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Inquire Within Fob Anything You Want To Know Or, Over Three Thousand Seven Hundred Facts Worth Knowing | by Robert Kemp Philip



A book for family reference on all subjects connected with domestic economy, and containing the largest and most valuable collection of useful information that has ever yet been published.

TitleFacts Worth Knowing
AuthorRobert Kemp Philip
PublisherGarrett, Dick & Fitzgerald
Year1859
Copyright1856, Garrett, Dick & Fitzgerald
AmazonInquire Within for Anything You Want to Know

Inquire Within For Anything You Want To Know Or, Over Three Thousand Seven Hundred Facts Worth Knowing.

Inquire Within For Anything You Want To KNOW;
-Preface
The title of this work will, in a slight degree, indicate its purpose; still, in presenting it to the public, we would offer a few remarks as to our plan. In accordance with our design, we have place...
-Who Abides There
Inquire Within is decidedly the most wonderful and useful book that has been issued for many years. It should be in the hands of every family in the country, as it gives a vast amount of information...
-Choice Of Articles Of Food
Nothing is more important In the affairs of housekeeping than the choice of wholesome food. We have been amused by a conundrum which is as follows: - A man went to market and bought two fish. When he...
-Choice Of Articles Of Food. Continued
14. Mutton The meat should be arm and close in grain, and red in colour, the fat white and firm. Mutton is in its prime when the sheep is about five years old, though it is often killed much younger....
-27. To Clean Black Cloth Clothes
Clean the garments in a boiler or copper containing two or three gallons of water, for half an hour. Dip the clothes in warm water, and squeeze dry; then put them into the copper and boil for half an...
-28. Prevention Of Fires
The following simple suggestions are worthy of observation: Add one ounce of alum to the last water used to rinse children's dresses, and they will be rendered uninflammable, or so slightly combustibl...
-29. Camphor Balls To Prevent Chaps
Melt three drachms of spermaceti, four drachms of white wax, with one ounce of almond oil, and stir in three drachms of camphor (previously powdered by moistening it with a little spirits of wine); po...
-30. Castor Oil Pomade
Castor oil, four ounces; prepared lard, two ounces; white wax, two drachms; bergamot, two drachms; oil of laven-den, twenty drops. Melt the fat together, and on cooling, add the scents, and stir till ...
-31. Mutton Pie
The following is a capital family dish: - Cut mutton into pieces about two inches square and half an inch thick; mix pepper, pounded allspice, and salt together; dip the pieces in this; sprinkle stale...
-32. Moths (To Get Rid Of Them)
1. Procure shavings of cedar-wood, and enclose in muslin bags, which should be distributed freely among the clothes. - 2. Procure shavings of camphor-wood, and enclose in bags - 3. Sprinkle pimento (a...
-33. Pains In The Head And Face
A friend assures us that he was cured of a severe attack of tic doloreux by the following simple remedy: - Take half a pint of rose water, add two teaspoonfuls of white vinegar, to form a lotion. Appl...
-34. Cold Cream
No. 1. Oil of almonds, one pound; white wax, four ounces. Melt together gently in an earthen vessel, and when nearly cold, stir in gradually twelve ounces of rose water. No. 2. White wax and s...
-35. Night Lights
Field's and Child's night lights are generally known and are easily obtainable. But under circumstances where they cannot be procured, the waste of candles may be thus applied: Make a fine cotton, and...
-36. Ginger Cakes
To two pounds of flour add three-quarters of a pound of good moist sugar, one ounce best Jamaica ginger well mixed in the flour; have ready three-quarters of a pound of lard, melted, and four eggs wel...
-37. The Hands
Take a wine-glassful of eau de Cologne, and another of lemon-juice: then scrape two cakes of brown Windsor soap to a powder, and mix well in a mould. When hard, it will be an excellent soap for whiten...
-38. To Whiten The Nails
Diluted sulphuric acid, two drachms tincture of myrrh, one drachm; spring water, four ounces; mix. First cleanse with white soap, and then dip the fin gers into the mixture. A good hand is one of the ...
-39. Rhubarb To Preserve
Peel one pound of the finest rhubarb, and cut it into pieces of two inches in length, and three-quarters of a pound of white sugar, and the rind and juice of one lemon - the rind to be cut into narrow...
-40. Half-Pay Pudding
An officer's wife is the contributor of the following: - Four ounces of each of the following ingredients, viz., suet, flour, currants, raisins, and bread crumbs; two tablespoonfuls of treacle, half a...
-41. Dr. Kitchener's Rules For Marketing
The best rule for marketing is to pay ready money for everything, and to deal with the most respectable tradesmen in your neighbourhood. If you leave it to their integrity to supply you with a good ar...
-42. Cleaning Silks, Satins, Coloured Woolen Dresses, Etc
Four ounces of soft soap, four ounces of honey, the white of an egg, and a wine-glassful of gin; mix well together, and the article to be scoured with a rather hard brush thoroughly, afterwards rinse ...
-43. Sponge Cake
A lady, or, as the newspapers say, a correspondent upon whom we can confidently rely, favours us with the following simple receipt, which, she says, gives less trouble than any other, and has never ...
-44. Bed Clothes
The perfection of dress, for day or night, where warmth is the purpose, is that which confines around the body sufficient of its own warmth, while it allows escape to the exhalations of the skin. Wher...
-45. Orange Marmalade
Choose the largest Seville oranges, as they usually contain the greatest quantity of juice, and choose them with clear skins, as the skins form the largest part of the marmalade. Weigh the oranges, an...
-46. Impressions From Prints
The print is soaked first in a solution of potash, and then in one of tartaric acid. This produces a perfect diffusion of crystals in bi-tartrate of potash, through the texture of the unprinted part o...
-47. Hooping-Cough
Dissolve a scruple of salt of tartar in a quarter pint of water; add to it ten grains of cochineal; sweeten it with sugar. Give to an infant a fourth part of a table-spoonful four times a day; two yea...
-Food In Season
There is an old maxim, A place for everything, and everything in its place. To which we beg to add another, A season for everything, and everything in season. 48. January [Those Fish, Poultry, e...
-Food In Season. Part 2
54. July Fish. - Cod, crabs, flounders, herrings, lobsters, mackerel, perch, pike, salmon, trout, blue-fish, black-fish, bass, pickerel, cat-fish, eels, clams, porgies. Meat. - Beef, grass-lamb, mut...
-Food In Season. Part 3
56. September Fish. - Cockles, cod, crabs, eels, flounders, lobsters, oysters, perch, pike, shrimps, porgies, black-fish, week-fish Meat. - Beef, mutton, pork, veal buck-venison. Poultry and Game...
-60. To Soften The Skin And Improve The Complexion
If flowers of sulphur be mixed in a little of milk, and after standing an hour or two, the milk (without disturbing the sulphur) be rubbed into the skin it will keep it soft, and make the complexion c...
-61. Hints About Making Preserves
It is not generally known, that boiling fruit a long time, and skimming it well, without the sugar, and without a cover to the preserving-pan, is a very economical and excellent way - economical, beca...
-62. Lemon Rice
Boil sufficient rice in milk, with white sugar to taste, till it is soft; put it into a pint basin or an earthenware blancmange mould, and leave it till cold. Peel a lemon very thick, cut the peel int...
-63. Mouth Glue
A very useful preparation is sold by many of the law stationers under this title; it is nerely a thin cake of soluble glue (four inches by one and a half), which, when moistened with the tongue, furni...
-64. Soda Water Powders
A pleasant, cooling, summer drink. The blue paper contains carbonate of soda, thirty grains; the white paper tartaric acid, twenty-five grains. Directions. - Dissolve the contents of the blue paper i...
-65. Method Of Preserving Mackerel, So That It Will Keep And Be Excellent For Months
Mackerel, being at certain times exceedingly plentiful (especially to those who live near the coast), so much so indeed as to become almost a drug at such seasons, may be pre served to make an excelle...
-66. Liquid Glue
Dissolve one ounce ot borax in a pint of boiling water; ad i two ounces of shellac, and boil in a covered vessel until the lac is dissolved. This forms a very useful and cheap cement; it answers well ...
-67. Rose Lip Salve
No. 1. Oil of almonds, three ounces; alkanet, half an ounce. Let them stand together in a warm place until the oil is coloured, then strain. Melt one ounce and a half of white-wax, and half an ounce o...
-68. Walking
To walk gracefully, the body must be erect, but not stiff, and the head held up in such a posture that the eyes are directed forward. The tendency of untaught walkers is to look towards the ground nea...
-69. Lemon And Kali, Or Sherbet
Large quantities of this wholesome and refreshing preparation are manufactured and consumed every summer; it is sold in bottles, and also as a beverage, made by dissolving a large tea-spoonful in a tu...
-70. Waterproofing For Boots And Shoes
Linseed oil, one pint; oil of turpentine, or cam-phine, a quarter of a pint; yellow wax, a quarter of a pound; Burgundy pitch, a quarter of a pound. To be melted together with a gentle heat, and when ...
-71. My Wife's Little Tea Parties
My wife is celebrated for her little tea parties; not tea parties alone - but dinner parties, picnic parties, music parties, supper parties - in fact, she is the life and soul of all parties, which is...
-72. Nice Plum Cake
One pound of flour, quarter of a pound of butter, quarter of a pound of sugar, quarter of a pound of currants, three eggs, half a pint of milk, and a small tea-spoonful of carbonate of soda. The above...
-73. Gingerbread Snaps
One pound of flour, half a pound of treacle, half a pound of sugar, quarter of a pound of butter, half an ounce of best prepared ginger, sixteen drops of essence of lemon, potash the size of a nut, di...
-74. Drop Cakes
One pint of flour, half a pound of butter, quarter of a pound of pounded lump sugar half a nutmeg grated, a handful of currants, two eggs, and a large pinch of carbonate of soda, or volatile salts To ...
-75. A Very Excellent And Cheap Cake
Two pounds and a half of flour, three quarters of a pound of gar, three-quarters of a pound of butter, half a pound of currants, or quarter of a pound of raisins, quarter of a pound of orange peel, tw...
-77. Muffins
Add a pint and a nalf of good ale yeast (from pale malt, if possible) to a bushel of the very best white flour; let the yeast lie all night in water, then pour off the water quite clear; make two gall...
-78. Diamond Cement
Seak isinglass in water - till it is soft, then dissolve it in the smallest possible quantity of proof spirit, by the aid of a gentle heat; in two ounces of this mixture dissolve ten grains of ammonia...
-79. Ginger Beer
The following recipe for making a very superior ginger-beer is taken from the celebrated treatise of Dr. Pereira, on diet The honey gives it a peculiar softness and from not being fermented with yeast...
-80. Phosphorus Paste For Destroying Rats And Mice
Melt one pound of lard with a very gentle heat in a bottle or glass flask plunged into warm water; then add half an ounce of phosphorus, and one pint of proof spirit; cork the bottle securely, and as ...
-81. Inks
There are many recipes published for making ink; the following is as useful and economical a mode of producing good ink as any of them: - 82. Dr. Ure's Ink For twelve gallons of ink take twelve poun...
-87. Brunswick Black For Varnishing Grates
Melt four pounds of common asphaltum, and add two pints of linseed oil and one gallon of oil of turpentine. This is usually put up in stoneware bottles for sale, and is used with a paint brush. If too...
-88. Banbury Cakes
Rollout the paste about half an inch thick, and cut it into pieces, then roll again till each piece becomes twice the size; put some Banbury meat in the middle of one side, fold the other over it, and...
-89. Red Currant Jelly
With three parts of fine, ripe, red currants, mix one of white currants; put them into a clean preserving-pan, and stir them gently over a clear fire until the juice flows from them freely; then turn ...
-90. Indications Of Whole Some Mushrooms
Whenever a fungus is pleasant in flavour and odour it may be considered whole-some if, on the contrary, it have an offensive smell, a bitter, astringent, or styptic taste, or even if it leave an unple...
-91. Gum Arabic Starch
Get two ounces of fine white gum arabic, and pound it to powder. Next put it into a pitcher, and pour on it a pint or more of boiling water (according to the degree of strength you desire), and then h...
-92. Seidlitz Powders
Seidlitz powders are usually put up in two papers. The larger blue paper cootain3 tartarized soda (also called Ro-chelle salt) two drachms, and carbonate of soda two scruples; in practice it will be f...
-93. Meat Cakes
Take any cold meat, game, or poultry (if under-done, all the better), mince it fine, with a little fat bacon or ham, or an anchovy; season it with a little pepper and salt; mix well, and make it into ...
-94. Oyster Patties
Roll out puff paste a quarter of an inch thick, cut it into squares with a knife, sheet eight or ten patty pans, put upon each a bit of bread the size of halt* a walnut; roll out another layer of past...
-95. Lobster Patties
Prepare the patties as in the last receipt. Take a hen lobster already boiled - pick the meat from the tail and claws, and chop it fine; put it into a stew-pan with a lit* tie of the inside spawn poun...
-96. Egg And Ham Patties
Cut a slice of bread two inches thick, from the most solid part of a stale quartern loaf; have ready a tin round cutter two inches diameter, cut out four or five pieces, then take a cutter two sizes s...
-97. Veal And Ham Patties
Chop about six ounces of ready-dressed lean veal, and three ounces of ham very small, put it into a stew-pan with an ounce of butter rolled in flour, half a gill of cream, half a gill of veal stock, a...
-98. Puff Paste
To a pound and a quarter of sifted flour rub gently in with the hand half a pound of fresh but-ter; mix up with half a pint of spring water; knead it well, and set it by for a quarter of an hour; then...
-99. Paste For Meat Or Savoury Pies
Sift two pounds of fine flour to one and a-halfof good salt butter, break it into small pieces, and wash it well in cold water; rub gently together the butter and flour, and mix it up with the yolks o...
-100. Chicken And Ham Patties
Use the white meat from the breast of the chickens or fowls, and proceed as for veal and ham patties. ...
-101. - Prime Beef Sausages
Take a pound of lean beef, and half a pound of suet, clean from the skin, - chop it fine as for mince collop, then beat it well with a roller, or in a marble mortar, till it is all well mixed and will...
-102. Potato Puffs
Take cold roast meat, either beef or mutton, or veal and ham, clear it from the gristle, cut it small, and season either with zest or pepper and salt, and cut pickles - boil and mash some potatoes, an...
-103. Fried Eggs And Minced Ham Or Bacon
Choose some very fine bacon streaked with a good deal of lean; cut this into very thin slices, and afterwards into small square pieces; throw them into a stew-pan, and set it over a gentle fire, that ...
-105. - Marbled Goose
The following, though scarcely pertaining to My Wife's Little Suppers, is too delicious a relish to be overlooked. It is suitable for larger supper parties, or as a stock dish for families where vis...
-106. Oyster Pie
The following directions may be safely relied upon. Take a large dish, butter it, and spread a rich paste over the sides and round the edge, but not at the bottom. The oysters should be fresh, and as ...
-107. Salad
This is a point of proficiency which it is easy to attain with care. The main point is, to incorporate the several articles required for the sauce, and to serve up at table as fresh as possible. The h...
-308. Use Of Fruit
Instead of standing in any fear of a generous consumption of ripe fruits, we regard them as positively conducive to health. The very maladies commonly assumed to have their origin in the free use of a...
-109. Daughters
Mothers, who wish not only to discharge well their own duties in the domestic circle, but to train up their daughters at a later day to make happy and comfortable firesides for their families, should ...
-110. Servants
There are frequent complaints that, in these days servants are bad, and apprentices are bad, and dependants and aiding hands generally are bad. It may be so. But if it is so,what is the inference? In ...
-111. How to Make Good Butter
Milk should never be set for butter in a dark, damp cella - as in the case with butter makers in this section - as the cream is thereby moulded before it has had time to rise, which gives the butter a...
-112. Black Currant Jelly
To each pound of picked fruit, allow one gill of water; set them on the fire in the preserving-pan to scald, but do not let them boil; bruise them well with a silver fork, or wooden beater,- take them...
-113. Bread (Cheap And Excellent Kind)
Simmer slowly, over a gentle fire, a pound of rice in three quarts of water, till the rice has become perfectly soft, and the water has either evaporated or imbibed by the rice: let it become cool, bu...
-114. Economical And Nourishing Bread
Suffer the miller to remove from the flour only the coarse flake bran. Of this bran boil five or six pounds in four and a-half gallons of water; when the goodness is extracted from the bran, during wh...
-115. Scouring Drops For Removing Grease
There are several preparations of this name; one of the best is made as follows: Cam-phene, or spirits of turpentine, three ounces; essence of lemon, one ounce; mix. ...
-116. Pomatums
For making pomatums, the lard, fat, suet, or marrow used, must be carefully prepared by being melted with as gentle a heat as possible, skimmed, strained, and cleared from the dregs which are deposite...
-119. Pickling Eggs
If the following pickle were generally known it would be more generally used. We constantly keep it in our family, and find it an excellent pickle to be eaten with cold meat, etc. The eggs should be b...
-120. White Currant Jelly
White currant jelly is made in the same way as red currant jelly, only it should have double-refined sugar, and not be boiled above ten minutes. White currant jelly should be put through a lawn sieve!...
-122. Potatoes
We are all potato eaters (for ourselves we esteem potatoes beyond any other vegetable), jet few persons know how to cook them. Shall we be bold enough to commence our hints by presuming to inform our ...
-136. Ginger-Beer Powders
Blue paper: Carbonate of soda, thirty grains; powdered ginger, five grains; ground white sugar, one drachm to one drachm and a-half; essence of lemon, one drop. Add the essence to the sugar, then the ...
-137. - Apple Bread
A very light pleasant bread is made in France by a mixture of apples and flour, in the proportion of one of the former to two of the latter. The usual quantity of yeast is employed as in making common...
-138. To Make Anchovies
Procure a quantity of sprats, as fresh as possible; do not wash or wipe them, but just take them as caught, and for every peck of the fish take two pounds of common salt, quarter of a pound of bay-sal...
-139. Cement For Broken China, Glass
Cement For Broken China, Glass, etc - The following recipe, from experience, we know to be A good one, and, being nearly colourless, it possesses advantages which liquid glue and other cements do not:...
-140. Significations Of Names
Aaron, Hebrew, a mountain. Abel, Hebrew, vanity. Abraham, Hebrew, the father of many. Adam, Hebrew, red earth. Adolphus, Saxon, happiness and help. Albert, Saxon, all bright. Alexander, Greek, a...
-141. Blacking (Paste)
Half a pound of ivory black, half a pound of treacle, half an ounce of powdered alum,one drachm of turpentine, one ounce of sulphuric acid, and two ounces of raw linseed oil. The ivory black and treac...
-142. Succedaneum
Take an old silver thimble, an old silver coin, or other silver article, and with a very fine file, convert it into filings. Sift through gauze, to separate the coarse from the fine particles. Take th...
-143. Lemons, Whole, For Dessert
Take six fine, fresh, well-shaped lemons, cut a hole just round the stock, and with a narrow spoon scoop out the pippins, and press out the juice, but leave the pulp in the lemons. Put them into a bow...
-144. The Teeth
Dissolve two oz. borax in three pints of water; be-fore quite cold, add thereto one tea-spoonful of tincture of myrrh and one tablespoonful of spirits of camphor; bottle the mixture for use. One wineg...
-147. Compounds To Promote The Growth Of Hair
When the hair falls off from diminished action of the scalp, preparations of cantharides often prove useful; they are sold under the names of Dupuy-tren's Pomade, Cazenaze's Pomade, etc. The following...
-151. Medicines (Aperient)
In the spring time of the year the Judicious use of aperient medicines is much to be commended. 152. Spring Aperients For children nothing is better than: 1. -Brimstone and treacle;to each tea-cupfu...
