nail (Sax. ncegel; Ger. Nagel), a piece of metal, more or less sharp at one end with a head at the other, used to fasten together pieces of wood or other material by being driven into or through them....
-Names
Names, words by which particular objects are indicated. Names of persons were originally usually of a single word, as in the Hebrew genealogies, Terah, Levi, Aaron. The same is true of the earlier nam...
-Namur
I. A Province Of Belgium A Province Of Belgium, bounded N. by Brabant, N. E. by Liege, E. by Luxemburg, S. by France, and AV. by Hainaut; area, 1,413 sq. m.; pop. in 1872, 314,718. The principal rive...
-Nana Sahib
Nana Sahib, the title of Dhundoo Punt, a Hindoo chieftain and a leader of the sepoy nutiny in 1857, born in 1824 or 1825. He was the son of a Brahman of the Deccan, and when a little more than a year ...
-Nancy
Nancy, a city of France, capital of the department of Meurthe-et-Moselle on the left hank of the river Meurthe, 170 m. E. of Paris; pop. in 1872, 52,978. It stands in a beautiful and fertile plain, an...
-Nanking, Or Nankin
Nanking, Or Nankin (i. e., the southern capital, in distinction from Peking, the northern capital), called also Kiangnixg-fu, a city of China, the chief town of the province of Kiangsu, and the ...
-Nantucket
Nantucket, a town and county of Massachusetts, coextensive with each other, comprising the island of Nantucket, the islets of Tuckernuck and Muskeget, and the Gravelly and Swyle islands adjacent to it...
-Naphtha
Naphtha, a term originally applied to a variety of pungent, volatile, inflammable liquids, chiefly belonging to the class of ethers; it was then extended to oils of natural origin, rock oil, petroleum...
-Naphthaline
Naphthaline (dolls), a hydrocarbon obtained from the distillation of numerous organic bodies, such as coal, wood, resin, oils, and animal substances; also by conducting the vapor of acetic acid, alcoh...
-Naples (2)
Naples (Ital. Napoli; anc. Neajwlis), the largest city of Italy, in the province of the same name, on the N. coast of the bay of Naples, and on the river Sebeto, in the immediate vicinity of Mt. Vesuv...
-Napoleon Bonaparte
Napoleon Bonaparte, emperor of France, born in Ajaccio, Corsica, Aug. 15, 1769, two months after the conquest of the island by the French, died at St. Helena, May 5, 1821. It is related that, his moth...
-Napoleon Gobert
Napoleon Gobert, baron, a French philanthropist, born in 1807, died in Cairo, Egypt, in 1833. He was the son of a general, and godson of Napoleon. He served in the army without distinction. By his wil...
-Napoleon III Bonaparte
(Charles Louis Napoleon, popularly known as Louis Napoleon), born in Paris, April 20, 1808, died at Chiselhurst, England, Jan. 9,1873. His mother, Hortense de Beauharnais, had for some time lived apar...
-Napoleone Elisa Bacciochi
Napoleone Elisa Bacciochi, a Bonaparte princess, cousin of Napoleon III., only daughter of Elisa, the eldest sister of Napoleon I., princess of Lucca and Piombino, and afterward grand duchess of Tusca...
-Narbonne
Narbonne (anc. JSfaroo Martins), a city of Languedoc, France, in the department of Aude, near the Mediterranean, with which it is connected by a canal, 33 m. E. of Carcassonne, and 54 m. S. W. of Mont...
-Narciso Lopez
Narciso Lopez, a Cuban revolutionist, born in Venezuela in 1799, garroted in Havana, Sept. 1, 1851. He was the son of a wealthy merchant, and at an early age sympathized with the national independence...
-Narcissus
I. A Mythical Youth A Mythical Youth, son of the river god Cephissus and the nymph Liriope, who was remarkable for his beauty, but wholly inaccessible to love. The nymph Echo died of grief because he...
-Narcissus (2)
Narcissus, the common as well as the botanical name of a genus of popular garden flowers. It is often said that the name is from that of the youth of Grecian mythology who was turned into the flower. ...
-Nares
I. James James, an English composer, born at Stanwell, Middlesex, in 1715, died in 1783. He was educated as a chorister at King's chapel, London, under Bernard Gates and Dr. Pepusch. In 1731 he was a...