-158. Medicine Weights And Measures
All medicines are mixed by apothecaries' weight: this must be carefully borne in mind, as the apothecaries' drachm is more than double that of avoirdupois or the common weights. A set of the proper we...
-159. Method Of Curing The Stings Of Bees And Wasps
The sting of a bee is generally more virulent than that of a wasp, and with some people attended with very violent effects. The sting of a bee is barbed at the end, and, consequently, always left in t...
-160. Preserved Plums
Cut your plums in half (they must not be quite ripe), and take out the stones Weigh the plums, and allow a pound of loaf-sugar to a pound of fruit. Crack the stones, take out the kernels, and break th...
-161. Evening Amusements With Cards
Playing at cards, or any other game, for money or anything else of value, is a practice to be reprobated; but fir pleasant amusement at an evening party, cards are extremely attractive. Raphael intro...
-Of The Court Of Cards
The Kings represent Males according to the complexion. The Queens represent Females in like manner. The Knaves, the Thoughts of the respective parties. Therefore, as example, suppose nine cards bein...
-162. To Make Gingerbread Cake
Take one pound and a-half of treacle, one and a-half ounces of ground ginger, half an ounce of carra-way seeds, two ounces of allspice, four ounces of orange peel, shred fine;half a pound sweet butter...
-163. Honey Water
Rectified spirits eight ounces; oil of cloves, oil of bergamot, oil of lavender, of each half a drachm; musk three grains; yellow sanders shavings, four drachms. Digest for eight days; add two ounces ...
-164. A Cure For Burns And Scalds
Four ounces of powdered alum put into a pint of cold water. A piece of rag to be dipped into this liquid, to be applied to the burn or scald - frequently changed during the day. This is a rapid cure. ...
-165. A Cure For Weak And Sore Eyes
Sulphate of zinc three grains, tincture of opium ten drops, water two ounces. To be applied three or four times a-day. ...
-166. Pills For Gout And Rheumatism
Acetic extract of colchicum two grains, powdered ipeca cuanha four grains, compound extract of colocynth half a drachm, blue pill four grains. Divide into twelve pills; one to be taken night and morni...
-167. A Mixture For A Bad Cold And Cough
Solution of acetate of ammonia two ounces, ipecacuanha wine two drachms, antimony wine two drachms, solution of muriate of morphine half a drachm, treacle four drachms; water add eight ounces. Take tw...
-168. True Indian Curry Powder
Turmeric four ounces, coriander seeds eleven ounces, cayenne half an ounce, black pepper five ounces, pimento two ounces, cloves half an ounce, cinnamon three ounces, ginger two ounces, cumin seeds th...
-169. Liquid For The Cure And Prevention Of Baldness
Eau de Cologne two ounces, tincture of cantharides two drachms, oil of rosemary, oil of nutmeg, and oil of lavender, each ten drops. To be rubbed on the bald part of the head every night. (Sec 147.) ...
-170. Cure For Toothache
Two or three drops of essential oil of cloves, put upon a small piece of lint or cotton wool, and placed in the hollow of the tooth, which will he found to have the active power of curing the toothach...
-171. Lavender Water
Es-sence of musk four drachms, essence of ambergris four drachms, oil of cinnamon ten drops, English lavender six drachms, oil of geranium two drachms, spirits of wine twenty ounces. To be all mixed t...
-172. Lotion For Freckles
Muriate of ammonia, half a drachm; lavender water, two drachms; distilled water, half a pint. Applied with a sponge two or three times a day. ...
-173. American Tooth Powder
Coral, cuttle fish-bone, dragon's blood, of each eight drachms; burnt alum and red ganders, of each four drachms; orris root, eight drachms; cloves and cinnamon, of each half a drachm; vanilla, eleven...
-175. How To Take Marking Ink Out Of Linen
A saturated solution of cyanuret of potassium, applied with a camel's-hair brush. After the marking ink disappears, the linen should be well washed in cold water. 176. How To Take Ink Out Of Boards ...
-178. A Positive Cure For Corns
The strongest acetic acid, applied night and morning with a camel's-hair brush. In one week the corn will disappear. Soft or hard corns. ...
-179. Pastils For Burning
Cascarilla bark, eight drachms; gum benzoin, four drachms; yellow sanders, two drachms; styrax, two drachms; olibanum, two drachms; charcoal, six ounces; nitre, one drachm and a-half, mucilage of trag...
-180. Pills For A Bad Cough
Compound ipecacuanhae powder, half a drachm; fresh dried squills, ten grains; ammoniacum, ten grains; sulphate of quinine, six grains; treacle, sufficient quantity to make a mass. Divide into twelve p...
-181. Blacking
Blacking is now always made with ivory black, treacle, linseed or sweet oil, and oil of vitriol. The proportions vary in the different directions, and a variable quantity of water is added, as paste o...
-186. Black Reviver For Black Cloth
Bruised galls one pound, logwood two pounds, green vitriol half a pound, water five quarts. Boil for two hours, and strain. Used to restore the colour of black cloth. ...
-187. Liquid For Preserving Furs From Moth
Warm water, one pint; corrosive sublimate, twelve grains. If washed with this, and afterwards dried, furs are safe from moth. Care should taken to label the liquid - poison. ...
-188. French Polishes
1. Naptha Polish. - Shellac, three pounds; wood naptha, three quarts. 180. 2. Spirit Polish. - Shellac, two pounds; powdered mastic and sandarac, of each one ounce; copal varnish, half a pint; spirit...
-190. Brilliant Whitewash
Many have heard of the brilliant stucco whitewash on the east end of the President's house at Washington. The following is a receipt for it; it is gleaned from the National Intelligencer, with some ad...
-191. Husband And Wife
Being hints to each other for the good of both, as actually delivered at our own table: - 192. Hints For Wives If your husband occasionally looks a little troubled when he comes home, do not say to ...
-191. Husband And Wife. Part 2
195. Hints For Husbands You can hardly imagine how refreshing it is to occasionally call up the recollection of your courting days. How tediously the hours rolled away prior to the appointed time of ...
-191. Husband And Wife. Part 3
198. Hints For Wives It was! It was not! It was!' It was not! Ah! Ha! - Now who's the wiser or the better for this contention for the last word? Does obstinacy establish superiority, or ...
-191. Husband And Wife. Part 4
201. Hints For Husbands Cus-tom entitles you to be considered the lord and master over your household But don't assume the master and sink the lord. Remember that noble gener-osity, forbearance, ...
-203. Hints For Home Comforts
A short needle makes the most expedition in plain sewing. When you are particular in wishing to have precisely what you want from a butcher's, go and purchase it yourself. One flannel petticoat will...
-203. Hints For Home Comforts. Continued
We know not of anything attended with more serious consequences than that of sleeping in damp linen. Persons are frequently assured that they have been at a fire for many hours, but the question is as...
-204. Cookeky For Children
205. Food For An Infant Take of fresh cow's milk, one tablespoonful, and mix with two tablespoonfuls of hot water;Bweeteu with loaf-sugar as much as may be agreeable. This quantity is sufficient for ...
-219. Fruits For Children
That fruits are naturally healthy in their season, if rightly taken, no one who believes that the Creator is a kind and beneficent Being can doubt. And yet the use of summer fruits appears often to ca...
-221. Blackberry Jam
Gather the fruit in dry weather;allow half a pound of good brown sugar to every pound of fruit; boil the whole together gently for an hour, or till the blackberries are soft, stirring and mashing them...
-222. To Make Senna And Manna Palatable
Take half an ounce, when mixed, senna and manna; put in half a pint of boiling water;when the strength is abstracted, pour into the liquid from a quarter to half a pound of prunes and two large tables...
-223. Statistics Of The Bible
The Bible contains 3,566,480 letters; 810,697 words; 31,173 verses; 1,189 chapters; 66 books. The word and 46,227 times;the word reverend only once, which is the 9th verse of the 11 th Psalm;the word ...
-224. Roche's Embrocation For Hooping Cough
Olive oil, two ounces; oil of amber, one ounce;oil of cloves, one drachm. Mix. To be rubbed on the chest at bed-time. ...
-225. A Black Man's Recipe To Dress Rice
Wash him well, much wash in cold water, the rice flour make him stick. Water boil all ready very fast. Throw him in, rice can't burn, water shake him too much. Boil quarter of an hour or little more;r...
-226. Cements
The term cement includes all those substances employed for the purpose of causing the adhesion of two or more bodies, whether originally separate, or divided by an accidental fracture. As the substanc...
-226. Cements. Part 2
Mouth Glue 227. Mouth Glue affords a very convenient means of uniting papers, and other small light objects; it is made by dissolving by the aid of heat, pure glue, as parchment glue, or gelatine, wi...
-226. Cements. Part 3
Lime and Egg Cement 231. Lime and Egg Cement is frequently made by moistening the edges to be united with white of egg, dusting on some lime from a piece of muslin, and bringing the edges into contac...
-233. Economical Dish
Cut some pretty fat ham or bacon into slices, and fry of a nice brown; lay them aside to keep warm;then mix equal quantities of potatoes and cabbage, bruised well together, and fry them in the fat lef...
-234. Curry Powder
Take two ounces of turmeric, 6ix ounces of coriander seed, half an ounce of powdered ginger, two drachms of cinnamon, six drachms of cayenne pepper, four drachms of black pepper, one drachm of mace an...
-236. Names And Situations Of The Joints
In different parts of the kingdom the method of cutting up carcases varies. That which we describe below is the most general, and is known as the English method. Beef - Fore Quarter. - Fore rib(five ...
-238. II. Relative. Economy of the Meat Joints
The round is, in large families, one of the most profitable parts. It is usually boiled, and like most of the boiling parts of beef, is generally sold less than roasting joints. The brisket is also a...
-239. III. Cooking Meat
Ten pounds of beef require from two hours to two hours and a-half roasting, eighteen inches from a good clear fire. Six pounds require one hour and a-quarter to one hour and a-half, fourteen inches f...
-239. III. Cooking Meat. Continued
The loss by roasting varies, according to Professor Donovan, from 14 3-5ths to nearly double that rate, per cent. The average loss on roasting butcher's meat is 22 per cent; and on domestic poultry is...
-240. Almond Flavour
Essence of Peach Kernels. - Quint-essence of Noyeau. - Dissolve one ounce of essential oil of bitter almonds in one pint of spirits of wine. Used as flavouring for cordials, and perfuming pastry. In l...
-241. Freezing Without Ice Or Acids
The use of ice in cooling depends upon the fact of its requiring a vast quantity of heat to convert it from a solid into a liquid state, or, in other words, to melt it, and the heat so required it obt...
-241. Freezing Without Ice Or Acids. Continued
Another substance, which is free from any corrosive action or unpleasant odour, is the nitrate of ammonia, which, if simply dissolved in rather less than its own weight of water, reduces the temperatu...
-242. Recipes For The Manufacture Of Dessert Ices, Both Cream And Water
243. Strawberry Ice Cream Take one pint of strawberries, one pint of cream, nearly half a pound of powdered white sugar, the juice of a lemon; mash the fruit through a sieve, and take out the seeds:...
-250. The Art Of Being Agreeable
The true art of being agreeable is to appear well pleased with all the company, and rather to seem well entertained with them than to bring entertainment to them. A man thus disposed, perhaps, may not...
-251. Destruction Of Rats
The following recipe for the destruction of rats has been communicated by Dr. Uro to the council of the English Agricultural Society, and is highly recommended as the best known means of getting rid o...
-252. Almond Pudding And Sauce
A large cupful of finely-minced beef suet, a teacupful of milk, four ounces of bread-crumbs, four ounces of well-cleaned currants, two ounces of almonds, half a pound of stoned raisins, three well-bea...
-253. Stewed Water-Cress
The following receipt may be new, and will be found an agreeable and wholesome dish:-Lay the cress in strong salt and water, to clear it from insects. Pick and wash nicely, and stew it in water for ab...
-254. To Loosen Glass Stoppers Of Bottles
(See 3063.) - With a feather rub a drop or two of salad oil round the stopper, close to the mouth of the bottle or decanter, which must be then placed before the fire, at the distance of about eightee...
-255. Economical Family Pudding
Bruise with a wooden spoon, through a colander, six large or twelve middle-sized boiled potatoes; beat four eggs, mix with a pint of good milk, stir in the potatoes;sugar and seasoning to taste;butter...
-256. Parsnip Wine
Take fifteen pounds of sliced parsnips, and boil until quite soft in five gallons of water; squeeze the liquor well out of them, run it through a sieve, and add three pounds of coarse lump sugar to ev...
-258. Cash And Credit
If you would get rich, don't deal in bill hooks. Credit is the tempter in a new shape. Buy goods on trust, and you will purchase a thousand articles that Cash would never have dreamed of. A shilling...
-259. Why The Wedding-Ring Is Placed On The Fourth Finger
We have remarked on the vulgar error of a vein going from the fourth finger of the left hand to the heart. It is said by Swinburn and others that, therefore, it became the wedding-finger. The priestho...
-260. A Roman Lady's Toilet
The toilet of a Roman lady involved an elaborate and very costly process. It commenced at night, when the face, supposed to have been tarnished by exposure, was overlaid with a poultice composed of bo...
-261. Method Of Cleaning Paper-Hangings
Cut into eight half-quarters a quartern loaf, two days old;it must neither be newer nor staler. With one of these pieces, after having blown off all the dust from the paper to be cleaned, by the means...
-262. Prevent Moths
In the month of April or May, beat your fur garments well with a small cane or elastic stick, then lap them up in linen, without pressing the fur too hard, and put betwixt the folds some camphor in sm...
-263. German Yeast
We have repeatedly noticed the fatality of late of attacks of carbuncles, and the prevalence of diseases of that nature, which we were disposed to attribute to the state of the atmosphere, and as aris...
-264. How To Make Sea-Water
There cannot be a question that by far the simplest plan would consist in the evaporation of the sea-water itself in large quantities, preserving the resulting salt in closely-stopped vessels to preve...
-265. How To Take Cake Of Your Hat
If your hat is wet, shake it out as much as possible;then brush it with a soft brush as smooth as you can, or with a clean linen cloth or handkerchief; wipe it very carefully, keep the beaver flat and...
-266. Cure For Burns
Of all applications for a burn, we believe that there are none equal to a simple covering of common tcheat-flour. This is always at hand;and while it requires no skill in using, it produces most aston...
-267. Care Of Linen
When linen is well dried and laid by for use nothing more is necessary than to secure it from damp and insects; the latter may be agreeably performed by a judicious mixture of aromatic shrubs and flo ...
-268. Hair Oils
Rose Oil. -Olive oil, one pint;otto of roses, five to sixteen drops. Essence of bergamot being much cheaper, is usually used instead of the more expensive otto of roses. 269. Red Rose Oil The same. ...
-270. Hair Dye
A friend of ours, to whom we applied upon the subject, favoured us with the following information: - I have operated upon my own cranium for at least a dozen years, and though I have heard it affirmed...
-272. Bug Poison
Proof spirit, one pint;camphor, two ounces; oil of turpentine, four ounces;corrosive sublimate, one ounce. Mix. ...
-273. To Make A Fac-Simile Of A Leap In Copper
This beautiful experiment can be performed by any person in possession of a common galvanic battery. The process is as follows: - Soften a piece of gutta percha over a candle, or before a fire; knead ...
-274. Gold Fish
Great care must be taken of gold fish, as they are very susceptible; and hence a loud noise, strong smell, violent or even slight shaking of the vessel, will ofttimes destroy them. Small worms, which ...
-275. Method Of Hardening Objects In Plaster Of Paris
Take two parts of stearine, two parts of Venetian soap, one part of pearl-ash, and twenty-four to thirty parts of a solution of caustic potash. The stearine and soap are cut into slices, mixed with th...
-276. Cup In A Pie-Dish
The custom of placing an inverted cup in a fruit pie, the cook will inform us, is to contain the juice while the pie is baking in the oven, and prevent its boiling over; and she is the more convinced ...
-277. To Remove Ink-Stains From Silver
The tops and other portions of silver inkstands frequently become deeply discoloured with ink, which is difficult to remove by ordinary means. It may, however, be completely eradicated by making a lit...
-278. Parisian Etiquette
Many of our readers may be visiting Paris, and to such persons the following hints will be useful: Introduction to Society Avoid all extravagance and mannerism, and not be over-timid at the outset. ...
-279. - H Or No H? - How Mrs. Hitching Was Cured Of Her Habit Of Speaking Incorrectly
In the evening, after returning home, we were sitting by the fire, and felt comfortable and chatty, when I proposed to Mrs. Hitching the following Enigma, the author of which had favoured me with a c...
-280. Female Dress
It is well known that a loose and easy dress contributes much to give the sex the fine proportions of body that are observable in the Grecian statues, and which serve as models to our present artists,...
-281. Going In Debt
what comparison is there between the guilt of the poor uneducated wretch, who ventures, in rags and misery, to steal from the apparent superfluities of his neighbour a portion for his starving family,...
-282. The Female Temper
No trait of character is more agreeable in a female than the possession of a sweet temper. Home can never be happy without it. It is like the flowers that spring up in our pathway, reviving and cheeri...
-283. How To Remove Stains From Floors
removing spots of grease from boards, take equal parts of fullers' earth and pearlash, a quarter of a pound of each, and boil in a quart of soft water; and, while hot, lay it on the greased parts, all...
-284. Wills
A will is an instru ment in writing, executed in form of law, by which a person makes a dispo sition of his property, to take effect after his death. A codicil is a supplement or addition to a will, ...
-285. For Sprains And Bruises
Take one pint of train-oil, halfa-pound of stone-pitch, half-a-pound of resin, half-a-pound of bees wax, and half-a-pound of stale tallow or in like proportion. Boil them together for about half-an-ho...
-286. Sauce For Fish
Twenty-four anchovies chopped; ten eschalots; two ounces of horse-radish, scraped; four blades of mace; one lemon, sliced: twelve cloves; quarter-of-an-ounce of black pepper, whole; one gill of the an...
-287. Canaries
Especial care must be taken to keep the canary scrupulously clean. For this purpose, the cage should be strewed every morning with clean sand, or rather, fine gravel, for small pebbles are absolutely ...
-288. Mother Eve's Pudding
If you would have a good pudding, observe what you're taught:- Take two pennyworth of eggs, when twelve for the groat; And of the same fruit that Eve had once chosen, Well pared and well chopp'd, at ...
-289. Wash For Sunburn
Take two drachms of borax, one drachm of Roman alum, one drachm of camphor, half-an-ounce of sugar-candy, and a pound of ox-gall. Mix, and stir well for ten minutes or so, and repeat this stirring thr...
-290. Stewed Mushrooms
Cut off the ends of the stalks, and pare neatly some middle-sized or button-mushrooms, and put them into a basin of water with the juice of a lemon as they are done. When all are prepared, take them f...
-291. Questions & Answers On Familiar Things
Why do candles and lamps spirt, when rain is at hand? - Because the air is filled with vapour, and the humidity penetrates the wick, where (being formed into steam) it expands suddenly, and produces...
-319. Oyster Powder
Open the oysters carefully, so as not to cut them except in dividing the gristle which attaches the shells. Put them into a mortar, and when you have got as many as you can conveniently pound at once ...
-320. How To Win A Sweet-Heart
The attention and the admiration of an individual of the opposite sex may be obtained in various ways; and love may be and is often engendered where none is felt by the opposite party. But all this is...
-321. Lemon Sponge
For a quart mould - dissolve two ounces of isinglass in a pint and three quarters of water; strain it, and add three-quarters of a pound of sifted loaf sugar, the juice of six lemons and the rind of o...
-322. To Kill Slugs
Take a quantity of cabbage-leaves, and either put them into a warm oven, or hold them before the fire till they get quite soft; then rub them with unsalted butter, or any kind of fresh dripping, and l...
-323. How To Wash Kid Gloves
Have ready a little new milk in one saucer, and a piece of brown soap in another, and a clean cloth or. towel folded three or four times. On the cloth spread out the glove smooth and neat. Take a piec...
-324. Dyeing The Hair
It may be stated once for all that this practice is decidedly injurious. It may fail altogether in producing the desired result; it is never unattended by a certain amount of unpleasant circumstances,...
-325. Cooking Cold Butchers Meat
326. Beef Minced Cut into small dice remains of cold beef; and gravy reserved from it on the first day of its being served should be put in the stewpan with the addition of warm water some mace, ...
-337. To Clean White Satin And Flowered Silks
1. Mix sifted stale bread crumbs with powder blue, and rub it thoroughly all over, then shake it well, and dust it with clean soft cloths. Afterwards, where there are any gold or silver flowers, take ...
-338. Potted Beef
Take three or four pounds, or any smaller quantity of lean beeŁ free from sinews, and rub them well with a mixture made of a handful of salt, one ounce of saltpetre, and one ounce of coarse sugar; let...
-339. Cake Of Mixed Fruits
Extract the juice from red currants by simmering them very gently for a few minutes over a slow fire; strain it through a folded muslin, and to one pound of it add a pound and a-half of nonsuches or o...
-340. The Family Circle
Under this title, a series of friendly parties have been instituted by a group of acquaintances in New York. The following form of invitation and the rules of the Family Circle will be found interesti...
-341. Rice Bread
Take one pound and a half of rice, and boil it gently over a slow fire in three quarts of water about five hours, stirring it, and afterwards beating it up into a smooth paste. Mix this while warm int...
-342. Lying With The Head High
It is often a question amongst people who are unacquainted with the anatomy and physiology of man,whether lying with his head exalted or even with the body is most wholesome. Most, consulting their ow...
-343. American History In Brief
The following important facts in the history of the settlement and progress of the United States will be found interesting, and may save the readers of Inquire Within, as much time as they cost the co...
-344. To Wash A White Lace Veil
Put the veil into a strong lather of white soap and very clear water, and let it simmer slowly for a quarter of an hour. Take it out and squeeze it well, but be sure not to rub it. Rinse it in two col...
-345. Honey Soap
Cut thin two pounds of yellow soap into a double saucepan, occasionally stirring it till it is raelted, which will be in a few minutes if the water is kept boiling around it, then add a quarter of a p...
-346. To Distinguish Mushrooms From Poisonous Fungi
1. Sprinkle a little salt on the spongy part or gills of the sample to be tried. If they turn yellow they are poisonous, - if black, they are whole-some. Allow the salt to act before you decide on the...
-347. Lavender Scent Bag
Take of lavender flowers free from stalk, half a pound; dried thyme and mint of each half an ounce; ground cloves and caraways of each a quarter of an ounce; common salt, dried, one ounce; mix the who...
-348. Warming Cold Sweet Dishes
349. Rice Pudding Over the cold rice pudding pour a custard, and add a few lumps of jelly or preserved fruit. Remember to remove the baked coating of the pudding before the custard is poured over it....
-353 To Preserve Cucumbers
Take large and fresh-gathered cucumbers; split them down and take out all the seeds; lay them in salt and water that will bear an egg three days: set them on a fire with cold water, and a small lump o...
-351 Baked Pears
Take twelve large baking pears - pare and cut them into halves, leaving on the stem about half an inch long: take out the core with the point of a knife, and place them close together in a block-tin s...
-355. Sore Throat
I have been subject to sore throat, and have invariably found the following preparation (simple and cheap) highly efficacious when used in the early stage: Pour a pint of boiling water upon twenty-fiv...
-356. Belvedere Cakes, For Breakfast Or Tea
Take a quart of Hour, four eggs, a piece of butter the size of an egg, a piece of lard the same size; mix the butter and lard well in the flour; beat the eggs light in a pint bowl, and till it up with...
-357. Charcoal
All sorts of glass vessels and other utensils may bo purified from long-retained smells of every kind, in the easiest and most perfect manner, by rinsing them out well with charcoal powder, after the ...
-358. Staining
General Observations. - When alabaster, marble, and other stones, are coloured, and the stain is required to be deep, it should be poured on boiling-hot, and brushed equally over every part if made wi...
-358. Staining. Part 2
364. Sarlet Use lac-dye instead of the preceding. 365. Violet Dip in the tin mordant, and then immerse in a decoction of logwood. 366. Yellow 1. Impregnate with nitro hydro chlorate of tin, and ...
-358. Staining. Part 3
376. Blue 1. Dissolve copper filings in aquafortis, brush the wood with it, and then go over the work with a hot solution of pearl-ash (two ounces to a pint of water), till it assumes a perfectly ...
-385. Cure Of Warts
Dr. Lawrence, says, the easiest way to get rid of warts is to pare off the thickened skin which covers the prominent wart; cut it off by successive layers; shave it till you come to the surface of the...
-386. To Remove Freckles
Dissolve, in half an ounce of lemon-juice, one ounce of Venice soap, and add a quarter of an ounce each of oil on bitter almonds, and deliquated oil of tartar. Place this mixture in the sun till it ac...
-387. Directions For Putting On Gutta Percha Soles
Dry the old sole, and rougn it well with a rasp, after which, put on a thin coat of warm solution with the finger, rub it well in; let it dry, then hold it to the fire, and, whilst warm, put on a seco...
-388. Cod Liver Oil
Cod-liver oil is neither more nor less than cod-oil clarified; and consequently two-thirds of its medicinal qualities are abstracted thereby. Cod-oil can be purchased pure at any wholesale oil warehou...
-389. To Bottle Fruits
Buy a match in a bottle to exhaust all air, then place in the fruit to be preserved, quite dry, and without blemish; sprinkle sugar between each layer, put in the bung, and tie bladder over, setting t...
-390. To Clean Cane-Bottom Chairs
Turn up the chair bottom, etc and with hot water and a sponge wash the cane-work well, so that it may become completely soaked. Should it be very dirty you inust add soap. Let it dry in the open air, ...
-391. Teething
Young children whilst cutting their first set of teeth often suffer severe constitutional disturbance. At first there is restlessness and peevishness, with slight fever, but not unfrequently these are...
-392. To Make Anchovies
To a peck of sprats put two pounds of salt. three ounces of bay salt, one pound of saltpetre, two ounces of prunella, and a few grains of cochineal; pound them all in a mortar, then put into a stone p...
-393. Eyelashes
The mode adopted by the beauties of the East to increase the length and strength of their eyelashes is simply to clip the split ends with a pair of scissors about once a month. Mothers perform the ope...
-394. Apple Marmalade
Peel and core two pounds sub-acid apples and put them in an enamelled saucepan with one pint of sweet cider, or half a pint of pure wine, and one pound of crushed sugar, and cook them by a gentle heat...
-395. Cheap Fuel
One bushel of small coal or sawdust, or both mixed together, two bushels of sand, one bushel and a-half of clay. Let these be mixed together with common water, like ordinary mortar; the more they are ...
-396. Domestic Yeast
Ladies who are in the habit (and a most laudable and comfortable habit it is) of making domestic bread, cake, etc, are informed that they can easily manufac-ture their own yeast by attending to the fo...
-397. Cold Partridge Pie
Bone partridges, the number according to the size the pie is wanted, make some good force, and fill the partridges with it: put a whole raw truffle in each partridge, (let the truffle be peeled), rais...
-398. To Extinguish A Fire In A Chimney
So many serious fires have been caused by chimneys catching fire, and not being quickly extinguished, that the following method of doing this should be made generally known. - Throw some powdered brim...
-399. Superfluous Hair
Any remedy is doubtful; many of those commonly used are dangerous. The safest plan is as follows:-The hairs should be perseveringly plucked up by the roots, and the skin, having been washed twice a-da...
-400. Disinfecting Liquid
In a wine bottle of cold water, dissolve two ounces acetate of lead (sugar of lead;) and then add two (fluid) ounces of strong nitric acid (aquafortis). Shake the mixture and it will be ready for use....
-401. Cleanliness
I have more than once expressed my conviction that the humanizing influence of habits of cleanliness and of those decent observations which imply self-respec-best, indeed the only foundation of respe...
-402. Dyeing
The filaments from which stuffs of all kinds are fabricated, are derived either from the animal or the vegetable kingdom. We recognise the former by the property they possess of liberating ammonia on ...
-403. General Observations
The various shades produced by colour ing matters may be classed in one or other of the following group:- 1. Blues Simple. 2. Reds 3. Yellows 4. ...
-403. General Observations. Part 2
413. Yellow 1. Cut potatoe tops when in flower, and express the juice; steep articles in this for forty-eight hours. 2. Dip in a strong solution of weld after boiling in an aluminous mordant. ...
-403. General Observations. Part 3
425. Leather. Black Use No. 4 Black stain, and polish with oil. 426. Gloves, Nankeen Steep saffron in boiling hot soft water for about twelve hours; sew up the tops of the gloves, to prevent the ...
-440. Calf's Head Pie
Boil the head an hour and a half, or rathei more. After dining from it, cut the re maining meat of in slices. Boil the bones in a little of the liquor for three hours then strain it off, and let it re...
-441. Carpets
If the corner of a carpet gets loose and prevents the door opening, or trips every one up that enters the room, nail it down at once. A dog's eared carpet marks the sloven as well as the dog's-eared b...
-442. Mince Meat
Take seven pounds of currants well picked and cleaned; of finely chopped beef suet, the lean of a sirloin of beef minced raw, and finely chopped apples (Golden Pippins), each three and a half pounds; ...
-443. Elegant Bread Pudding
Take light white bread, and cut in thin slices. Put into a pudding-shape a layer of any sort of preserve, then a slice of bread, and repeat until the mould is almost full. Pour over all a pint of warm...
-444. Mock Crab
Take any required quantity of good fat mellow cheese, pound it well in a mortar, incorporating made mustard, salad oil, vinegar, pepper (cayenne is the best), and salt sufficient to season and render ...
-445. Curried Beef, Madras Way
Take about two ounces of butter, and place it in a saucepan, with two small onions cut up into slices, and let them fry until they are a light brown; then add a table-spoonful and a half of curry powd...
-446. Choice Of Friends
We should ever have it fixed in our memories, that by the character of those whom tec choose for our friends, our own is likely to he formed, and will certainty be judged of by the world. We ought the...
-447. Strasburg Potted Meat
Take a pound and a half of the rump of beef, cut into dice, and put it in an earthen jar, with a quarter of a pound of butter at the bottom; tie the jar close up with paper, and set over a pot to boil...
-448. Glazing For Hams, Tongues, Etc
Boil a shin of beef twelve hours in eight or ten quarts of water; draw the gravy from a knuckle of veal in the same manner; put the same herbs and spices as if for soup, and add the whole to the shin ...
-449. Bologna Sausages
Take equal quantities of bacon, fat and lean, beef, veal, pork, and beef suet; chop them small, season with pepper, salt, etc, sweet herbs and sage rubbed fine. Have a well-washed intestine, fill, and...
-450. Fruit Stains In Linen
To remove them, rub the part on each side with yellow soap, then tie up a piece of pearl-ash in the cloth, etc, and soak well in hot water, or boil; afterwards expose the stained part to the sun and a...
-451. Preserving The Colour Of Dresses
The colour of merinos, mousseline-de-laines, ging hams, chintzes, printed lawns, etc., may be preserved by using water that is only milk-warm; making a lather with white soap before you put in the dre...
-452. Sweet Bags Foe Linen
These may be composed of any mixtures jf the following articles: - flowers dried and pounded; powdered cloves, mace, nutmeg, cinnamon; leaves-dried and pounded - of mint, balm, dragon-wort, southern-w...
-453. Wedding-Rings
The custom of wearing wedding-rings appears to have taken its rise among the Romans. Before the celebration of their nuptials, there was a meeting of friends at the house of the lady's father, to sett...
-454. To Avoid Catching Cold
Accustom yourself to the use of sponging with cold water every morning on first getting out of bed. It should be followed with a good deal of rubbing with a wet towel. It has considerable effect in gi...
-455. Cleaning Japanned Waiters, Urns, Etc
Rub on with a sponge a little white soap and some lukewarm water, and wash the waiter or urn quite clean. Never use hot water, as it will cause the japan to scale off. Having wiped it dry, sprinkle a...
-456. Ceremonies
All ceremonies are in themselves very silly things; but yet a man of the world should know them. They are the outworks of manners and decency, which would be too often broken in upon, if it were not f...
-457. To Clean Looking-Glasses, Mirrors, Etc
If they should be hung so high that they cannot be conveniently reached, have a pair of steps to stand upon; but mind that they stand steady. Then take a piece of a soft sponge, well washed and cleane...
-458. Scones
Flour, two pounds; bi-carbonate of soda, quarter of an ounce; salt, quarter of an ounce; sour buttermilk, one pint, more or less. Mix to the consistence of light dough, and roll out about half an inch...
-459. Unfermented Cakes, Etc
460. Tea Cakes Take of flour, one pound; sugar, one ounce; butter, one ounce; muriatic acid, two drachms; bi-carbonate of soda, two drachms; milk, six ounces; water, six ounces. Rub the butter into ...
-471. Pastry For Tarts, Etc
Take of flour one pound; bi-carbonate of soda, two drachma; muriatic acid, two drachms; butter, six ounces. Water enough to bring it to the consistence required. 472. Bread Pudding Unfer-mented brow...
-474. Balls And Evening Parties
475. An invitation to a ball should be given at least a week beforehand. 476. Upon entering, first address the lady of the house; and after her, the nearest acquaintances you may recognize in the ...
-578. Cooks
Cooks should be cautioned against the use of charcoal in any quantity, except where there is a free current of air; for charcoal is highly prejudicial in a state of ignition, although it may be render...
-579. The Housewife
The Housewife who is anxious to dress no more meat than will suffice for the meal, should know that beef loses about one pound in four in boiling, but in roasting, loses in the proportion of one pound...
-580. The Americans
The Americans, generally speaking, are very deficient in the practice of culinary economy; a French family would live well on what is often wasted in an American kitchen: the bones, drippings, pot-liq...
-581. If You Are About To Furnish A Souse
If You Are About To Furnish A Souse, do not spend all your money, be it much or .little. Do not let the beauty of thin thing, and the cheapness of that, tempt you to buy unnecessary articles. Doctor F...
-585. Bread
Bread contains eighty nutritious parts in 100; meal thirty-four in 100; French beans, ninety-two in 100; common beans, eighty-nine in 100; peas, ninety-three in 100; lentils, ninety-four in 100; cabba...
-586. To Test Flour
To Test Flour, people in the trade generally knead a small quantity by way of experiment; if good, the flour immediately forms an adhesive elastic paste, which will readily assume any form that may be...
-587. A Great Increase On Home-Made Bread
A Great Increase On Home-Made Bread, even equal to one fifth, may be produced by using bran water for kneading the dough. The proportion is three pounds of bran for every twenty-eight pounds of flour,...
-588. Excellent Paste
Excellent Paste for fruit or meat pies may be made with two-thirds of wheat-flour, one-third of the flour of boiled potatoes, and some butter or dripping; the whole being brought to a proper consisten...
-589. Potatoes
There are few articles in families more subject to waste, both in paring, boiling, and being actually thrown away, than potatoes; and chere are few cooks but what boil twice as many potatoes every day...
-590. Boiling
This most simple of culinary processes is uot often per-formed in perfection; it does not require quite so much nicety and attendance as roasting; to skim your pot well, and keep it really boiling (th...
-598. Roasting
Beef. - The noble sirloin of about fifteen pounds (if much thicker the outside will be done too much before the inside is enough), will require to be before the fire about three and a half or four hou...
-600. Ribs Of Beef
The three first ribs, of fifteen or twenty pounds, will take three hours, or three and a-half; the fourth and fifth ribs will take as long, managed in the same way as the sirloin. Paper the fat and th...
-602. Mutton
As beef requires a large sound fire, mutton must have a brisk and sharp one; if you wish to have mutton tender it should be hung as long as it will keep, and then good eight-tooth, i. e. four years' o...
-609. Mutton (Venison Fashion)
Take a neck of good four or five-year-old wether mutton, cut long in the bones; let it hang, in temperate weather, at least a week. Two days before you dress it, take allspice and black pepper, ground...
-615. Veal Sweetbread
Trim a fine sweetbread, it cannot be too fresh; parboil it for five minutes, and throw it into a basin of cold water; roast it plain, or beat up the yolk of an egg, and prepare some fine bread crumbs....
-Lamb
616. Lamb is a delicate and commonly considered tender meat, but those who talk of tender lamb, while they are thinking of the age of the animal forget that even a chicken must be kept a proper time ...
-627. Preparation Of Vegetables
There is nothing in which the difference between an elegant and an ordinary table is more seen than in the dressing of vegetables, more especially of greens: they may be equally as fine at first, at o...
-636. To Have Vegetables Delicately Cuban
To Have Vegetables Delicately Cuban, put on your pot, make it boil, put a little salt in and skim it perfectly clean before you put in the greens, etc, which should not be put in till the water boils ...
-641. Preserving Fruit
The grand secret of preserving is to deprive the fruit of its water of vegetation in the shortest time possible; for which purpose the fruit ought to be gathered just at the point of proper maturity. ...
-650. Bathing
If to preserve health be to save medical expenses, without even reckoning upon time and comfort, there is no part of the house-bold arrangement so important to the domestic economist as cheap convenie...
-654. Washing
The most important department of domestic economy naturally includes the wash-house, into which philosophy has found its way for the application of many useful principles, and much useful practice. (S...
-659. Exercise
Three principal points in the manner of taking exercise are necessary to be attended to: - 1. The kind of exercise. 2. The proper time for exercise. 3. The duration of it. With respect to the kinds of...
-672. Carpets
In buying a carpet, as in everything else, those of the best quality are cheapest in the end. As it is extremely desirable that they should look as clean as possible, avoid buying carpet that has any ...
-684. Cleansing of Furniture
The cleaning, of furniture forms an important part of domestic economy, not only in regard to neatness- but also in point of expense. 685. The readiest mode indeed consists in good manual rubbing, or...
-695. Precautions In Case Of Fire
The following precautions should be impressed upon the memories of all our readers: 696. Should a fire break out, send off to the nearest engine or police-station. 697. Fill buckets with water, carr...
-709. A Winter Salad
Two large potatoes, passed through kitchen sieve, Unwonted softness to the salad give, Of mordent mustard add a single spoon- Distrust the condiment which bites so soon; But deem it not, thou ...
-710. Economy
If you have a strip of land, do not throw away soap-suds. Both ashes and soap-6uds are good manure for bushes and young plants. .711. Woollen clothes should be washed in very hot suds, and not rinsed...
-739. Rules Of The Game Of Draughts
The nine laws for regulating the game of draughts are as follows: - 740. Each player takes the first move alternately, whether the last game be won or drawn. 741. Any action which prevents the Adver...
-748. Sea Pie
Make a thick pudding crust, line a dish with it, or what is better, a cake tin, put a layer of sliced onions, then a layer of salt beef cut in slices, a layer of sliced potatoes, a layer of pork, and ...
-749. The Young Lady's Toilette
750. Self-Knowledge - The Enchanting Mirror. This curious glass will bring your faults to light, And make your virtues shine both strong and bright. 751. Contentment - Wash to smooth Wrinkles. A ...
-765. Camp Cookery
766. Stewed Salt Beef And Pork (A La Omar Pasha) Put into a canteen saucepan about two pounds of well soaked beef, cut in eight pieces; half-a-pound of salt pork, divided in two, and also soaked; ...
-773. Early Rising
The difference between rising every morning at six and at eight, in the course of forty years, amounts to 29,200 hours or three years one hundred and twenty one days and sixteen hours, which are equal...
-774. Composition
If you would write to any purpose, you must be perfectly free from without, in the first place, and yet more free from within. Give yourself the natural rein; think on no pattern, no patron, no paper,...