-Narhitchevan
I. A Town Of European Russia A Town Of European Russia, in the government of Yekaterinoslav, on the right bank of the Don, about 30 from its mouth, and 7 m. E. N. E. of Rostov; pop. in 1871, 16,584, ...
-Narragajvsetts
Narragajvsetts, an Algonquin tribe of American Indians, who occupied the territory now comprised in Rhode Island. They were less warlike and more industrious than the Pequots. They had 12 towns within...
-Narses
Narses, a Byzantine general, born about A. D. 473, died in Rome about 568. He was a eunnch and a slave of Justinian, but rendering important services to his master during the riots of the blue and ...
-Narwhal
Narwhal, a cetacean mammal, of the genus monodon (Linn.), frequenting the arctic seas; it- popular name is sea unicorn. It has no proper teeth, but in the males, and sometimes in the females, there ar...
-Nascapees
Nascapees, and Nehiroirini or Montagnais, Indian tribes of Labrador, the most easterly division of the great Algonquin nation. The Nehiroirini, called Montagnais by the French Canadians, now occupy th...
-Naseby
Naseby, a village of Northamptonshire, England, 12 m. N. N. W. of Northampton, where was fought a decisive battle between Charles I. and the parliamentary forces under Fairfax, June 14, 1645. After th...
-Nashua River
Nashua River, from which a canal has been cut, 3 m. long, 60 ft. wide, and 8 ft. deep, with a head and fall of 36 ft. The Jackson company, with 766 looms and 22,000 spindles, produces tings and shirti...
-Nashville
Nashville, a port of delivery and the capital of Tennessee, seat of justice of Davidson co., the second city of the state in point of population, situated on the S. bank of the Cumberland river, 200 m...
-Nassau
Nassau, formerly a German duchy, bounded by the Prussian provinces of the Rhine and Westphalia, by Hesse-Darmstadt, Hesse-Cassel, Hesse-Homburg, and Frankfort; area, 1,808 sq. m.; pop. in 1866, 468,31...
-Nastirtium
Nasti'Rtium, the generic name of a plant of the cruciferoe or mustard family, and the common name of the widely different genus tropoeolum. The genus nasturtium (Lat. nasus tortus, a tortured nose, so...
-Natal
Natal, a British colony in S. E. Africa, N. E. of Cape Colony, from which it is separated by Caffraria along the coast. It lies between lat, 27 30' and 31 30' S., and lon. 28 30' and 32...
-Natchez
Natchez, a tribe of North American Indians, known to Europeans from 1560, when Tristan de Luna aided the gulf tribes against them. With the Tensas, a kindred tribe, they held a tract on the E. bank of...
-Natchitoches
Natchitoches, a tribe of American Indians, allied to the Caddoes, and formerly residing on Red river, Louisiana, with a fortified town on an island. The Washitas and Capichis were united with them. Th...
-Nathan Bangs
Nathan Bangs, D. D., an American clergyman, born at Stratford, Conn., May 2, 1778, died May 3, 1862. He entered the itinerant ministry of the Methodist Episcopal church in 1801. After seven years of l...
-Nathan Dane
Nathan Dane, an American jurist, born in Ipswich, Mass., Dec. 27, 1752, died in Beverly, Feb. 15, 1835. He graduated at Harvard college in 1778, studied law in Salem, and commenced its practice in Bev...
-Nathan Lord
Nathan Lord, an American clergyman, born at Berwick, Me., Nov. 28, 1793, died at Hanover, N. H., Sept. 9, 1870. He graduated at Bowdoin college in 1809, and at Andover theological seminary in 1815. In...
-Nathan Read
Nathan Read, an American inventor, born at Warren, Worcester co., Mass., July 2, 1759, died near Belfast, Me., Jan. 20, 1849. He graduated at Harvard college in 1781, and was tutor there for four yea...
-Nathanael Emmons
Nathanael Emmons, an American theologian, born in East Haddam, Conn., April 20, 1745, died in Franklin, Mass., Sept. 23, 1840. He graduated at Yale college in 1767, was licensed to preach in 1769, and...
-Nathanael Greene
Nathanael Greene, an American soldier, horn at Potowhommet, Warwick co., R. I., May 27, 1742, died near Savannah, Ga., June 19, 1786. His father had a farm and a forge, and was a leading preacher amon...
-Nathanael Pringsheim
Nathanael Pringsheim, a German botanist, of Jewish parentage, born near Landsberg, Silesia, Nov. 30, 1823. He studied in several German universities and in Paris, went to Berlin in 1851, and in 1857 c...
-Nathaniel Bacon
Nathaniel Bacon, commonly called the Virginia rebel, born in London about 1630, died in January, 1677. He emigrated to Virginia in 1675, during the administration of Sir William Berkeley. His abilitie...
-Nathaniel Bowditch
Nathaniel Bowditch, an American mathematician, born in Salem, Mass., March 26,1773, died in Boston, March 16, 1838. The son of a cooper, he was sent to school till 10 years of age, and was then taken ...
-Nathaniel Lyon
Nathaniel Lyon, an American soldier, born at Ashford, Conn., July 14, 1819, killed at Wilson's creek, Missouri, Aug. 10,1861. He graduated at West Point in 1841, and served in the Florida and Mexican ...
-Nathaniel Macon
Nathaniel Macon, an American statesman, born in Warren co., N. C, in 1757, died at his plantation in the same county, June 29, 1837. He was studying at Princeton, N. J., at the opening of the war of t...
-Nathaniel S Beman
Nathaniel S Beman. S., an American clergyman, born at New Lebanon, N. Y., in 1785, died at Carbondale, 111., Aug. 8,1871. He graduated at Middlebury college in 1807, studied theology, and about 1810 w...
-Nathaniel Ward
Nathaniel Ward, an English clergyman, born at Haverhill, Suffolk, about 1570, died at Shenfield, Essex, in 1653. He was the son of a Puritan clergyman, graduated at Emmanuel college, Cambridge, in 160...
-Nathaniel William Taylor
Nathaniel William Taylor, an American clergyman, born in New Milford, Conn., June 23, 1786, died in New Haven, March 10, 1858. He graduated at Yale college in 1807, studied theology, and in 1812 was o...
-National Guard
National Guard, a system of militia instituted in France in 1789. The court had concentrated at the gates of the capital an army of 30,-000 regular troops. To counteract this demonstration, the citize...
-Natural Coke
At the coal mines of the lias formation, on both sides of the James river, and near Richmond, Va., beds of natural coke of good workable quality are met with, interstratified with the slates, sandston...
-Natural. I Bridge
In Rockbridge co., Virginia, 115 m. W. of Richmond, and 160 m. S. W. of Washington. It is distant by stage road from Lexington, the capital of the county, 14 m.; is 30 m. from Bonsack's, the nearest s...
-Naturalization
Naturalization, the act of investing an alien with the rights and privileges of a native-born citizen or subject. It is of two kinds, collective and personal. A collective naturalization takes place w...
-Nauhfim
Nauhfim, a watering place of Hesse-Darm-stadt, Germany, 17 m. X. of Frankfort; pop. about 2,500. The salt works here are of great antiquity, hut baths were first established in 1834, and the number of...
-Naumann
I. Johann Gottlieb Johann Gottlieb, a German composer, born at Blasewitz, near Dresden, April 17, 1741. died in Dresden, Oct. 23, 1801. When 13 years of age he went to Italy, and afterward settled in...
-Naumburg
Naumburg, a fortified town of Prussia, in the province of Saxony, on the Saale, near the junction of the Unstrut, 23 m. S. S. W. of Halle; pop. in 1871, 15,120. It is an active manufacturing and comme...
-Nausea
Nausea (from Gr., a ship, from its presence in sea sickness), the sickening sensation at the pit of the stomach which usually precedes vomiting. Nausea may be produced by a variety of causes: by the i...
-Nautilus
Nautilus (Gr. , from , a ship), a name applied to both the tetrabranchiate and dibranchiate orders of the cephalopod mollusks. In the former the true or pearly nautilus is the best known species of th...
-Nauvoo
Nauvoo, a township of Hancock co., Illinois, on a bend of the Mississippi river, near the head of the lower rapids, 52 m. above Quincy and 220 m. above St. Louis; pop. in 1870, 1,578. The city of Nauv...