-786. Biting The Nails
This is a habit that should be immediately corrected in children, as, if persisted in for any length of time, it permanently deforms the nails. Dipping the finger-ends in some bitter tincture will gen...
-787. To Fill A Decayed Tooth
Procure a small piece of gutta perch a', drop it into boiling water, then, with the thumb and finger, take off as much as you suppose will fill up the tooth nearly level, and while in thin soft state ...
-788. To Restore Hair When Removed By ILL Health Or Age
Onions rubbed frequently on the part requiring it. The stimulating powers of this vegetable are of service in restoring the tone of the skin, and assisting the capillary vessels in sending forth new h...
-789. Birds' Eggs
In selecting eggs for a cabinet, always choose those which are newly laid; make a medium sized hole at the sharp end with a pointed instrument: having made the hole at the sharp end, make one at the b...
-790. Preserving Eggs
The several modes recommended for preserving eggs any length of time are not always successful. The egg, to be preserved well, should be kept at a temperature so low that the air and fluids within its...
-791. Gossiping
If you wish to cultivate a gossiping, meddling, censorious spirit in your children, be sure when they come home from church, a visit, or any other place where you do not accompany them, to ply them wi...
-792. Words
Soft words soften the soul. - Angry words are fuel to the flame of wrath, and make it blaze more freely. Kind words make other people good-natured - cold words freeze people, and hot words scorch them...
-793. Pickling
Do not keep pickles in common earthen-ware, as the glazing contains lead, and combines with the vinegar. Vinegar for pickling should be sharp, though not the sharpest kind, as it injures the pickles. ...
-794. Yulecake
Take one pound of fresh butter, one pound of sugar, one pound and a half of flour, two pounds of currants, a glass of brandy, one pound of sweetmeats, two ounces of sweet almonds, ten eggs, a quarter ...
-793. To Wash China Crape Scarfs, Etc
If the fabric be good, these articles of dress can be washed as frequently as may be required, and no diminution of their beauty will be discoverable, even when the various shades of green have been e...
-796. Advice To Young Ladies
797. If you have blue eyes, you need not languish. 798. If black eyes, you need not stare. 799. If you have pretty feet there if no occasion to wear short petticoats. 800. If you are doubtful as ...
-815. To Extract Grease-Spots From Books Or Paper
Gently warm the greased or spotted part of the book or paper, and then press upon it pieces of blotting-paper, one after another,- so as to absorb as much of the grease as possible. Have ready some fi...
-816. To Preserve Milk
Provide bottles, which must be perfectly clean, sweet, and dry: draw the milk from the cow into the bottles, and as they are filled, immediately cork them well up, and fasten the corks with pack-threa...
-817. German Paste
German paste for cage birds, which will be found of better quality and cheaper than what is sold in the shops. - Boil four eggs until quite hard, then throw them into cold water; remove the white, and...
-818. French Polish For Boots And Shoes
Mix together two pints of the best vinegar and one pint of soft-water; stir into it a quarter of a pound of glue, broken up, half a pound of logwood chips, a quarter of an ounce of finely powdered ind...
-819. Damp Walls
The following method is recommended to prevent the effect of damp walls on paper in rooms: - Line the damp part of the wall with sheet lead, rolled very thin, and fastened up with small copper nails. ...
-820. Tea-Making
Dr. Kitchener recommends that all the water necessary should be poured in at once as the second drawing is bad. When much tea is wanted, it is better to have two tea-pots instead of two drawings. ...
-821. Rice-Flour Cement
An excellent cement may be made from rice flour, which is at present used for that purpose in China and Japan. It is only necessary to mix the rice-flour intimately with cold water, and gently simmer ...
-822. Rules Of Conduct
We cannot do better than quote the valuable injunctions of that excellent woman, Mrs. Fry, who combined in her character and conduct all that is truly excellent in woman: - 1 I never lose any time; I ...
-823. Food Of Blackbirds
The natural food of the blackbird is berries, worms, insects, shelled-snails, cherries, and other similar fruit; and its artificial food, lean fresh meat, cut very small, and mixed with bread, or Germ...
-824. Cramp In Bathing
For the cure of the cramp when swimming, Dr. Franklin recommends a vig orous and violent shock to the part affected, by suddenly and forcibly stretching out the leg, which should be darted out of the ...
-825. To Extinguish A Fire In A Chimney
Throw some powdered brimstone on the fire in the grate, or ignite some on the hob, and then put a board or something in the front of the fire-place to prevent the fumes descending into the room. The v...
-826. To Get Rid Of A Bad Smell In A Room Newly Painted
Place a vessel full of lighted charcoal in the middle of the room, and throw on it two or three handfuls of juniper berries; shut the windows, the chimney, and the door close; twenty-four hours afterw...
-827. Rice Dumplings
Pick and wash a pound of rice, and boil it gently in two quarts of water till it becomes dry - keeping the pot well covered, and not stirring it. Then take it oft the fire and spread it out to cool on...
-828. Coughs
It is said that a small piece of resin dipped in the water which is placed in a vessel on a stove (not an open fire-place), will add a peculiar property to the atmosphere of the room, which will give ...
-829. Method Of Ascertaining The State Of The Lungs
Persons desirous of ascertaining the true state of their lungs, are directed to draw in as much breath as they conveniently can; they are then to count as far as they are able, in a slow and audible v...
-830. To Preserve Steel Goods From Rust
After bright grates have been thoroughly cleaned, they should be dusted over with unslaked lime, and thus left until wanted. All the coils of piano wires are thus sprinkled, and will keep from rust fo...
-831. How To Get Sleep
How to get sleep is to many persons a matter of high importance. Nervou persons who are troubled with wake fulness and excitability, usually have strong- tendency of blood on the brain with cold extre...
-832. Turkish Mode Of Making Coffee
The Turkish way of making coffee produces a very different result from that to which we are accustomed. A small conical saucepan, with a long handle, and calculated to bold about two table-spoonfuls o...
-833. How To Treat A Wife
First, get a wife; secondly, be patient. You may have great trials and perplexities in your business with the world, but do not carry to your home a clouded or contracted brow. Your wife may have had ...
-835. Cleanliness
Cleanliness, it is said, has a powerful influence on the health and preservation of the body. Cleanliness, as well in our garments as in our dwellings, prevents the pernicious effects of dampness, of ...
-836. First-Watch Stew
Cut pieces of salt beef and pork into dice, put them into a stew-pan with six whole peppercorns two blades of mace, a few cloves, a tea-spoonful of celery-seeds, and a faggot of dried sweet herbs; cov...
-837. Seven-Bell Pasty
Shred a pound of suet fine, cut salt pork into dice, potatoes and onions small, rub a sprig of dried sage up fine, mix with some pepper, and place in the corner of a square piece of paste, turn over t...
-838. Directions For Taking Leaf Impressions
Hold oiled paper in the smoke of a lamp, or of pitch, until it becomes coated with the smoke; to this paper apply the leaf of which you wish an impression, having previously warmed it between your han...
-839. Leaf Printing
After warming the leaf between the hands, apply printing ink, by means of a small leather ball containing cotton, or some soft substance, or with the end of the finger. The leather ball (and the finge...
-840. Plant Skeletons
The leaves are to be put into an earthen or glass vessel, and a large quantity of rain-water to be poured over them; after this they are to be left to the open air and to the heat of the sun, without ...
-841. Rolls
Mix the salt with the flour. Make a deep hole in the middle. Stir the warm water into the yeast, and pour it into the hole in the flour. Stir it with a spoon just enough to make a thin batter, and spr...
-842. Early Rising
Dr.Wilson Philip, in his Treatise on Indigestion, says: - Although it is of consequence to the debilitated to go early to bed, there are few things more hurtful to them than remaining in it too lon...
-843. Superior Cleanliness
Superior Cleanliness sooner attracts our regard than even finery itself, and often gains esteem where the other fails. ...
-844. Coffee A Disinfectant
Numerous experiments with roasted coffee prove that it is the most powerful means, not only of rendering animal and vegetable effluvia innocuous, but of absolutely destroying them. A room in which mea...
-845. Utility Of Singing
It is asserted, and we believe with some truth, that singing is a corrective of the too common tendency to pulmonic complaints. Dr. Rush, an eminent physician, observed on this subject: - The Germans...
-847. The Chemical Baro-Meter
Take a long narrow bottle, such as an old-fashioned Eau-de-Cologne bottle, and put into it two and a half drachms of camphor, and eleven drachms of spirits of wine; when the camphor is dissolved, whic...
-848. Frugality
The great philosopher, Dr. Franklin, inspired the mouth-piece of his own eloquence, Pool Richard, with many a gem of purest ray serene, encased in the homely garb of proverbial truisms. On the sub...
-864. Conversation
865. There are many talkers, but few who know how to converse agreeably. (See 279, 3015.) 866. Speak distinctly, neither too rapidly nor too slowly. 867. Accommodate the pitch of your voice to the ...
-878. Cleanliness
The want of cleanliness is a fault which admits of no excuse. Where water can be had for nothing, it is surely in the power of every person to be clean. 879. The discharge from our bodies, by perspir...
-882. Most Diseases Of The Skin Proceed From Want Of Cleanliness
These indeed may be caught by infection, bnt they will seldom continue long where cleanliness prevails. 883. To the same cause must weim pute the various kinds of vermin that infest the human body, h...
-906. Domestic Pharmacopoeia
In compiling this part of our hints, we have endeavoured to supply that kind of information that is so often wanted in the time of need, and cannot be obtained when a medical man or a druggist is not ...
-916. Confections And Electuaries
917. Confections are used as vehicles for the administration of more active medicines, and Electuaries are made for the purpose of rendering some remedies palatable. Both should be kept in closely ...
-928. Decoctions
929. These preparations soon spoi and therefore should only be made i: small quantities, particularly in sum mer. 930. Of Chimaphila Take on ounce of pyrola, (chimaphila or winte green), and boil ...
-933. Embrocations and Liniments
934. These remedies are used externally as local stimulants, to relieve deep-seated inflammations when other means cannot be employed, as they are more easily applied locally. 935. Anodyne And ...
-942. Enemas
943. Are a peculiar kind of medicines, administered by injecting them into the rectum or outlet of the body. The intention is either to empty the bowels, kill worms, protect the lining membrane of ...
-952. Gargles
953. Are remedies used to stimulate chronic sore throats, or a relaxed state of the swallow or uvula. 954. Acidulated Mix one part of white vinegar with three parts of honey of roses, and twenty-...
-961. Lotions
962. Lotions are usually applied to the parts required by means of a piece of linen rag wetted with them, or by wetting the bandage itself. 963. Emollient Use decoction of marsh-mallow or linseed. ...
-976. Ointments and Cerates
977. These remedies are used as topical applications to parts, generally ulcers, and are usually spread upon linen or other materials. 978. Camphorated Mix half an ounce of camphor with one ounce ...
-991. Mixtures
992. Fever, Simple Add three ounces of spirit of mindererus {Liquor ammonia aertatis) to five ounces of water, of 'uodicated water, such as cinnamon, aniseed, etc. Dose, for an adult, one ounce ...
-1001. Drinks
1002. Tamarind Boil two ounces of the pulp of tamarinds in two pints of milk, then strain. Use, as a refrigerant drink. 1003. Tamarind Dissolve two ounces of the pulp in two pints of warm water, ...
-1004. Powders
1005. Compound Soda Mix one drachm of calomel, five drachms of ses-qui-carbonate of soda, and ten drachms of compound chalk powder together. Dose, five grains. Use, as a mild purgative for children ...
-1014. Miscellaneous
1015. Jethereal Tincture Of Male Fern Digest one ounce male fern buds in eight ounces of sulphuric aether, then strain. Dose, thirty drops early in the morning. Use, to kill tape-worm. 1016. ...
-1021. Gardening Operations For The Year
1022. January. - Flower of the month - Christmas Rose. 1023. Gardening. - Indoor preparations for future operations must be made, as in this month there are only five hours a-day available for out-...
-1021. Gardening Operations For The Year. Continued
1036. August. - Flowers of the month - Harebell and mallow. 1037. Gardening Operations. - Sow flower to flower in-doors in winter, and pot all young stocks raised in the greenhouse. Sow early r?d ...
-1046. Kitchen Garden
This is one of the most important parts of general domestic economy, whenever the situation of a house will permit a family to avail themselves of its assistance, in aid of butchers' bills. It is, ind...
-1047. Temperance
If, observes a writer, men lived uniformly in a healthy climate, were possessed of strong and vigorous frames, were descended from healthy parents, were educated in a hardy and active manner, were ...
-1052. Children
Happy indeed is the child who, during the first period of its existence, is fed upon no other aliment than the milk of its mother, or that of a healthy nurse. If other food becomes necessary before th...
-1069. In The First Year Of Infancy
In The First Year Of Infancy, many expressions of the tender organs are to be considered only as efforts or manifestations of power. 1070. We observe, for instance, that a child, as soon as it is und...
-1097. Family Tool Chests
Much inconvenience and considerable expense might be saved, if it was the general custom to keep in every house certain tools for the purpose of performing at home what are called small jobs, instead ...
-1121. China And Glass Ware
The best material for cleansing either porcelain or glass-ware, is fullers' earth; but it must be beaten into a fine powder, and carefully cleared from all rough or hard particles, which might endange...
-1135. Economy Of Fuel-T
Economy Of Fuel-T here is no part of domestic economy which everybody professes to understand better than the management of a fire, and yet there is no branch in the household arrangement where there ...
-1150. Health In Youth
Late hours, irregular habits, and want of attention to diet, are common errors with most young men, and these gradually, but at first imperceptibly, undermine the health, and lay the foundation for va...
-1151. A Wife's Power
The power of a wife for good or evil, is irresistible. Home must be the seat of happiness, or it must be for ever unknown. A good wife is to a man, wisdom, and courage, and strength, and endurance. A ...
-1152. Advice To Wives
A wife must learn how to form her husband's happiness, in what direction the secret lies; she must not cherish his weaknesses by working upon them; she must not rashly run counter to his prejudices; h...
-1153. Counsels For The Young
Never be cast down by trifles. If a spider break his thread twenty times, twenty times will he mend it again. Make up your minds to do a thing and you will do it. Fear not if a trouble comes upon you;...
-1154. Sally Lunn Tea Cakes
Take one pint of milk quite warm, quarter of a pint of thick, small-beer yeast: put them into a pan with flour sufficient to make it as thick as batter, -cover it over, and let it stand till it has ri...
-1155. French Bread And Rolls
Take a pint and a half of milk; make it quite warm; half a pint of small-beer yeast; add sufficient flour to make it as thick as batter; put it into a pan; cover it over, and keep it warm; when it has...
-1156. Rules For The Preservation Of Health
1157. PuRe atmospheric air is composed of nitrogen, oxygen, and a very small proportion of carbonic acid gas. Air once breathed has lost the chief part of its oxygen, and acquired a proportionate ...
-1187. Use Of Lime-Water In Making Bread
It has lately been found that water saturated with lime produces in bread the same whiteness, softness and capacity of retaining moisture, as results from the use of alum; while the former removes all...
-1188. Special Rules For The Prevention Of Cholera
1189. We urge the necessity, in all cases of cholera, of an instant recourse to medical aid, and also under every form and variety of indisposition: for all disorders are found to merge in the ...
-1211. Etiquette Of The Newly Married
A newly married couple send out cards immediately after the - ceremony, to their friends and acquaintance, who, on their part, return either notes or cards of congratulation on the event. As soon as t...
-1212. Diseases
For the proper Remedies and their Doses see Prescriptions, 1273. 1213. It should be clearly understood, that in all cases of disease, the advice of a skilful physician is of the first importance. I...
-1212. Diseases. Part 2
1224. Dropsy Evacuate the water by means of No. 11. 1225. Epilepsy If accompanied or produced by a fulness of the vessels of the head, leeches to the temples, blisters, and No. 1 and No. 7. If ...
-1212. Diseases. Part 3
1250. Menstruation (Excessive) No. 47 during the attack, with rest in the recumbent position; in the inter vals, No. 46. 1251. - Menstruation (Scanty) In strong patients, cupping the loins. ...
-1235. Inflammations
1235. Inflammation Of The Bladder Bleeding, aperients No. 5 and No. 7, the warm bath, afterwards opium; the pill No. 12 three times a day till relieved. Avoid fermented liquors, etc. 1236. ...
-1273. - Prescriptions
To be used in the Cases enumerated under the head Disoases, 1213. 1274. The following prescriptions, originally derived from various Prescrib-ers' Pharmacopoeias, embody the favorite remedies emplo...
-24. For A Clyster
A pint and a half of gruel or fat broth, a tablespoon-ful of castor oil, one of common salt, and a lump of butter; mix, to be injected slowly. 25. Chalk mixture, seven ounces; aromatic and opiate con...
-27. Lotion
Common salt, one ounce; distilled water, seven ounce; spirits of wine, one ounce; mix. 28. Dried sulphate of magnesia, six drams; heavy carbonate of magnesia, two drains; wine of colchicum, two drams...
-1275. Useful Receipts
1276. Ointment For Scurf In The Heads Of Infants Lard, two ounces; sulphuric acid, diluted, two drams; rub .them together, and anoint the head once a day. 1277. Rancid Butter This may be restored ...
-1311. Offensive Breath
For this purpose, almost the only substance that should be admitted at the toilette is the concentrated solution of chloride of soda. From six to ten drops of it in a wine glass full of pure spring wa...
-1315. Treatment Of Warts
Pare the hard and dried skin from their tops, and then touch them with the smallest drop of strong acetic acid, taking care that the acid does not run off the wart upon the neighbouring skin, for if i...
-1316. To Fatten Fowls In A Short Time
Mix together ground rice well scalded with milk, and add some coarse sugar. Feed therewith this in the day-time, but not too much at once: let it be pretty thick. ...
-1317. To Discover Whether Bread Is Adulterated With Alum
The bread must be soaked in water, and to the water in which it has been soaked, a little of the solution of muriate of lime must be added, upon which, if any alum be present, the liquid will be perva...
-1318. To Make Impressions Of Leaves Upon Silks, Satin, Paper, Or Any Other Substance
Prepare two rubbers of wash-leather, made by tying up wool or any other substance in wash-leather; then prepare the colours which you wish the leaves to be, by rubbing up with cold-drawn linseed oil t...
-1320. To Clean Hair Brushes
As hot water and soap very soon soften the hairs, and rubbing completes their destruction, use soda, dissolved in cold water, instead; soda having an affinity for grease, it cleans the brush with litt...
-1321. To Clean French Kid Gloves
Put the gloves on your hand and wash them, as if you were washing your hands, in some spirits of turpentine, until quite clean; then hang them up in a warm place, or where there is a current of air, a...
-1322. Easy Method Of Breaking Glass To Any Required Figure
Make a small notch by means of a tile on the edge of a piece of glass, then make the end of a tobacco-pipe, or of a rod of iron of the same size, red hot in the fire, apply the hot iron to the notch, ...
-1323. Errors In Speaking
Errors In Speaking, (see 2965.) There are several kinds of errors in speaking. The most obectionable of them are those in which words are employed that are unsuitable to convey the meaning intended. T...
-1323. Errors In Speaking. Continued
1350. Rule After writing a sentence always look through it, and see that wherever the word It is employed, it refers to or carries the mind back to the object which it is intended to point out 1351....
-1323. Errors In Speaking. Continued. Part 2
1397. Instead of I would do the same if I was him, say I would do the same if I were he. 1398. Instead of I had as lief go myself, say I would as soon go my-lf, or I would rather. ...
-1323. Errors In Speaking. Continued. Part 3
1461. Instead of A sad curse is war, say War is a sad curse. 1642. Instead of He stands six foot high, say He measures six feet, or, His height is six feet. 1463. Instead of I go every ...