-Navajos
Navajos, the most northerly band of the Apache Indians, inhabiting the table lands and mountains of a district on the San Juan and Little Colorado, called by the Spaniards Navajo;!, whence they were s...
-Naval Signals
Naval signals are frequently mentioned by the classical writers, and recent investigation has discovered the fact that the system which prevailed during the naval supremacy of Greece and Carthage bore...
-Navarre
Navarre (Span. Navarro), a NT. province of Spain, between Aragon, Old Castile, and Biscay, bounded N. by France and the Pyrenees, E. by the provinces of Huesca and Saragossa, S. by Saragossa and Logro...
-Navigation
Navigation, the art or system of rules and practices by means of which vessels are directed in their course upon the water. Prior to the invention of the mariner's compass navigation was limited to en...
-Navigation Laws
Navigation Laws, the name usually given to those enactments by which commercial states have endeavored to regulate the navigation which left or visited their ports, seeking always to favor and promote...
-Navy
Navy, a collective term for the vessels of war belonging to a nation. The sea-going vessels of Phoenicia and Carthage, of Greece and Rome, were flat-bottomed barges or galleys, unable to live in a gal...
-Naxos, Or Naxia
Naxos, Or Naxia, an island of Greece, and the largest of the Cyclades, in the Archipelgo, 5 m. E. of Paros; length about 20 m., greatest breadth 14 m.; area, about 150 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 11,508; of...
-Nazareth
Nazareth (now En-Nazireh), a town of Palestine, 20 m. S. E. of Acre, and 65 m. N. of Jerusalem; pop. about 4,000, about one fourth of whom are of the Greek church, the rest being Moslems, Greek Cathol...
-Ne Exeat
The writ ne exeat regno in Eng-land, and ne exeat respublica in the United State, is issued by the court of chancery to restrain a defendant in a pending suit from leaving the country. It is directed ...
-Nearchts
Nearchts, a Greek admiral of the 4th century B. C. He was a native of Crete, was prominent at the court of Macedon during the reign of Philip, and having participated in the intrigues of Alexander aga...
-Nebraska
Nebraska, a western state of the American Union, the 24th admitted under the constitution, lying between lat. 40 and 43 N., and lon. 95 25' and 104 W. from Greenwich. It is bounded...
-Nebraska City
Nebraska City, a city and the capital of Otoe co., Nebraska, on the Missouri river, at the terminus of the Midland Pacific railroad, 35 m. S. of Omaha, and 45 m. E. by S. of Lincoln; pop. in 1860, 1,9...
-Nebuchadnezzar
Nebuchadnezzar (on the Babylonian monuments, Nabu-kuduri-uzur), a Chaldean king of Babylon, born about 645 B. C, died in 561. He was the son of Nabopolassar, who toward the close of his reign sent him...
-Nebula
Nebula (Lat., mist, vapor), an aggregation of stars or stellar matter having the appearance, through an ordinary telescope, of a small, cloud-like patch of light. An enlargement of telescopic power us...
-Nebular Hypothesis
Nebular Hypothesis, the celebrated speculation of Sir William Herschel, adopted and developed by Laplace, assigning the genesis of the heavenly bodies to the gradual aggregation and condensation of a...
-The Necessity For A Cyclopaedia
Evert one that reads, every one that mingles in society, is constantly meeting with allusions to subjects on which he needs and desires further information. In conversation, in trade, in professional ...
-Necho, Or Neco
Necho, Or Neco (in the Bible also Pharaoh Necho, and in the hieroglyphics Neku), an Egyptian king of the 26th dynasty, who reigned, according to Rawlinson, from 610 to 594 B. C. He is called by Herodo...
-Necker
I. Jacques Jacques, a French statesman, born in Geneva, Switzerland, Sept. 30, 1732, died at Coppet, in the same country, April 9, 1804. After receiving a liberal education, he went to Paris at the a...
-Necromancy
Necromancy (Gr., from venp6g, dead, and fiavreia, divination), the art of obtaining knowledge of future events by consulting the spirits of the dead. From the treatise of Tertullian De Anima it appear...