-1323. Errors In Speaking. Continued. Part 4
1522. Instead of How do you do ? say How are you? 1523. Instead of Not so well as I could wish say Not quite well. 1524. Avoid such phrases as No great shakes, Nothing to boast of, ...
-1602. Pronunciation
Accent is a particular stress or force of the voice upon certain syllables or words. This mark ' in printing denotes the syllable upon which the stress or force of the voice should be placed. 1603. A...
-1617. Rules Of Pronunciation
1618. C before a, o, and u, and in gome other situations, is a close articulation, like k. Before e i and y c is precisely equivalent to sin same,this, as in cedar, civil, cypress, capacity. 1619 E ...
-1617. Rules Of Pronunciation. Continued
Asia, asha. Asparagus, not asparagrass. Awkward, awk-wurd, not awk-urd. Bade, bad. Because, be-cawz not be-cos. Been, bin. Beloved, as a verb, be-luvd, as an adjective, be-luv-ed. Blessed, curse...
-1647. Punctuation
Punctuation teaches the method of placing Points, in written or printed matter, in such a manner as to indicate the pauses which would be made by the author if he were communicating his thoughts orall...
-1663. Hints Upon Spelling
The following rules will be found of great assistance in writing, because they relate to a class of words about the spelling of which doubt and hesita tion are frequently felt: - 1664. All words of o...
-1678. Quadrilles
THE First Set. 1679. Figure 1. Le Pantalon. - Right and left. Balancez to partners: turn partners. Ladies chain. Half promenade: half right and left. (Four times). 1680. Figure 2. L'ete. - Leading l...
-1686. Lancers
La Rose - First gentleman and opposite lady advance and set - turn with both h&nds, rettiog to places - return, leading outside - set and turn at corners. 1687. La Lodoiska First couplo advance twic...
-1691. The Caledonians
First Figure - The first and opposite couples hands across round the centre and back to places - set and turn partners. Ladies' chain - half promenade. Half right and left. Repeated by the side couple...
-1696. Spanish Dance
Danced in a circle or a lino by sixteen or twenty couples. The couples stand as for a Country Dance, except that the first gentleman must stand on the ladies' side, and the first lady on the gentleman...
-1697. Waltz Cotillion
Places the same as quadrille; first couple waltz round inside, first and second ladies ad-ranee twice and cross over, turning twice; first and second gentleman do the same, and third and fourth couple...
-1699. The Galopade Quadrilles
1st, Galopade. 2d, Right and left, sides the same. 3d, Set and turn hands all eight. 4th, Galopade. 5th, Ladies' chain, sides the same. sth, Set and turn partners all eight. 7th, Galopade. 8th, Tirois...
-1700. The Mazurka
This dance is of Polish origin. It consists of twelve movements; and the first eight bars are played (as in quadrilles) before the first movement commences. 1701. The Redowa Waltz is composed of thre...
-Waltzes
1702. Valse Cellarius The gentleman takes the lady's left hand with his right, moving one bar to the left by glissade, and two hops on his left foot, while the lady does the same to the right on her ...
-1706. Circassian Circle
The company is arranged in couples round the room - the ladies being placed on the right of the gentlemen, alter which the first and second couples lead off the dance. Figure. Right and left set and t...
-1709. The Schottishe
The gentleman holds the lady precisely as in the polka. Beginning with the right foot, he slides itlbrward,then brings up the right foot to the place of the left - slides the left foot forward - and s...
-1710. Country Dances
Sir Roger de Coverly - First lady and bottom gentleman advance to centre, salute, and retire; first gentleman and bottom lady same. First lady and bottom gentleman advance to centre, turn, and retire;...
-1712. The Highland Reel
This dance has now become a great favorite; it is performed by the company arranged in parties of three along the room in the following manner: a lady between two gentlemen in double rows - all advanc...
-1713. Terms used to describe the Movements of Dances
Balancez: Set to partners. Chaine Anglaise: The top and bottom couples right and left. Chaine Anglaise double: The right and left double. Chaine des dames: The ladies' chain. Chaine des dames doub...
-1714. Terms Used To Express The Properties Of Medicines
1715. Absorbents are medicines which destroy acidities in the stomach and bowels, such as magnesia, prepared chalk, etc. 1716. Alteratives are medicines which restore health to the constitution, ...
-1769. Hints Upon Personal Manners
It is sometimes objected to books upon etiquette that they cause those who consult them to act with mechanical restraint, and to show in society that they are governed by arbitrary rules, rather than ...
-1792. Be A Gentleman
Moderation, decorum, and neatness, distinguish the gentleman; he is at all times affable, diffident, and studious to please. Intelligent and polite, his behaviour is pleasant and graceful. When he ent...
-1827. Habits Of A Man Of Business
A sacred regard to the principles of justice forms the basis of every transaction, and regulates the conduct of the upright man of business. He is strict in keeping his engagements. Does nothing car...
-1828 Milk Lemonade
Dissolve three quarters of a pound of loaf sugar in one pint of boiling water, and mix with them one gill of lemon juice, and a gill of sherry, then add three gills of cold milk. Stir the whole well t...
-1829. Ground Glass
The frosted appearance of ground glass may be very nearly imitated by gently dabbing the glass over with a piece of glazier's putty, stuck on the ends of the fingers. When applied with a light and eve...
-1830. Vegetable Soup
Peel and cut up very fine three onions, three turnips, one carrot, and four potatoes, put them into a stevvpan with a quarter of a pound of butter, the same of lean ham, and a bunch of parsley, pass t...
-1831. To Pickle Gherkins
Put about two hundred and fifty in a pickle of two pounds, and let them remain in it three hours. Put them in a sieve to drain, wipe them, and place them in a jar. For a pickle, best vinegar one gallo...
-1833. Cutaneous Eruptions
The following mixture is very useful in all cutaneous eruptions: - Ipecacuanha wine, four drachms; flowers of sulphur, two drachms; tincture of cardamoms, one ounce. Mix. One teaspoonful to be taken t...
-1834. When To Change The Water In Which Leeches Are Kept
Once a month in winter, and once a week in summer, is sufficiently often, unless the water becomes discoloured or bloody, when it should be changed every day. Either clean pond water, or clean rain wa...
-1835. Peas Pudding
Dry a pint or quart of split peas thoroughly before the fire; then tie them up loosely in a cloth, put them into warm water, boil them a couple of hours, or more, until quite tender; take them up, bea...
-1836. To Arrest Bleeding At The Nose
Introduce by means of a probe, a small piece of lint or soft cotton, previously dipped into some mild styptic, as a solution of alum, white vitriol, creosote, or even cold water. This will generally s...
-1837. To Clear Vegetables Of Insects
Make a strong brine of one pound and a half of salt to one gallon of water, into this place the vegetables with the stalk ends uppermost, for two or three hours; this will destroy all the insects whic...
-1838. Disinfecting Fumigation
Common salt, three ounces; black manganese, oil of vitriol, of each one ouuee; water, two ounces. Carried in a cup through the apartments of the sick, or the apartments intended to be fumigated, where...
-1841. To Polish Enamelled Leather
Two pints of the best cream, one pint of linseed oil; make them each lukewarm, and then mix them well together. Having previously cleaned the shoe, etc, from dirt, rub it over with a sponge dipped in ...
-1842. Devonshire Juncket
Put warm milk into a bowl, turn it with a little rennet, then add some scalded cream, sugar and cinnamon on the top, without breaking the curd. ...
-1843. To Clean Buass Ornaments
Wash the brass work with roche alum boiled to a strong ley, in the proportion of an ounce to a pint. When dry, it must be rubbed with a fine tripoli. ...
-1844. To Renovate Silks
Sponge faded silks with warm water and soap, then rub them with a dry cloth on a flat board; afterwards iron them on the inside with a smoothing iron. Old black silks may be improved by sponging with ...
-1846. Boiled Turnip Radishes
Boil in plenty of salted water, and in about twenty-five minutes they will be tender; drain well, and send them to table with melted butter. Common radishes, when young, tied in bunches, boiled for tw...
-1847. To Remove Stains From Mourning Dresses
Boil a handful of fig leaves in two quarts of water until reduced to a pint. Bombazines, crape, cloth, etc, need only be rubbed with a sponge dipped in this liquor, and the effect will be instantly pr...
-1848. Iceland Moss Chocolate - For The Sick Room
Iceland moss has been in the highest repute on the continent as a most efficacious remedy in incipient pulmonary complaints; combined with chocolate, it will be found a nutritious article of diet, and...
-1849. A Hint On Household Management
Have you ever observed what a dislike servants have to anything cheap? They hate saving their master's money. I tried this experiment with great success the other day. Finding we consumed a vast deal ...
-1850. To Those Who Write For The Press
It would be a great favor to editors and printers, should those who write for the press observe the following rules. They are reasonable, and our correspondents will regard them as such: - 1. Write wi...
-1851. Diaphane
This is a beautiful, useful, and inexpensive art, easily acquired, and producing imitations of the richest and rarest stained glass; and also of making blinds, screens, skylights, Chinese lanterns, et...
-1864. Potichomanie
This elegant accomplishment, which has become so extremely popular and fashionable, promises not only to supersede altogether many of those meretricious accomplishments which have hitherto absorbed th...
-1876. Waxen Flowers And Fruit
There is no art more easily acquired, nor more encouraging in its immediate results, than that of modelling flowers and fruit in wax. We do not mean that it is easy to attain the highest perfection in...
-1876. Waxen Flowers And Fruit. Part 2
1895. With regard to the imitations of fruit in wax, very different rules are to be observed. The following directions are from a reliable source: - The material of which moulds for waxen fruit ...
-1876. Waxen Flowers And Fruit. Part 3
1902. For the first experiments, common yellow wax may be used as the material, or the ends of half-burnt wax-candles. The materials of the hard (not tallow) composition mould candles will also ...
-1905. To Colour The Wax
While the wax is yet on the hob, and fluid, stir into it a little flake white, in powder, and continue to stir the mixture while it is being'poured into the half mould. It will be found that unless th...
-1906. To Produce A Good Imitation Of The Surface
It will be noted by the close observer, that the shell of the common hen's egg has a number of minute holes, which destroy the perfect smoothness of its appearance. This peculiarity is imitated in the...
-1908. Feather Flowers
The art of making Feather Flowers, though a very easy and inexpensive accomplishment, and yielding pretty ornaments for the mantelpiece or the chiflioneer, is but little pursued. Many persons are unde...
-1908. Feather Flowers. Continued
1916. To Dye Feathers Blue Into two pennyworths of oil of vitriol, mix two pennyworths of the best indi go in powder; let it stand a day or two; when wanted shake it well and into a quart of boiling ...
-1925. Collecting And Laying Out Sea-Weeds
First wash the sea-weed in fresh water, then take a plate or dish (the larger the better), cut your paper to the size required, place it on the plate with fresh water, and spread out the plant with a ...
-1926. Dry Botanical Specimens For Preservation
The plants you wish to preserve should be gathered when the weather is dry, and after placing the ends in water, let them remain in a cool place till the next day. When about to be submitted to the pr...
-1929. Dwarf Plants
Take a cutting of the plant you wish to dwarf, Hay a myrtle, for instance, and having set it in a pot, wait until you are satisfied that it has taken root; then take a cutting from it, and place it in...
-1930. Preserve Fungi
Re-ceipt of the celebrated botanist, William Withering, Esq., by which specimens of fungi may be beautifully preserved. - Take two ounces of sulphate of copper, or blue vitriol, and reduce it to powde...
-1931. Modelling In Cork, Gutta Percha, Leather, Paper, Plaster Of Paris, Wax, Wood, Etc
Modelling, in a general sense, signifies the art of constructing an original pattern, which is to be ultimately carried out on an enlarged scale, or copied exactly. 1932. When models are constructed ...
-1941. To Model Caves In Cork
Construct the frame-work of wood, and fill up the outline with old be ale-corks. The various projections. he cesses, and other minutiae, must be affixed afterwards with glue, after being formed of cor...
-1957. Paper Cement
1. Reduce paper to a smooth paste by boiling it in water; then add an equal weight each of sifted whiting and good size; boil to a proper consistence, and use. 1958. 2. Take equal parts of paper, pa...
-1961. Cities And Temples
We will suppose that the model is to represent the Temple of Theseus, at Athens, which was built by Cimon, the son of Miltiades. In the first place we must obtain the necessary dimensions, and then re...
-1962. To Model From Living Objects
We will imagine that the reader desires to model the features of 6ome friend, and as there is some difficulty in the matter, on account of the person operated upon having a natural tendency to distort...
-1972. Baking, Boiling, Broiling, Frying, Roasting, Stewing, And Spoiling
A Dialogue between the Dutch Oven, the Sauce-pax, the Spit, the Gridiron, and the Frying-pan, with reflections thereupon, in which all housekeepers and cooks are invited to take an interest. 1973. We...
-1983. The Gridiron
The Gridiron, though the simplest of cooking instruments, is by so means to be despised. The Gridiron, as indeed all cooking utensils, should be kept scrupulously clean; and when it is used, the bars ...
-1987. The Saucepan
When we come to speak of the Saucepan, we have to consider the claims of a very large, ancient, and useful family; and perhaps, looking at the generic orders of the Saucepan, all other cooking impleme...
-2006. Cautions For The Prevention Of Accidents
The following regulations should be engraved on the memories of all: - 2007. As most sudden deaths come by water, particular caution is therefore necessary in its vrcinity. 2008. Stand not near a tr...
-2029. Birdlime
Take any quan tity of linseed oil, say half a pint; put it into an old pot, or any vessel that will stand the firo without breaking; the vessel must not be more than one-third full, put it on a slow f...
-2030. Ring Worm
The head to be washed twice a day with soft soap and warm soft water; when dried, the places to be rubbed with a piece of linen rag dipped in ammonia from gas tar; the patient should take a little sul...
-2031. Origin Of Plants
Madder came from the East. Celery originated in Germany. The chesnut came from Italy. - The onion originated in Egypt. Tobacco is a native of Virginia. The nettle is a native of Europe. The citr...
-2032. Love's Telegraph
If a gentleman wants a wife, he wears a ring on the first finger of the left hand; if he is engaged, he wears it on the second finger; if married, on the third; and on the fourth, if he never intends ...
-Garden Pests
2033. Slugs Slugs and SNAILS are great enemies to every kind of garden-plant, whether flower or vegetable; they wander in the night to feed, and return at day-light to their haurts; the shortest and ...
-2040. Small-Pox Marks
Mr Waddington lances the pustules with a needle, and thus allows the poisonous matter (which is the cause of the disfigurement) to escape, and also orders the room to be kept dark. Mr. Wad-dington sta...
-2041. Ventilating BedRooms
A sheet of finely-perforated zinc, substituted for a pane of glass in one of the upper squares of a chamber window, is the cheapest and best form of ventilator; there should not be a bed-room without ...
-2042. Grease Spots From Silk
Upon a deal table lay a piece of woollen cloth or baize, upon which lay smoothly the part stained, with the right side downwards. Having spread a piece of brown paper on the top, apply a flat-iron jus...
-2043. Clean White Ostrich Feathers
Four oz. of white soap, cut small, dissolved in four pints of water, rather hot, in a large basin; make the solution into a lather, by beating it with birch rods, or wires Introduce the feathers, and ...
-2045. Baldness
The decoction of boxwood, successful in cases of baldness, is thus made: - Take of the com-mon box, which grows in garden borders, stems and leaves four large handfuls; boil in three pints of water, i...
-2047. Breach Of Promise Of Marriage
A verbai offer of marriage is sufficient whereon to grouud an action for breach of promise of marriage. The conduct of the suitor, subsequent to the breaking off the engagement, would weigh with the j...
-2060. Yellow Rice
Take one pound of rice, wash it clean and put it into a saucepan which will hold three quarts; add to it half a pound of currants picked and washed, one quarter of an ounce of the best turmerio powder...
-2061. Neat Mode Of Soldering
Cut out a piece of tinfoil the size of the surfaces to be soldered. Then dip a feather in a solution of sal ammoniac, and wet over the surfaces of the metal, then place them in their proper position w...
-2062. Tracing Paper
Mix together by a gentle heat, one oz. of Canada balsam, and a-quarter pint of spirits of turpentine; with a soft brush .spread it thinly over one side of good tissue paper. It dries quickly, is very ...
-2063. Dye Silk, Etc, Crimson
Take about a spoonful of cutbear, put it into a small pan, pour boiling water upon it; stir and let it stand a few minutes, then put in the silk, and turn it over in a short time, and when the colour ...
-2064. Clean Kid Gloves
Make a strong lather with curd soap and warm water, in which steep a 6mall piece of new flannel. Place the glove on a flat, clean, and unyielding surface - such as the bottom of a dish, and having tho...
-2063. Prevent Galling In Invalids
The white of an egg, beaten to a strong froth, then drop in gradually whilst you are beating two teaspoonfuls of spirits of wine, put it into a bottle, and apply occasionally with a feather. ...
-2066. Mashed Potatoes And Spinach Or Cabbage
Moisten cold mashed potatoes with a little white sauce: take cold cabbage or spinach, and chop either one very finely. Moisten them with a brown gravy. Fill a tin mould with layers of potatoes and cab...
-2067. Cold Carrots And Turnips
Cold Carrots And Turnips may be added to soups, if they have not been mixed with gravies; or warmed up separately, and put into moulds in layers; they may be turned out, and served the same as the pot...
-2068. Raspberry Vinegar
Put a pound of very fine ripe raspberries in a bowl, bruise them well, and pour upon them a quart of the best white wine vinegar; next day strain the liquor on a pound of fresh ripe raspberries; brais...
-2070. Dew
If the dew lies plentifully on the grass after a fair day, it is a sign of another. If not, and there is no wind, rain must follow. A red evening portends fine weather; but if it spread too far upward...
-2071. Clouds
Against much rain, the clouds grow bigger, and increase very fast, especially before thunder. When the clouds are formed like fleeces, but dense in the middle and bright towards the edges, with the sk...
-2072. Heavenly Bodies
A haziness in the air, which fades the sun's light, and makes the orb appear whitish, or ill-defined - or at night, if the moon and stars grow dim, and a ring encircles the former, rain will follow. I...
-2073. Asthma
The following is recommended as a relief. - Two ounces of the best honey, and one ounce of castor oil mixed. A teaspoonful to be taken night and morning, ...
-2074. Mildew Out Of Linen
Take soap, and rub it well; then scrape some fine chalk, and rub it also on the linen. Lay it on the grass. As it dries, wet it a little, and it will come out in twice doing. ...
-2075. Excellent Remedy For Sprains
Put the white of an egg into a saucer, keep stirring it with a piece of alum about the size of a walnut until it becomes a thick jelly; apply a portion of it on a piece of lint or tow large enough to ...
-2076. Remedy For Rheumatism, Lumbago, Sprains, Bruises, Chilblains, (Before They Are Broken) And Bites Of Insects
One raw egg well beaten, half a pint of vinegar, one ounce of spirits of turpentine, a quarter of an an ounce of spirits of wine, a quarter of an ounce of camphor. These ingiedi-ents to be beaten well...
-2077. Unfermented Bread
Three pounds wheat meal; half an ounce, avoirdupois, muriatic acid; hall an ounce, avoirdupois, carbonate soda; water enough to make it of a proper consistence. For white flour, four pounds of flour; ...
-2078. Scurf In The Head
A simple and effectual remedy. Into a pint of water drop a lump of fresh quick lime, the size of a walnut; let it stand all night, then pour the water off clear from the sediment or deposit, add a qua...
-2079. Jaundice
One pennyworth of allspice, ditto of flour of brimstone, ditto of turmeric; these to be well pounded together, and afterwards to be mixed with half-a-pound of molasses. Two table-spoonfuls to be taken...
-2080. Cramp In The Legs
Stretch out the heel of the leg as far as possible, at the same time drawing up the toes as far as possible. This will often stop a fit of the cramp after it hag commenced. ...
-2081. Clean Furs
Strip the fur articles of their stuffing and binding, and lay them as much as possible in a flat position. They must then be subjected to a very brisk brushing, with a stiff clothes brush; after this,...
-2082. Whist
(Upon the principles of Hoyle's games). - Great silence and attention must be observed by the players. Four persons cut for partners; the two highest are against the two lowest. The partners sit oppos...
-2082. Whist. Part 2
2084. Rules 1. Lead from your strong suit, and be cautious how you change suits; and keep a commanding card to bring it in again. 2. Lead through the strong suit and up to the weak, but not in ...
-2082. Whist. Part 3
2087. Playing Out Of Turn 7. If any person play out of his turn, the adversary may call the card played at any time, if he do not make him revoke; or if either of the adverse party be to lead, may ...
-2082. Whist. Part 4
2092. Respecting Who Played A Particular Card 26. Each person ought to lay his card before him; and if either of the adversaries mix their caros with his, his partner may demand each person to lay ...
-2082. Whist. Part 5
2095. Second Hand 1. Having ace, king, and small ones, play a small card, if strong in tramps, but the king if weak in them; for, otherwise, your ace or king might be trumped, in the latter case, ...
-2082. Whist. Part 6
2097. Fourth Hand I. If a king be led, and you hold ace, knave, and a small card, play the small one; for, supposing the queen to follow, you probably make both ace and knave. 2. When the third ...
-2082. Whist. Part 7
2101. When You Turn Up An Honour 1. If you turn up an ace, and hold only one small trump with it, if either adversary lead the king, put on the ace. 2. But, if you turn up an ace, and hold two or ...
-2104. Cribbage
The game of Cribbage differs from all other games by its immense variety of chances. It is reckoned useful to young people in the science of calculation. It is played with the whole pack of cards, gen...
-2104. Cribbage. Continued
2107. Five-Card Cribbage It is unnecessary to describe cribbageboards; the sixty-one points or holes marked thereon make the game. We have before said, that the party cutting the lowest card deals; ...
-2113. All-Fours
All-Fours is usually played by two persons: not unfrequently by four Its name is derived from the four chances called high, low, Jack, game, each making a point. A complete pack of cards must be provi...
-2117. Domino
This game is played by two or four persons, with twenty-eight pieces of oblong ivory, plain at the back, but on the face divided by a black line in the middle, and indented with spots, from one to a d...
-2118. Loo
Loo, or lue, is subdivided into limited and unlimited loo, is a game the complete knowledge of which can easily be acquired; it is played two ways, both with five and three cards, though most commonly...
-1119. Put Game
The game of put is played with an entire pack of cards, generally by two but sometimes by four persons. At this game the cards have a different value from all others. The best card in the pack is a tr...
-2122. Speculation
Speculation is a noisy round game, at which several may play, using a complete pack of cards, bearing the same import as at whis, with fish or counters, on which such a value is fixed as the company m...
-2123. Connexions
Three or four persons may play at this game. If the former number, ten cards each are to be given; but if the latter, only eight are dealt, and bear the same import as at whist, except that diamonds a...
-2124. Pope Joan
Pope, a game somewhat similar to that of matrimony, is played by a number of people, who generally use a board painted for this purpose, which may be purchased at most turners' or toy shops. The eight...
-2125. Matrimony
The game of matrimony is played with an entire, pack of cards, by any number of persons from five to fourteen. It consists of five chances, usually marked on a board, or sheet of paper, as follows:- ...
-2126. Cassino
The game of cassino is played with an entire pack of cards, generally by four persons, but sometimes by three, and often by two. 2127. Terms Used In Cassino Great Cassino, the ten of diamonds, which...
-2129. Vingt-Un or Twenty-one Game
The game of Vingt-un, or twenty-one, may be played by two or more people; and, as the deal is advantageous, and often continues long with the same person, it is usual to determine it at the commenceme...
-2130. Quadrille Game
The game of Quadrille is played by four persons: and the number of cards required are forty; the four tens, nines, and eights, being discarded from the pack. The deal is made by distributing the cards...
-Quadrille Game. Part 2
Mille is a mark of ivory which is sometimes used, and stands for ten fish. Matadores, or matts, are spadille, manille, and basto, which are always the three best trumps. False mata-dores are any sequ...
-Quadrille Game. Rules For Learners
2133. Rules For Learners When you are the ombre, and your friend leads from a matt, play your best trumn. and then lead the next best the first opportunity. If you possess all the trumps, continue ...
-2134. Quinze
This game is usually played by only two persons, and is much admired for its simplicity and fairness, as it depends entirely upon chance, is soon decided, and does not require that attention which mos...
-2135. The Weather And The Blood
In dry, sultry weather the heat ought to be counteracted by means of a cooling diet. To this purpose, cucumbers, melons, and juicy fruit are subservient. We ought to give the preference to such alimen...
-2136. A Lemonade
A Lemonade, composed or two bottles of champagne, one bottle of seltzer water, three pomegranates, three lemons, and of sugar quantum sufficit, is a princely leverage in hot weather; only care must be...
-2137. Summer Champagne
To four parts of selter water add one of Moselle wine (or hock), and put a tea-spoonful of powdered sugar into a wine-glassful of this mixture; an ebullition takes place, and you have a sort of champa...
-2138. Our Attention
Our Attention ought to be directed to the means of thinning the blood, when it has been deprived by too profuse transpiration, in hot, dry winds, of its aqueous particles and rendered thick and viscid...
-2139. Substitute For The Foregoing
The yolk of eggs beaten up, lump sugar (quantum sufficit), Rhenish wine or not, citric acid, powdered, or tartaric acid (small quantity-exact quantity 60on found); one or two drops of essence of lemon...
-2140. Agreeable Effervescent Drink For Heart-Burn, Etc
Orange juice - (of one orange) water and lump sugar to flavor, and in proportion to acidity of orange, bicarbonate of soda, about half a tea-spoonful. Mix orange juice, water and sugar together in a t...
-2141. Deafness
Take three drops of a sheep's gall, warm, and drop it into the ear on going to bed. The ear must be thoroughly syringed with warm soap and water in the morning. The gall must be applied for three succ...
-2142. Sweeping Carpets
Persons who are accustomed to U6e tea leaves for sweeping their carpets, and find that they leave stains, will do well to employ fresh cut grass instead. It is better than tea leaves for preventing du...
-2143. The Rough And Ready Night-Cap, Made In A Moment, Costing Nothing, And Admira-Ble For Railway And Other Travellers
Take your pocket-handkerchief. and laying it out the full square, double down one-third over the other part. Then raise the whole and turn it over, so that the third folded down shall now be underneat...
-2144. Mock Goose (Being A Leg Of Pork Skinned, Roasted, And Stuffed Goose Fashion)
Parboil the leg; take off the skin, and then put it down to roast; baste it with butter, and make a savoury powder of finely minced or dried and powdered sage, ground black pepper, salt and some bread...
-2145. Tincture Of Lemon -Peel
A very easy and economical way of obtaining and preserving the flavour of Lemon-peel, is to fill a wide-mouthed pint bottle half full of brandy, or proof spirit; and when you use a lemon pare the rind...
-2146. Relishing Rashers Of Bacon
If you have any cold bacon, you may make a very nice dish of it by cutting it into slices about a quarter of an inch thick; grate some crust of bread as directed for ham, and powder them well with it ...
-2147. Rump-Steak Pie
Cut three pounds of rurnp-steak (that has been kept till tender) into pieces half as big as your hand, trim off all the skin, sinews, and every part which has not indisputable pretensions to be eaten,...
-2143. Raised Pies
Put two pounds and a half of flour on the pasteboard, - and put on the fire, in a saucepan, three quarters of a pint of water, and half a pound of good lard; - when the water boils, make a hole in the...
-2149. Relish For Chops, Etc
Pound fine an ounce of black pepper, and half an ounce of allspice, with an ounce of salt, and half an ounce of scraped horseradish, and the same of eschalots, peeled and quartered; put these ingredie...
-2150. Essence Of Mush-Room
This delicate relish is made by sprinkling a little salt over either flap or button mushrooms; - three hours after, mash them, - next day, strain off the liquor that will flow from them, put it into a...
-2151. Artificial Mushroom Beds
Mushrooms may be grown in pots, boxes, or hampers. - Each box may be three feet long, one and a half broad, and seven inches in depth. Let each box be half filled with horse-dung from the stables (the...
-2152. Goose Or Duck Stuffing
Chop very fine about two ounces of onion, of green sage leaves about an ounce (both unboiled), four ounces of bread-crumbs, a bit of butter about as big as a walnut, etc, the yolk and white of an egg,...
-2153. Roast Goose
When a goose is well picked, singed, and cleaned, make the stuffing with about two ounces of onion (if you think the flavour of raw onions too strong, cut them in slices, and lay them in cold water fo...
-2154. Sage And Onion, Or Goose-Stuffing Sauce
Chop very fine one ounce of onion and half an ounce of green sage leaves, put them into a stew-pan with four spoonfuls of water, simmer gently for ten minutes, then put in a tea-spoonful of pepper and...
-2155. Apple Sauce
Pare and core three good-sized baking apples, put them into a well-tinned pint saucepan, with two table-spoonfuls of cold water; cover the saucepan close, and set it on trivet over a slow fire a coupl...
-2156. Beef Gravy Sauce
(Or Brown Sauce, for Ragout, Game, Poultry, Fish, etc.,) - If you want gravy, furnish a thick and well-tinned stewpan with a thin slice of fat ham or bacon, or an ounce of butter, and a middling sized...
-2157. Beef Alamode And Veal Ditto
Take about eleven pounds of the mouse buttock, - or clod of beef, - or blade-bone, - or the sticking-piece, or the like weight of the breast of veal;-cut it into pieces of thrre or four ounces each; p...
-2158. Walnut Catsup
Take six half-sieves of green walnut shells, put them into a tub, mix them up well with common salt, from two to three pounds, let them stand for six days, frequently beating and mashing them; by this...
-Curious properties of the Number Nine
2159. Curious properties of the Number Nine. If any row of two or more figures be reversed and subtracted from itself, the figures composing the remainder, will, when added horizontally, be a ...
-Yeast
Boil, say on Monday morning, 2 oz. of the best hops in four quarts of water, for half-an-hour; strain it, and let the liquor cool down to new milk warmth; then put in a small handful of salt and half ...
-2161. Forcemeat Balls (For Turtle, Mock Turtle, Or Made Dishes)
Pound some veal in a marble mortar, rub it through a sieve with as much of the udder as you have veal, or about a third of the quantity of butter; - put some bread-crumbs into a stew-pan, mois-ten the...
-2162. Syrup Of Orange Or Lemon-Peel
Of fresh outer rind of Seville orange or lemon-peel, three ounces, apothecaries' weight; boiling water, a pint and a-half; infuse them for a night in a close vessel: then strain the liquor; let it sta...
-2163. Horseradish Vinegar
Pour a quart of best vinegar on three ounces of scraped horseradish, an ounce of minced eschalot, and one drachm of cayenne; let it stand a week, and you will have an excellent relish for cold beef, s...
-2164. Cress Vinegar
Dry and pound half an ounce of cress-send (such as is sown in the garden with mustard), pour upon it a quart of the best vinegars let it steep ten days, shaking it up every day. This is very strongly ...
-2165. Cocoanut Pie
Cut off the brown part of the cocoanut, grate the white part, and mix it with milk, and 6et it on the fire and let it boil slowly eight or ten minutes. To a pound of the grated cocoanut allow a quart ...
-2166. Serving A Fowl
A Nice Way of serving up a fowl that has been dressed. Beat the white of two eggs to a thick froth; add a small bit of butter, or some salad oil, flour, a little lukewarm water, and two tablespoonfuls...
-2167. Curry Powder
Curry Powder, (a genu ine Indian receipt.) - Turmeric, con-ander, black pepper, four ounces each: Fennigreek, three ounces; ginger, two ounces; cummin seed, ground rice, one ounce each; cayenne pepper...
-2170. Indian Syrup
{A delicious summer drink.) Five pounds of lump sugar, two ounces of citric acid, a gallon of boiling water: when cold add half a drachm of essence of lemon, and half a drachm of spirits of wine; stir...
-2171. Chutney
One pound of salt, one pound of mustard seed, one pound of stoned raisins, one pound of brown 6ugar, twelve ounces of garlic, six ounces of cayenne pepper, two quarts of unripe gooseberries, two quart...
-2172. Curing Of Hams And Bacon
It is simply to use the same quantity of common soda as saltpetre - one ounce and a half of each to the fourteen pounds of ham or bacon, using the usual quantity of salt. The soda prevents that hardne...
-Ointments
2173. Col. Birch's Receipt for rheumatic gout or acute rheumatism. - Half an ounce of nitre (sat-petre), half an ounce of sulphur, half an ounce of flower of mustard, half an ounce of Turkey rhubarb,...
-2179. Washing
{Supremacy of soap-suds over lime - (See 654 and 3668.) To save your linen and your labour. Pour on half a pound of soda two quarts of boiling water, in an earthenware pan; take half a pound of soap, ...
-2180. Leech Barometer
Take an eight ounce phial, and put in it three gills of water, and place in it a healthy leech, changing the water in summer once a week, and in winter once in a fortnight, and it will most accurately...
-2181. Life-Belts
An excellent and cheap life belt, for persons proceeding to sea, bathing in dangerous places, or learning to swim, may be thus made: - Take a yard and three-quarters of strong jean, double and divide ...
-2183. A Chattel Mortgage
A Chattel Mortgage, as it is technically called, must be filed in the town or city of the mortgager - (in this city at the register's). It must be accompanied by an immediate delivery of the property,...
-2184. Peas Powder
Pound in a marble mortar half an ounce each of dried mint and sage, a drachm of celery seed, and a quarter of a drachm of cayenne pepper; rub them together through a fine sieve. This gives a very savo...
-2185. Horseradish Powder
The time to make this is during November and December; slice it the thickness of a shilling, and lay it to dry very gradually in a Dutch oven (a strong heat soon evaporates its flavour); when dry enou...
-2186. Domestic Surgery
This will comprise such hints and advice as will enable any one to act on an emergency, or in ordinary trivial accidents requiring simple treatment; and also to distinguish between serious and simple ...
-2200. Bandages
Bandages are strips of calico, linen, flannel, muslin, elastic-webbing, bunting, or some other sub-stance of various lengths, sucli as three, four, eight, ten, or twelve yards, and one, one and a-half...
-2213. Bandages For The Foot
Place the end just above the outer ankle, and make two circular turns, to prevent its slipping; then bring it down from the inside of the foot over the instep towards the outer part; pass it under the...
-2223. Apparatus
When a person receives a severe contusion of the leg or foot, or breaks his leg, or has painful ulcers over the leg, or is unable from some cause to bear the pressure of the bedclothes, it is advisabl...
-2226. Minor Operations
Bleeding is sometimes necessary at once in certain accidents, such as concussion, and therefore it is well to know how to do this. First of all, bind up the arm above the elbow with a piece of bandage...
-2229. Leeches And Their Application
The leech used for medical purposes is called the hirudo Medicinalis, to distinguish it from other varieties, such as the horse-leech and the Lisbon leech. It varies from two to four inches in length,...
-2238. Accidents
Always send off for a surgeon immediately an accident occurs, but treat as directed until he arrives. Burns - If the skin is much injured, spread some linen pretty thickly with chalk ointment (979), a...
-2245. Cuts And Wounds
Cut thin strips of sticking-plaster, and bring the parts together: or if large and deep, cut two broad pieces so as to look like the teeth of a comb, and place one on each side of the wound, which mus...
-2247. Contusions
When they are very severe, lay a cloth over the part, and suspend a basin over it filled with cold lotion. (969, 970.) Put a piece of cotton into the basin, so that it shall allow the lotion to drop o...
-2261. Poisons, General Observations
The abbrevialioni used are as follows: - E. effects or symo toms. 7'. treatment. A. antidotes on counter-poisons. D. A. dangerous an tidotes. A poison is a substance which is capable of altering, or ...
-2266. Arsenic
( White arsenic; Orpintent, or yellow arsenic; realgar, red arsenic; Schecle's green, or arsenite of copper; king's yellow; ague drops; and arsenical paste)-E. Little or no taste. Within an hour heat ...
-2267. Copper (Blue Vitriol, Or Blue Stone; Verdigrisi; Verditer;. Verdigrisi Crystals)
E. An acid, rough, disagreeable taste in the mouth; a dry, parched tongue, with sense of strangling in the throat- coppery eructations; frequent spitting; nausea; fr?auent desire and effort to vomit, ...
-2268. Mercury( Corrosive Sublimate; Calomel; Red Precipitate; Vermillion; Turpeth Mineral; Prussiatc Of Mercury)
E. Acid metallic taste; tightness aud burning in the throat; pain in the back part of the mouth, stomach, and bowels; anxiety of countenance; nausea and vomiting of bloody and bilious fluids; profuse ...
-2269. Antimony (Tartar Emetic , Butter Of; Kermes Mineral)
E. A rough metallic taste in the mouth, nausea, copious vomitings, frequent hiccough, purging, colicky pains, frequent and violent cramps, sense of choking, se vere heartburn, pain at the pit of the s...
-2270. Tin
(Butter of tin; putty p.uder) - E. Colic and purging. - A. Milk. - T. Give warm or cold water to promote vomiting, or tickle the throat with a feather. ...
-2271. Zinc
(White Vitriol; flowers of; chloride of) - E. An astringent taste, sensation of choking, nausea, vomiting, purging, pain and burning in the throat and stomach, difficult breathing, pallor and coldness...
-2272. Silver. ( Lunar Caustic; Flowers Of Silver.)
Gold (Chloride of); and BISMUTH (nitrate; flowers of; pearl white), are not frequently met with as poisons. E. Burning pain in the throat, mouth, and the usual symptoms of corrosive poisons - A. For ...
-2273. Acids
(Hydrochloride or spirit of salt; nitric or aquafortis; sulphuric or oil of vitriol) - E. Acid burning taste, acute pain in the gullet and throat, vomiting of bloody fluid, which effervesces when chal...
-2274. Chlorine (Gas)
E. Violent coughing, tightness of the chest, debility, inability to stand - A. The vapour of caustic ammonia to be inhaled, or 10 drops of liquid ammonia to one ounce of water to be taken - T. Dash co...
-2275. Lead (Sugar Of; Red Lead; Wine Sweetened By; And Water Impregnated With)
E. Sugary astringent metallic taste, tightness of the throat, colicky ,paius,violent vomiting, hiccough, convulsions and death - A. Epsom or Glauber's salts; plaster of Paris; or phosphate of soda - T...
-2275. Phosphorus
E. Intense burning and pain in the throat and stomach - A. magnesia and carbonate of soda - T. Large draughts of cold water, and tickle the throat with a feather. Caution - Do not give oil or milk. ...
-2276. Lime
E. Burning in the throat and stomach, cramps in the belly, hiccough, vomiting, and paralysis of limbs - A. Vinegar or lemon juice -T. Thin starch water to be drunk frequently ...
-2278. Alkalies (Caustic; Potash, Soda; Ammonia)
E. Acrid, hot, disagreeable taste; burning in the throat, nausea, and vomiting bloody matter, profuse purging, pain in the stomach, colic, convulsions, and death - A. Vinegar and vegetable acids - T. ...
-2280. Nitre
E. Heartburn, nausea, violent vomiting, purging, convulsions, difficult breathing, violent pain in the bowels, and death - T. (See Arsenic.) ...
-2281. Narcotic Poisons (Bane Berries; Fool's Parsley; Deadly Nightshade; Water Hemlock; Thorn Apple; Opium; Cam' Phor, ≪Etc.)