-Necrosis
Necrosis (Gr. vkupwus, from vekpuv, to cauee to die), a term employed to denote the death or mortification of bony tissue. It bears the same relation to the bones that gangrene does to the soft parts;...
-Nectarine
Nectarine (Ital. nettarino). When the nectarine was introduced into cultivation, or whether it was known to the ancients, is not ascertained. It is simply a peach with a smooth skin (see Peach), and n...
-Nedjed, Or Nejd
Nedjed, Or Nejd, a country of central Arabia, the dominion of the sultan of the Wahabees, between lat. 19 20' and 29 W N., and Ion. 40 10' and 50 20' E., bounded N. by Shomer, E. b...
-Needle
Needle, a slender steel instrument, pointed at one end and with an eye at the other, used for carrying the thread in sewing. Among uncivilized people, at a very early period, rude attempts were made t...
-Negligence
Negligence, in law, primarily the want of care, caution, attention, diligence, skill, or discretion in the performance of an act by one having no positive intention to injure; and secondarily the omis...
-Negotiable Paper
In the article Exchange. Bill of, some of the general rules of the law of negotiable paper have been stated. In explanation of the central principle and foundation of this very peculiar system of law,...
-Negritos
Negritos, natives of the Philippine islands, usually classed with Papuans. They in a measure represent the people called negrillos by Dr. Pickering in his Races of Men (1848), where he classes the...
-Negro
Negro (Span, and Ital., from Lat. niger, black), a name properly applied to the races inhabiting the African continent, principally between lat. 10 N. and 20 S., and to their descendants in ...
-Nehemiah
Nehemiah, a Jewish governor of Judea under the Persians, and cup-bearer to King Artaxerxes Longimanus. He was the son of Hakaliah, received the surname or title of Tirshatha, and is the author of at l...
-Neilgherry Hills
Neilgherry Hills (Sansk. Nilgiri, blue mountains), a group of mountains in southern India, comparatively isolated from the other mountain systems of the country, hut connected by an elevated ridge wit...
-Nelson
I. A Central County Of Virginia A Central County Of Virginia, bordered S. E. by the James river and N. W. by the Blue Ridge, and drained by the Rock-fish, Rock, and Tye rivers; area, 340 sq. m.; pop....
-Nemaha
I. A S. E. County Of Nebraska A S. E. County Of Nebraska, separated from Missouri by the Missouri river, and intersected by the Little Nemaha; area, about 400 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 7,593. The surface...
-Nemean Games
Nemean Games, one of the four great national festivals of the Greeks, so called from Nemea in Argolis, where they were held every second year. The first one the date of which can be fixed approximatel...
-Nemesius- Bishop Of Emesa
Nemesius- Bishop Of Emesa, a Greek philosopher who flourished about 400. He has been identified by some writers with another Nemcsius, a friend of Gregory Nazianzen, and governor of Cappadocia. Nemesi...
-Neo-Platomsm
Neo-Platomsm, a system of philosophy and theosophy whose original seat was Alexandria, where it sprang up toward the end of the 2d century. Its founder was Ammonius Sac-cas, who was brought up by his ...
-Nepaiil
Nepaiil, an independent kingdom of India, bounded N. by the Himalaya mountains, which separate it from Thibet, E. by the British district of Darjeeling and the protected native state of Sikkim, and S....
-Neptune
Neptune (Neptunus; called by the Greeks Poseidon), in mythology, the principal god of the sea, and originally also of the rivers and springs. He was a son of Saturn and Rhea, and a brother of Jupiter,...
-Neptune (2)
Neptune, the most distant known planet, and the eighth in order of distance from the sun, omitting the asteroids. Neptune travels at a mean distance of about 2,745,998,000 m. from the sun. The eccentr...
-Nereis
Nereis, a marine divinity in Greek and Roman mythology, son of Pontus and Gaea (or, in the Roman myth, of Oceanus and Terra), and husband of Doris, who bore him 50 daughters, the Nereids. Nereus was r...
-Nereids
Nereids, the name of the sea centipedes of the dorsibranchiate order of annelids, of which the genus nereis (Cuv.) is one of the best known forms. The class and ordinal characters are given under Anne...