E. Giddiness, faintnesa nausea, vomiting, stupor, delirium, and death - T. Give emetics, large draughts of fluids, tickle the throat, apply smelling salts to the nose, dash cold water over the face an...
-2282. Vegetable Irritating Poi-Sons
Mezereon; monk's-hood; bitter apple; gamboge; white hellebore, etc -L. Acrid, biting, bitter taste, choking sensation, dryness of the throat, retching, vomiting, purging, pains in the stomach and bowe...
-2283. Oxalic Acid
E. Vomiting and acute pain in the stomach, general debility, cramps, and death - A. Chalk - T. Give large draughts of lime-water or magnesia. ...
-2284. Spanish Flies
E. Acid taste, burning heat in the throat, stomach, and belly; bloody vomitings, colic, purging, retention of urine, convulsions, death - T. Large draughts of olive oil, thin gruel, milk, starch enema...
-2285. Poisonous Fish
Old-wife; sea-lobster; mussel; tunny; blower; rock-fish, etc - E. Intense pain in the stomach after swallowing the fish, vomiting, purging, and sometimes cramps - T. Give an emetic, excite vomiting by...
-2286. Bites Of Reptiles
Vipar: black viper; Indian serpents; rattle-snake - E. Violent and quick inflammation of the part, extending towards the body, soon becoming livid; nausea, vomiting, convulsions, difficult breathing, ...
-2287. Mad Animals, Bite Of
E. Hydrophobia, or a fear of fluids - T. Tie a string tightly over the part, cut out the bite, and cauterize the wound with a red-hot poker, lunar caustic, or Sir Wm. Burnett's Disinfecting Fluid. The...
-2288. Insect Stings
Wasp, bee, gnat, hornet, gad-jly, scorpion - E. Swelling, nausea, and fever - T. Press the barrel of a watch-key over the part, so as to expose the sting, which must be removed. Lay a rag moistened wi...
-2289. Oyster Catsup
Take fine fresh oysters; wash them in their own liquor, skim it, pound them in a marble mortar, to a pint of oysters add a pint of sherry, boil them up, and add an ounce of salt, two drachms of pounde...
-2290. Ox-Cheek Stewed
Pre-pare the day before it is to be eaten; cloaw the cheek and put it into soft water, just warm; let it lie throe or four hours, then put it into cold water, and let it soak all night; next day wipe ...
-2291. Children And Cut-Lery
Serious accidents having occurred to babies, through their catching hold of the blades of sharp instruments, the following hint will be useful. If a child lays hold of a knife or razor, do not try to ...
-2292. Coffee Milk
for the sick room. - Boil a dessert-spoonful of ground coffee, in nearly a pint of milk, a quarter of an hour, then put into it a shaving or two of isinglass, and clear it; let it boil a few minutes a...
-2293. Freckles
To disperse them, take one ounce of lemon juice, a quarter of a drachm of nowdered borax, and half a drachm of sugar; mix them, and let them stand a few days in a; bottle till the liquor is fit for (M...
-2294. Chloroforming Bees
The quantity of chloroform required for an ordinary hive is the sixth parte an ounce; a very large hive may take nearly a quarter of an ounce. Set down a table opposite to, and about four feet distant...
-2295. Arnica For Bites
A correspondent says:-Noticing an account of the death of a man from the bite of a cat, I beg to trouble you with the following case, which occurred to myself; - I took a strange dog home, which prod...
-2296. A Very Pleasant Perfume
A Very Pleasant Perfume, and also preventative against moths, may be made of the following ingredients: - Take of cloves, carraway seeds, nutmeg, mace, cinnamon, and Tonquin beans, of each one ounce; ...
-2297. Maps And Charts
Maps, charts, or engravings may be effectually varnished by running a very delicate coating of guttapercha solution over their surface. It is perfectly transparent, and is said to improve the appearan...
-2298. Cement For Leather And Cloth
An adhesive material for uniting the parts of boots and shoes, and for the seams of articles of clothing, may be made thus: - Take one pound of gutta percha, four ounces of India rubber, two ounces of...
-2299. Artificial Manners
Artificial manners, and such as spring from good taste and refinement, can rever be mistaken, and differ as widely as gold and tinsel. How captivating is gentleness of manner derived from true humilit...
-2300. Decoction Of Sarsaparilla
Take four ounces of the root, slice it down, put the slices into four pints of water, and simmer for four hours. Take out the sarsaparilla, and beat it into a mash; but it into the liquor again, and b...
-2301. Hot Water
In bruises, hot water is most efficacious, both by means of insertion and fomentation, in removing pain, and totally preventing discolouration and stiffness. It has the same effect after a blow. It sh...
-2302. Preserving Potatoes
The preservation of potatoes by lipping them in boiling water is a valable and useful discovery. Large quantities may be cured at once, by putting them into a basket as large as the vessel containing ...
-2303. Squinting
Squinting frequently arises from the unequal strength Of the eyes, the weaker eye being-turned away from the object, to avoid the fatigue of exertion. Cases of squinting of long standing have often be...
-2304. Scratches
Trifling as scratches often seem, they ought never to be neglected, but should be covered end protected, and kept clean and dry, until they have completely healed. If there is the least appearance of ...
-2305. Black Or White Elderberry Wine
Gather the berries ripe and dry, prick them, bruise them with your hands, and strain them. Set the liquor by in glazed earthen vessels for twelve hours to settle; put to every pint of juice a pint and...
-2306. Dry Cough
Take of powdered gum-arabic, half an ounce; liquorice-juice, half an ounce. Dissolve the gum first in warm water squeeze in the juice of a lemon, then add of paregoric two drachms; syrup of squills, o...
-2307. Clean White Veils
Put the veil in a solution of white soap and let it simmer a quarter of an hour squeeze it in some warm water ant3 soap till quite clean. Rin6e it from soap, and then in clean cold water, in which is ...
-2303. Canaries
To distinguish a cock-bird from a hen, observe the bird when it is singing, and if it be a cock you will perceive the throat heav ing with a pulse-like motion, a peculiar ity which is scarcely percept...
-2311. Bullfinches
Old birds should be fed with German Paste No. 2, and occasionally rape-seed. The Germans occasionally give them a little poppy-seed, and a grain or two of rice, steeped in Canary wine, when teaching t...
-2312. Squirrels
In a do-mestic state there little animals are fed with hazel nuts, or indeed any kind of nuts; and occasionally bread and milk. They should be kept very Clean. ...
-2313. Linnets
Cock-birds are browner on the back than the hens, and have some of the large feathers of the wings white up to the quills. Canary 'and hemp-seed, with occasion-ally a little groundsel, water-cress, ch...
-2314. Thrushes
A Cock may be distinguished from a hen by a darker back and the more glossy appearance of the feathers. The belly also is white. Their natural food is insects, worms, and snails. In a domesticated sta...
-2315. Wines From Rhubarb, Grapes (Unripe), Currants, Gooseberries, Etc
The whole art of wine-making consists in the proper management of the fermentation process; the same quantity of fruit, whether it be rhubarb, currants, gooseberries, grapes (unripe), leaves, tops, an...
-2316. Convulsions
Dr. Williamson, reports an interesting and remarkable case, in which he saved the life of an infant in convulsions, by the use of chloroform. He commenced the use of it at nine o'clock one evening, at...
-2317. Corns
Boil a potato in its skin, and after it is boiled take the skin and put the inside of it to the corn, and leave it on for about twelve hours; at the end of that period the corn will be much better. Th...
-2318. Cleansing Feathers Of Their Animal Oil
The following receipt gained a premium from the Society of Arts: - Take for every gallon of clean water one pound of quicklime, mix them well together and when the undissolved lime is precipitated in ...
-2319. Preston Salts
Take of sal ammoniac and salts of tartar, of each about two ounces; pound up the sal ammoniac into small bits, and mix them gently with the salts of tartar. After being well mixed, add a few drops of ...
-2320. Fig-Pudding
Three-quarters of a pound of grated bread, half a pound of best figs, six ounces of suet, six ounces of moist sugar, a tea-cupful of milk, and a little nutmeg. The figs and suet must be chopped very f...
-2321. Preserving Eggs
It has been long known to housewives, that the great secret of preserving eggs fresh, is to place the small end down-wards, and keep it in that position - other requisites not being neglected, such as...
-2322. Gum Arabic Starch
Take two ounces of white gum arabic powder, put it into a pitcher, and pour on it a pint or more of boiling water (according to the degree of strength you desire), and then, having covered it, let it ...
-2323. Home-Made Bread
To one quartern of flour (three pounds and a-half), and a dessert-spoonful of salt, and mix them well; mix about two table spoonfuls of good fresh yeast (see 2160) with half-a-pint of water a little w...
-2324. To Make Bread With German Yeast
To one quartern of flour add a dessert-spoonful of salt as before; dissolve one ounce of dried German yeast in about three table-spoonfuls of cold water, add to this one pint and a half of water a lit...
-2325. Pickling
There are three metheds of pickling; the most simple is, merely to put the article into cold vinegar. The strongest pickling vinegar of white wine should always be used for pickles; and for such as ar...
-2328. French Beans
The best sort for this purpose are white runners. They are very large, long beans, but should be gathered quite young, before they are half grown; they may be done in the same way as gherkins, but wil...
-2329. Onions
Onions should be chosen about the 6ize of marbles, the silver-skinned sort are the best. Prepare a brine and put them into it hot; let them remain one or two days, then drain them, and, when quite dry...
-2330. Red Cabbage
Choose fine linn cabbages: the largest are not the best: trim off the outside leaves; quarter the cabbage, take out the large stalk, slice the quarters into a colander, and sprinkle a little salt betw...
-2331. Garlic And Eschalots
Garlic and eschalots may be pickled in the same way as onions. 2332. Melons, Mangoes, and Long Cucumbers may all be done in the same manner. Melons should not be much more than half grown; cucumbers ...
-2333. Cauliflower
Choose such as are firm, yet of their full size; cut away all the leaves, and pare the stalk, pull away the flowers by bunches, steep in brine two days, then drain them; wipe them dry and put them int...
-2334. Walnuts
Be particular in obtaining them exactly at the proper season; if they go beyond the middle of July, there is danger of their becoming hard and woody. Steep them a week in brine. If they are wanted to ...
-2335. Beet-Roots
Boil or bake gently until they are nearly done; ac cording to the size of the root, they will require from an hour and a half to two hours; drain them, and when they begin to cool peel and cut in slic...
-2336. Artichokes
Gather young artichokes as soon as formed; throw them into boiling brine, and let them boil two minutes; drain them; when cold and dry put them in jars, and cover with vinegar, prepared as in method t...
-2338. Mushrooms
Choose small white mushrooms; they should be but one night's growth. Cut off the roots and rub the mushrooms clean with a bit of flannel and salt; put them in ajar, allowing to every quart of mushroom...
-2339. Samphire
On the sea-coast this is merely preserved in water, or equal parts of sea-water and vinegar; but as it is sometimes sent fresh as a present to inland parts, the best way of managing it under such circ...
-2340. Indian Pickle
The vegetables to be employed for this fa-vourite pickle are small hard knots of white cabbage sliced, cauliflowers or brocoli in flakes, long carrots, not larger than a finger, or large carrots slice...
-2342. Blackbirds
The cock bird is of a deep black, with a yellow bill. The female is dark drown. It is difficult to distinguish male from female birds when young; but the darkest generally are males. Their food consis...
-2343. Skylarks
The cock is recognized by the largeness of his eye, the length of his claws, the mode of erecting his crest, and by marks of white in the tail. It is also a larger bird than the hen. The cage should ...
-2344. Corns
The cause of corns is simply friction; and to lessen the friction you have only to use your toe as you do a coach-wheel - lubricate it with some oily substance. The best and cleanest thing to use is a...
-2345. Hints On Etiquette
There are numberless writers upon this subject, from Chesterfield to Willis, but the great fault with all of them is, that their works are designed exclusively for the bon ton. They are very well for ...
-2354. Laws Of Chess
The rules given below are based upon the code published in IValkcrs Art of Chess Play. The word piece frequently includes the pawn. 2355. I. If the board or pieces be improperly placed, or are defi...
-2385. Hints Upon Money Matters
Have a supply of change in hand. This will obviate the various incon. veniences of keeping people at the door, sending out at unreasonable times, and running or calling after any inmate in the house, ...
-2387. Adulterations
Much has been written upon the subject of adulteration. Somebody (whose name we forget) took up the subject prior to Dr. Hassall; Dr. Hassall wrote a series of papers in the Lancet; these brought abou...
-2387. Adulterations. Continued
2389. Difficulty Of Detecting Adulterations It is obvious, that if adulterations could be easily discovered, tradespeople who resorted to them would soon suffer from discredit. Many of the ...
-2397. Bread Adulteration
Grind your own wheat, make your own yeast, and bake your own bread (See 113, 587, 2077, 2160, 2323). The advantages will be immense, and you need not then trouble about adulterations. 2398. The Adult...
-2404. Cayenne Pepper
Having: four own pestle and mortar, make it according to the instructions given (2165), which are excellent. Let a quantity be made at one time for the Family Circle. The cayenne of commerce is adul...
-2405. Chicory
This is the dried and roasted root of a plant allied to the dandelion, and it is found by almost unanimous testimony to be an agreeable flavourer of coffee. Dr. Hassall denounces the use of chicory, b...
-2406. Chocolate And Cocoa
The adulterations of these articles pointed out by Dr. Hassall are not of a serious nature, being confined to flour, starch, potato-farina, sago-meal, wheat-flour, tapioca-starch, Maranta, and other a...
-2407. Coffee
Coffee is adulterated with chicory, roasted beans, peas, and acorns; bat chiefly by chicory. Having your own mill, buy the roasted beans; find out a respectable grocer, ascertain his roasting-days, an...
-2412 Isinglass
Our chief object in roticing the adulteration of this article is to insure its purity in the making of cements, which is of the utmost importance. (-See 78.) Isinglass is a' preparation from fishes' b...
-2418. Plckles And Preserves
These are found to be adulterated with various compounds; but the greatest evil lies in the fact that they are frequently impregnated with copper. In the case of preserves, the copper probably proceed...
-2422. Sausages
The most offensive of all adulterations is found in these savory morsels. Horseflesh, diseased animals, and odds and ends of every description, find their way into the tempting guise of sausages. To...
-2430. Pork, Spare-Rib
Joint it nicely before roasting, and crack the ribs across as lamb. Take care not to have the fire too fierce. It should be basted with very little butter and flour, and may be sprinkled with dried sa...
-2431. Custard (Baked)
Boil in a pint of milk a few coriander seeds, a little cinnamon and lemon-peel, sweeten with four ounces of loaf sugar, mix with it a pint of cold milk; beat eight eggs for ten minutes; add the other ...
-2432. Vermicelli Soup
Take in the proportions of three quarts of gravy soup, o' stock, to six ounces of vermicelli. Simmer for half an hour, stir frequently. ...
-2433. Apples
Apples for keeping should be laid out on a dry floor for three weeks. They then may be packed away in layers, with dry straw between them. Each apple should be rubbed with a dry cloth as it is put awa...
-2434. Gingerbread Aperient
Gingerbread, made with oat meal or with barley flour, is a very agreeable aperient for children. Beware of giving children medicines too frequently. ...
-2435. Evening Pastime
Among the innocent recreations of the fireside, there are few more commendable and practicable than those afforded by what are severally termed Anagrams, Charades, Conundrums Enigmas, Puzzles, Rebuses...
-2437. Conundrums
These are simple catches, in which the sense is playfully cheated, and are generally founded upon words capable of double meaning. The following are examples:- Where did Charles the First's execution...
-2440. Acted Charades
Adrawing-room with folded doors is the best for the purpose. Various household appliances are employed to fit up something like a stage, and to supply the fitting scenes Characters dressed in costume,...
-2440. Acted Charades. Part 2
Iron-mould I-sin-glass Jaco-bite Joy-ful Joy-less Justice-ship Key-stone Kid-nap King-craft King-fisher Kins-man Kit-ten Knight-hood Know-ledge Lace-man Lady-bird Lady-ship Lamp-black...
-2440. Acted Charades. Part 3
Prop-a-gate Punch-bowl Quad-rant Quench-less Quick-lime Quick-sand Quick-set Quick-silver Rain-bow Ram-pant Ran-sack Rap-a-city Rasp-berry Rattle-snake Rare-house Red-breast Red den R...
-Enigmas
2442. Enigmas are compositions of a different character, based upon ideal rather than upon words, and frequently constructed so as to mislead, and to surprise when the solution is made known. Enigmas ...
-Rebuses
2443. Rebuses are a class of enigmas generally formed by the first, sometimes the first and last, letters of words, or of transpositions of letters, or additions to words. Dr. Johnson, how-over, ...
-Puzzles
2444. Puzzles vary very much. One of the simplest that we know is this: - Take away half of thirteen, and let eight remain. Write XIII on a slate, or on a piece of paper-rub out the lower half of ...
-2445. Beds For The Poor
Beech-tree leaves are recommended for filling the beds of poor persons. They should be gathered on a dry day in the autumn, and perfectly dried. It is said that they smell grateful, and will not harbo...
-2446. Plum Or Apricot Jam
After taking away the stones from the apricots, and cutting out any blemishes they may have, put them over a slow fire, in a clean stew-pan, with half a pint of water: when scalded, rub them through a...
-2447. Covering For Preserves
White paper, cut to a suitable size, dipped in brandy, and put over the preserves when cold, and then a double paper tied over the top. All preserves should stand a night before they are covered. (See...
-2448. Arrack (Imitative)
Dissolve two scruples of flowers of benjamin in a quart of best rum, and it will impart to it the fragrance of arrack. ...
-2449. Arrowroot Blanc-Mange
A tea cupful of arrowroot to a pint of milk; boil the milk with twelve sweet and six bitter almonds, blanched and beaten; sweeten with loaf sugar, and strain it; break the arrowroot with a little of t...
-2450. Artichokes
Soak them in cold water, wash them well; put them into plenty of boiling water, with a handful of salt, and let them boil gently for an hour and a half or two hours; trim them and drain on a sieve; se...
-2452. Asparagus (Often Miscalled Uasparagrass")
Scrape the stalks till they are clean; throw them into a pan of cold water, tie them up in bundles, of about a quarter of a hundred each; cut off the stalks at the bottom all of a length, leaving enou...
-2453. Apple Puddings
One pound of flour, six ounces of very finely-minced beef suet; roll thin, and fill with one pound and a quarter of boiling apples: add grated rind and strained juice of a small lemon, tie it in a clo...
-2454. Apples In Syrup
Pare and core some hard apples, and throw them into a basin of water; as they are done, clarify as much loaf sugar as will cover them; put the apples in along with the juice and rind of a lemon, and l...
-2455. Vapour Baths
Vapour Baths may be made by putting boiling water in a pan, and placing-a cane bottom chair in the pan, the patient sitting upon it, enveloped from head to foot in a blanket covering the bath. Sulphur...
-2456. Barley Broth (Scotch)
Dr. Kitchener, from whose Cook's Oracle ' we take this receipt, after testing it, says:-This is a most frugal, agree able, and nutritive meal. It will neither lighten the puree nor lie heavy on the s...
-2457. Drying Herbs
Fresh herbs are preferable to dried ones, but as they cannot always be obtained, it is most important to dry herbs at the proper seasons:- - 2458. Basil is in a fit state for drying about the middle ...
-2474. Ginger Biscuits And Cakes
Work into small crumbs three ounces of butter, two pounds of flour; add three ounces of powdered sugar and two of ginger, in fine pow der, knead into a stiff paste, with new milk, roll thin, cut out w...
-2475. Brown Stock
Brown Stock may be made from all sorts of meat, bones, remnants of poultry, game, etc. The shin of beef makes an excellent stock. 2476. Brown Stock Put five pounds of shin of beef, three pounds of k...