-Nero
Nero, a Roman emperor, born at Antium on the coast of Latium, probably Dec. 15, A. D. 37, died by his own hand, June 9, 68. He was the son of Cneius Domitius Ahenobarbus, by Agrippina, the sister of C...
-Nerve
Nerve (Gir. vevpov, a string or sinew), a white cord-like handle of filaments, distributed to asitive or contractile organs of the body, and capable of transmitting the nervous influence; so called be...
-Nerve Cell
Nerve Cell, a form of animal cell found in the gray nervous matter of the nervous centres (see Ganglion), and also in the peripheral expansion of some of the cranial nerves. Nerve cells are rounded or...
-Nervous System
One of the most important and remarkable characteristics that distinguish the physical organization of animals from that of plants, is the existence in the former of a peculiar tissue or substance cal...
-Nestor
Nestor, a legendary Grecian hero, son of Neleus and Chloris, and king of Messenian or of Triphylian Pylos. Previous to going to Troy he had taken part in wars with the Arcadians and Eleans, and in the...
-Nestorians
Nestorians, a sect of early Christians, so called after Nestorius, bishop of Constantinople in the 5th century. (See Nestorius.) They claim a still earlier origin, ascribing their conversion to the pr...
-Nestorus
Nestoru's, a Syrian bishop, born near the close of the 4th century, died in Libya about the year 440. He was a disciple of Theodore of Mopsuestia, became a presbyter of Anti-och, and was made patriarc...
-Netherlands, Or Low Countries
Netherlands, Or Low Countries (Dutch, Ne-derlanden; Fr. Pays-Btw), a country of western Europe, formerly comprising Belgium as well as the present kingdom of the Netherlands. The term is applied to th...
-Neuralgia
Neuralgia (Gr. vevpov, nerve, and alyoq, pain), an affection of which pain is the essential and characteristic feature, without visible alteration of the tissues or organs in which it is seated, and w...
-Neuroptera
Neuroptera (Gr. vevpov, nerve, and Trrepdv, wing), an order of insects characterized by powerful jaws, four reticulated, membranous, naked wings, and the absence of sting or piercer. They include the ...
-Neusiedler Lake
Neusiedler Lake (Hung. Ferto), after Balaton the largest lake of Hungary, situated near the Austrian frontier on the confines of the counties of Oedenburg and Wieselburg; length about 23 m., breadth 7...
-Neutrality
Neutrality, in international law, the indifferent and impartial posture maintained by one nation with regard to others which are at war. The neutral state, says Klüber, is neither judge nor party...
-Neuwied
Neuwied, a town of Rhenish Prussia, on the right bank of the Rhine, 6 m. N. W. of Cob-Jentz; pop. in 1872, 8,664, chiefly Protestants. there are about 400 Moravians, whose extensive establishments hav...
-Nevada
Nevada, one of the western states of the American Union, the 23d admitted under the constitution, situated between lat. 35 and 42 K, and Ion. 114 and 120 W.; extreme length N. and ...
-Nevis
Nevis, an island of the British West Indies, in the Leeward group, 2 m. from the S. E. extremity of St. Christopher, in lat. 17 14' N., Ion. 62 40' W.; area, 45 sq. m.; pop. in 1871, 11,735....
-New Albany
New Albany, a city, port of delivery, and the capital of Floyd co., Indiana, on the Ohio river, 2 m. below the falls, and opposite the W. end of Louisville, Kv., 100 m. S. of Indianapolis; pop. in 185...
-New Bedford
New Bedford, a city, port of entry, and one of the capitals of Bristol co., Mass., in lat. 41 38' N., lon. 70 55' W., 50 m. S. by E. of Boston; pop. in 1870, 21,300. The municipal limits emb...
-New Berne, Or Newbern
New Berne, Or Newbern, a city and the capital of Craven co., North Carolina, the port of entry of the district of Pamlico, on the S. W. bank of the river Neuse at its confluence with the Trent, 40 m. ...
-New Britain
New Britain, the name of one large and several smaller islands in the Pacific ocean, between lat. 4 and 6 30' S., and lon. 148 and 152 30' E.; extreme length of the large island ab...
-New Brunswick
New Brunswick, a province of the Dominion of Canada, situated between lat. 44 35' and 48 5' N., and lon. 63 47' and 69 5' W.; average length N. and S. 180 m., average breadth 150 m...
-New Caledonia
New Caledonia (called Balacle by the natives), an island of Australasia belonging to France, in the S. Pacific, between lat. 20 and 22 30' S., and Ion. 164 and 167 E.; length from ...
-New Castle
New Castle, a N. county of Delaware, bordering on Pennsylvania, bounded E. by Delaware river and bay, which separate it from New Jersey, and drained by Brandywine, Christiana, and other creeks; area, ...
-New Hampshire
New Hampshire, one of the thirteen original states of the American Union, bounded N. by the province of Quebec, Canada, E. by Maine and the Atlantic, S. by Massachusetts, and W. by Vermont, from which...
-New Haven
New Haven, a S. county of Connecticut, on Long Island sound, bounded W. by the Housa-tonic river, and drained by the Naugatuck, Quinepiack, and other streams; area, 640 sq. m.; pop. in 1870, 121,257. ...
-New Hebrides
New Hebrides, a group of volcanic islands in the S. Pacific ocean, N. E. of New Caledonia, between lat. 13 15' and 20 10' S., and Ion. 166 30' and 170 10' E.; area, about 5,700 sq....
-New Iiayen
New Iiayen, a town, city, and port of entry of New Haven co., Connecticut, capital of the county and the largest city in the state, situated at the head of New Haven bay or harbor, 4 m. from Long Isla...
-New Ireland
New Ireland, an island in the S. Pacific ocean, between lat. 2 and 5 S., and Ion. 150 30' and 153 E. It is separated from New Britain on the southwest by St. George's channel, and ...
-New Jersey
New Jersey, one of the thirteen original states of the American Union, situated between lat. 38c 56' and 41 21' X., and Ion. 73 54' and 75 33' W.; extreme length 167 m., average breadth 50 m...
-New Jersey Tea
New Jersey Tea, the most common name for ceanothua Americans, which is also called, in common with several other plants, red-root. The genus eeanothus (a name of unknown meaning), belonging to the buc...
-New Jerusalem
New Jerusalem, the name applied in Rev. xxi. 2 to the city which John saw coming down from God out of heaven. Emanuel Sweden-borg interprets this symbol as signifying the new church whose doctrines he...
-New Lebanon
New Lebanon, a town of Columbia co., New York, bordering on Massachusetts, on the Harlem Extension railroad, 20 m. E. S. E. of Albany; pop. in 1870, 2,124. In the E. part is a large Shaker settlement ...
-New London
New London, a S. E. county of Connecticut, on Long Island sound, bordering on Rhode Island, bounded E. partly by the Pawcatuck and W. by the Connecticut river, and drained by the Thames river; area, a...
-New Mexico
New Mexico, a territory of the United States, situated between lat. 31 20' and 37 N., and lon. 103 and 109 W.; length on the E. boundary 345 m., and on the W. boundary 300 m.; aver...
-New Orleans
New Orleans (Fr. La Muvelle Orleans), the capital, chief city, and commercial metropolis of Louisiana, the ninth city of the United States in point of population, nearly coextensive with the parish of...
-New South Wales
New South Wales, a British colony occupying the S. E. part of Australia, stretching along the S. Pacific ocean from Cape Howe to Point Danger, bounded N. by the colony of Queensland, E. by the Pacific...
-New Tear's Day
New Tear's Day, the first day of the year. Ancient and modern civilized peoples, while differing as to the day from which they reckoned the beginning of the civil year (see Year), have agreed in disti...
-New Westminster
New Westminster, a city and till 1867 the capital of British Columbia, on the N. bank of Fraser river, 15 m. above its mouth in the gulf of Georgia, and 65 m. N. N. E. of Victoria; lat. 49 13' N....
-New York
New York, one of the thirteen original states of the American Union, and one of the middle states, situated between lat. 40 29' 40 and 45 o' 42 N, and lon. 71 51' and 79 45' 54 W.: e...
-New York (2)
New York, a city of the state of New York, coextensive with the county of the same name, the commercial metropolis of the United States, and the most populous city in the western hemisphere, situated ...









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