-2477. Brown Gravy
Three onions sliced, and fried in butter to a nice brown; toast a large thin slice of bread a considerable time until quite hard and of a deep brown. Take these, with any piece of meat, bone, etc, and...
-2478. Clear Gravy Soup
This may be made from shin of beef, which should not be large or coarse. The meat will be found serviceable for the table. From ten pounds of the meat let the butcher cut off five or six from the thic...
-2479. Beef Extract (As Recommended By Baron Liebig)
Take a pound of good juicy beef, from which all the skin and fat has been cut away, chop it up like sausage-meat; mix it thoroughly with a pint of cold water, place it on the side of the stove to heat...
-2480. Beef Tea
The above, by adding water, forms the best beef tea, or broth, for invalids. ...
-2481. Asparagus Soup
Two quarts of good beef or veal steak, four onions, two or three turnips, soma sweet herbs, and the white parts of a hundred young asparagus; if old, halt that quantity; and. let them simmer till fit ...
-2482. Bacon
Dr. Kitchener very justly says: - The boiling of bacon is a very simple subject to comment upon; but our main object is to teach common cooks the art of dressing common food in the best manner. Cover ...
-2484. Ham Or Bacon Slices
Ham Or Bacon Slices should not be more than one-eighth of an inch thick, and, for delicate persons, should be soaked in hot water for a quarter of an hour, and then well wiped and dried before broilin...
-2485. Picnic Biscuits
Take two ounces of fresh butter, and well work it with a pound of flour. Mix thoroughly with it half a salt-spoonful of pure carbonate of soda; two ounces of sugar; mingle thoroughly with the flour; m...
-2486. Black Paper Patterns
Mix some lamp-black with sweet oil. With a piece of flannel cover sheets of writing-paper with the mixture; dab the paper dry with a bit of fine linen. When using put the black side on another sheet o...
-2488. Black Silk Reviver
Boil logwood in water half an hour; then simmer the silk half an hour; take it out, and put into the dye a little blue vitriol, or green copperas; cool it and simmer the silk for half an hour. Or, boi...
-2489. Blackberries
Blackberries are very beneficial in cases of dysentery. The berries are healthful eating. Tea made of the roots and leaves is good , and syrup made from the berries excellent. ...
-2490. Blackberry Wine
Gather when ripe, on a dry day. Put into a vessel, with the head out, and a tap fitted near the bottom; pour on them boiling water to cover them. Mash the berries with your hands, and let them stand c...
-2191. Blac King For Leather Beats, Etc
Beat well the yolks of two eggs and the white of one; mix a table spoonful of gin and a tea-spoonful of sugar, thicken it with ivory black, add it to the eggs, and use as common blacking; the seats or...
-2492. Bleaching Straw Bonnets
Bleaching Straw Bonnets, etc - Wash them in pure water, scrubbing them with a brush. Then put them into a box in which has been set a saucer of burning sulphur. Cover them up, so that the fumes may bl...
-2494. Birds, Quadrupeds, Etc, For Stuffing
Large animals should be carefully skinned with the horns, skull, tail, hoofs, etc., entire. Then rub the inside of the skin thoroughly with a mixture of salt, pepper, and alum, and hang up to dry. Lar...
-2498. Boots And Shoes
Boots And Shoes should be cleaned frequently, whether they are worn or not, and should never be put to stand in a damp place, nor be put too near the fire to dry. In cleaning, be careful to brush the ...
-2500. Cleaning Bottles
There is no easier method of cleaning glass bottles than putting into them fine coals, and well shaking, either with water or not, hot or cold, according to the substance that fouls the bottle. Charco...
-2501. Blond Lace
Blond Lace may be revived by breathing upon it, and shaking and flapping it. The use of the iron turns the lace yellow. ...
-2502. Boards To Scour
Lime, one part, sand, three parts, soft-soap, two parts. Lay a little on the boards with the scrubbing brush, and rub thoroughly. Rinse with clean water, and rub dry. This will keep the boards of a go...
-2503. Biles
These should be brought to a head by warm poultices of chamomile flowers, or boiled white lily root, or onion root; by fermentation with hot water, or by stimulating plasters. When ripe, they should b...
-2504. Dying Bonnets
Chips and straw bonnets or hats may be dyed black by boiling them three or four hours in a strong liquor of logwood, adding a little green copperas occasionally. Let the bonnets remain in the liquor a...
-2505. Bottling And Fining
Corks should be sound, clean, and sweet. Beer and porter should be allowed to stand in the bottles a day or two before corked. of for speedy use, wiring is not necessary. Laying the bottles on their s...
-2506. Preserved Peaches
Wipe, and pick the fruit, and have ready a quarter of the weight of fine sugar in powder. Put the fruit into an ice-pot that shuts very close; throw the sugar over it, and then cover the fruit with br...
-2507. Batter Pudding, Baked Or Boiled
Six ounces fine flour, a little salt, and three eggs; beat well with a little milk, added by degrees until it is the thickness of cream; put into a butter-dish; bake three-quarters of an hour; or if b...
-2508. Apple Dumplings
Paste the same as for apple pudding, divide into as many pieces as dumplings are required; peel and core the apples; roll out your paste large enough; put in the apples; close the dumplings, tie them ...
-2509. Dried Apples
Dried Apples are produced by taking fine apples of good quality, and placing them in a, very slow oven for several hours. Take them out occasionally, rub and press them flat. Continue until they are d...
-2510. Tomato, Or Love Apple Sauce
Twelve tomatos, ripe and red; take off the stalk; cut in halves; squeeze enough to get all the water and seeds out; put in a stew-pan with a capsicum, and two or three table-spoonful of beef gravy; Be...
-2511. Apple Pie
Pare, core, and quarter the apples; boil the cores and parings in sugar and water; strain off the liquor, adding more sugar; grate the rind of a lemon over the apples, and squeeze the juice into the s...
-2512. Barley Water
Pearl barley, two ounces; wash till freed from dust, in cold water. Boil in a quart of water a few minutes, strain off the liquor, throw it away. Then boil the barley in four pints and a half of water...
-2513. Apple Fritters
Peel and core some fine pippins, and cut into slices. Soak them in wine, sugar, and nutmeg, for a few hours. Batter of four eggs, to a table-spoonful of rose-water, a table-spoonful of wine, and a tab...
-2514. Apple Water
A tart apple well baked and mashed; on which pour a pint of boiling water. Beat up, cool, and strain. Add sugar if desired. Cooling drink for sick persons. ...
-2515. Iron And Steel Goods From Rust
Dissolve half an ounce of camphor in one pound of hog's lard; take off the scum; mix as much black lead as will give the mixture an iron colour. Iron and steel goods, rubbed over with this mixture, an...
-2516. Arrowroot Jelly
A table-spoonful of arrow-root, and cold water to form a paste; add a pint of boiling water; stir briskly, boil a few minutes. A little sherry and sugar may be added. For infants, a drop or two of the...
-2517. Accidents In Carriages
It is safer as a general rule, to keep your place, than to jump out. Getting out of a gig over the back, provided you can hold on a little while, and run, is safer than springing from the side. But it...
-2518. Restoring Colour To Silk
When the colour has been taken from silk by acids, it may be restored by applying to the spot a little hartshorn, or salvolatile. ...
-2519. Alabaster
For cleaning it there is nothing better than soap and water. Stains may be removed by washing with soap and water, then white-washing the stained part, letting it stand some hours, then washing oft th...
-Mulled Wines
2520. Bishop Bishop is mulled wine, made with Burgundy. 2521. Cardinal Cardinal is mulled wine, made with old Rhenish wine. 2522. Pope Pope is mulled wine, made with Tokay wine. ...
-2523. Almond Custards
Blanch and pound fine, with half a give of rose water, six ounces of sweet, and half an ounce of bitter almonds, boil a pint of milk, with a few coriander seeds, a little cinnamon and lemon peel; swee...
-2524. Sponge Cake
Take equal weight of egg and sugar; half their weight in sifted flour; to twelve eggs, add the grated rind of three lemons, and the juice of two. Beat the eggs carefully, white and yolks separately, b...
-2526. Boston Apple Pudding
Peel and core one dozen and a half of good apples; cut them small; put them into a stew-pan with a little water, cinnamon, two cloves, and the peel of a lemon; stew over a slow fire till soft; sweeten...
-2527. Apples Served With Custard
Pare and core apples; cut them in pieces; bake or stew them with as little water as possible; when completely fallen and sweetened, put them in a pie dish, and, when cold, pour over them an unboiled c...
-2528. Arsenic
Arsenic may be detected by a solution of blue vitriol dropped into the suspected liquid, which will torn green, if arsenic be present ...
-2529. Copper In Liquids
Copper In Liquids may be detected by spirits of hartshorn, which turns them blue. ...
-2530. Clothes Balls
Fullers' earth dried till it crumbles to powder; moisten it with the juice of lemon and a small quantity of pearl-ash, work and knead carefully together till it forms a thick paste; make into balls, a...
-2531. Tincture Of Allspice
Bruised allspice one ounce and a half; brandy a pint. Steep a fortnight, occasionally shaking, then pour off the clear liquor. Excellent for many of the uses of allspice, for making a bishop, mulling ...
-2532. French Batter
Two ounces of butter cut into bits, pour on it less than a quarter of a pint of water boiling; when dissolved add three quarters of a pint of water cold, so that it shall not be quite milk warm; mix b...
-2533. Washing Bed Furniture, Etc
Before putting into the water, see that you shake off as much dust as possible, or you will greatly increase your labour. Use no soda, or pearl-ash, or the things will lose their colour. Use soft wate...
-2534. Mending
When you make a now article always save the piecen Until mending day, which may come sooner than expected. It will be well even to buy a little extra quantity for repairs. Read over repeatedly the ...
-2535. Bedrooms
Bedrooms should not be scoured in the winter time, as colds and sickness may be produced thereby. Dry-scouring, upon the French plan, which consists of scrubbing the floors with dry brushes, may be re...
-2536. Alum Whey
A pint of cow's milk boiled with two drachms of alum, until a curd is found. Then strain oft' the liquor, and add spirit of nutmeg, two ounces; syrup of cloves an ounce. It is used in diabetes, and in...
-2537. Anglo-Japanese Work
This an elegant and easy domestic art. Take yellow withered leaves, dissolve gum, black paint, copal varnish, etc. Any articles may be ornamented with these simple materials. An old work-box, tea-cadd...
-2538. Appetite
Appetite is fre quently lost through excessive use of stimulants, food taken too hot, sedentary occupation, costiveness, liver disorder, and want of change of air. The first endeavour should be to asc...
-2539. Brandy Peaches
Drop them into a weak, boiling lye, until the skim can be wiped off. Make a thin syrup to cover them, boil until they are soft to the finger nail; make a rich syrup, and add, after they come from the ...
-2540. Bastings
1, fresh butter; 2, clarified 6uet; 3, minced sweet herbs, butter, and claret, especially for mutton and lamb; 4, water and salt; 5, cream and melted butter, especially for a flayed pig; 6, yolks of e...
-2541. Dredgings
1, flour mixed with grated bread; 2, sweet herbs dried and powdered, and mixed with grated bread; 3, lemon-peel dried and pounded, or orange-peel, mixed with flour; 4, sugar finely powdered, and mixed...
-2542. Garnishes
Parley is the most universal garnish to all kinds of cold meat, poultry, fish, butter, cheese, and so forth. Horse-radish is the garnish for roast beef, and for fish in general; for the latter, slices...
-2543. Bath Buns
A quarter of a pound of flour, four yolks and three whites of eggs, with four spoonfuls of solid fresh yeast. Beat in a bowl, and set before the fire to rise; then rub into one pound of flour ten ounc...
-2544. French Beans
Cut off the stalk-end, and strip off the strings, then cut thorn into shreds. If not quite fresh, have a basin of spring-water, with a little salt dissolved in it, and as the beans are cleaned and str...
-2545. Wow Wow Sauce
Chop parsley-leaves fine; take two or three pickled cucumbers, or walnuts and divide into small squares, and set them by ready; put into a saucepan butter as big as an egg; when it is melted, stir int...
-2546. Roast Beef Bones
Roast Beef Bones furnish a very relishing luncheon or supper, prepared with poached or fried eggs and mashed potatoes, as accompaniments. Divide the bones, leaving good pickings of meat on each; - sco...
-2547. Grill Sauce
To a quarter of a pint of gravy add half an ounce of butter and a dessertspoonful of flour, well rubbed together, the same of mushroom or walnut catchup, - a teaspoonful of lemon-juice, half a tea-spo...
-2548. Beef Broth
Beef Broth may be made by adding vegetables to (2479) Essence of beef - or you may wash a leg or shin of beef, crack the bone well, (desire the butcher to do it for you,) add any trimmings of meat, ga...
-2549. Beef Glaze, Or Portable Soup
Beef Glaze, Or Portable Soup is simply the essence of beef (2479) condensed by evaporation. It may be put into pots, like potted meats, or into skins, as sausages, and will keep for many months. If fu...
-2550. Stewed Brisket Beef
Stew in sufficient water to cover the meat; when tender, take out the bones, and skim off the fat; add to the gravy, when strained, a glass of wine and a little spice tied up in a muslin bag. (This ma...
-2551. Beef Brisket
Beef Brisket may be baked, the bones being removed, and the holes being filled with oysters, fat bacon, parsley, or all three in separate holes, these stuffings being chopped and seasoned to taste. Dr...
-2552. Baking
In addition to the remarks (239 and 1972), we transcribe the following remarks from Dr. Kitchener's excellent Cook's Oracle: Baking is one of the cheapest and most convenient ways of dressing a di...
-2553. Beef, Cold, Boiled
The same as roast beef bones (2546). The meat should have been under-done in the first instance. Capital relish with the accessories. ...
-2554. Beef (Rump) Steak And Onion Sauce
Peel and slice two large onions, put them into a quart stew-pan, with two table-spoonfuls of water; cover the pan close, and set on a slow fire till the water has boiled away, and the onions have got ...
-2555. Round Of Salt Beef
Skewer it tight and round, and tie a fillet of broad tape round it. Put it into plenty of cold water, and carefully skim the skum; let it boil till all the scum is removed, and then put the boiler on ...
-2557. Hashed Mutton Or Beef
Take the meat, slice small, trim off the brown edges, and stew down the trimmings with the bones well broken, an onion, a bunch of thyme and parsley, a carrot cut into slices, a few peppercorns, clove...
-2558. Ornamented Leather Work
An excellent imitation of carved oak, suitable for frames, boxes, vases, and ornaments in endless variety, may be made of a description of leather called basil. The art consists in simply cutting out ...
-2559. Brewing
The best time of the year for brewing is the autumn. The spring is also suitable but less so. It is a great object to secure a moderate temperature for the cooling of the worts, and to insure gradual...
-2560. Ale
Take three bushels of malt, three pounds of hops, fifty-two gallons of water for two workings. Or - Malt, two bushels and a half; sugar, three pounds; hops, three pounds; coriander seeds, one ounce; ...
-2565. Brasses, Britannia Metals, Tins, Coppers
Brasses, Britannia Metals, Tins, Coppers, etc, arc cleaned with a mixture of rotten-stone, soft-soap, and oil of turpentine, mixed to the consistency of stiff putty. The stone should be powdered very ...
-2566. Breath Tainted By Onions
Leaves of parsley, eaten with vinegar, will prevent the disagreeable consequences of eating onions. ...
-2567. Bunions
Bunions may be checked in their early development by binding the joint with adhesive plaster, and keep ing it on as long as any uneasiness is felt. The bandaging should be perfect, and it might be wel...
-2569. Bad Butter
Bad Butter may be improved greatly by dissolving it thoroughly in hot water; let it cool, then skim it off, and churn again, adding a little good salt and sugar. A small quantity can be tried and appr...
-2570. Gilt Frames
Gilt Frames may be pro-tected from flies and dust by oiled tarlatan pinned over them. Tarlatan already prepared, may be purchased at the upholsterers'. If it cannot be procured, it is easily made by b...
-2571. Salt Butter
Salt Butter may be freshened by churning it with new milk in the proporion of a pound of butter to a quart of milk. Treat the butter in all respects in churning as fresh. Cheap earthenware churns for ...
-2573. Calves' Feet Jelly
It is better to buy the feet of the butcher, than at the tripe shop ready boiled, because the best portion of the jelly has been extracted. Slit them in two, and take every particle of fat from the cl...
-2575. Lamp Wicks
Old cotton stockings may be made into lamp wicks, and will answer very well ...
-2577. Cleaning Carpets
Take a pail of cold water, and add to it three gills of ox-gall. Rub it into the carpet with a soft brush. It will raise a lather; which must be washed off with clear cold water. Rub dry with a clean ...
-2578. Sweetening Casks
Half a pint of vitriol mixed with a quart of water, and the mixture poured into the barrel, and roll about; next day add one pound of chalk, and roll again. Bung down for three or four days, then rins...
-2579. Cautions In Visiting The Sick
Do not visit the sick when you are fatigued, or when in a state of perspiration, or with the stomach empty - for in such conditions you are liable to take the infection. When the disease is very conta...
-2580. Chamomile Flowers
Chamomile Flowers should be gathered on a fine day, and dried upon a tray placed in the sun, all herbs should be treated in the same manner. 2581. Chamomile Tea One ounce of the flowers to a quart o...
-2582. Orange-Peel
Orange-Peel, dried, added to chamomile flowers in the proportion of half the quantity of the flowers, improves the tonic. ...
-2583. Dessert Chestnuts
Roast them well, take off the husks, dissolve four ounces of lump sugar in a wine-glass of water, then add the juice of a lemon. Put the chesnuts into this liquor, and stew them over a slow fire for t...
-2584. Carving
Ceremonies of the Table, etc. - A dinner-table should be well laid, well lighted, and always afford a little spare room. It is better to invite one friend less in number, than to destroy the comfort o...
-2604. Poultry And Game
2605. Observations On Trussing Although in New York the various articles are trussed by the poulterer from whom they are purchased, yet it happens that presents from the country are sometimes ...
-2624. Quarter Of Lamb
Lay the knife flat, and cut off the shoulder. The proper point for incision will be indicated by the position of the shoulder. A little lemon-juice may be squeezed over the divided part, and a little ...
-2609. Directions For Carving Fish
2610. As the manner in which meat, and other provisions, are carved, makes a material difference in the consumption and comfort of a family, it becomes highly important to those who study economy and ...
-Beef
2615. Saddles of Pork or Lamb are carved in the same manner. 2616. Haunch Of Mutton Or Venison Make an incision right across the knuckle-end, right into the bone, and set free the gravy. Then cut ...
-Mutton
2614. Saddle Of Mutton Cut thin slices parallel with the back-bone; or slice it obliquely from the bone to the edge. 2621. Shoulder Of Mutton Make a cross incision on the fore-part of the shoulder,...
-Poultry
2636. Pheasants Carve the breast in slices. Then take off the legs and wings as a fowl, 2637. Fowls Fix the fork fire ly into the breast, then slip the knife under the legs, and lay it over and ...
-2647. Pulled Bread
Take from the oven an ordinary loaf when it is about half baked, and with the fingers, while the bread is yet hot, dexterously pull the half-6et dough into pieces of irregular shape, about the size of...
-2648. Yeast
The following has been used and approved through 36 years. For a stone of flour: into two quarts of water put a quarter of an ounce of hops, two potatoes sliced, a tablespoonful of malt, or sugar; boi...
-2650. Dogs
The best way to keep a dog healthy is to let him have plenty of exercise, and not to over-feed him. Let them at all times have a plentiful supply of clean water, and encourage them to take to swimming...
-2651. Cats
It is generally supposed that cats are more attached to places than to individuals, but this is an error. They obstinately cling to certain places, because it is there they expect to see the persons t...
-2652. Medicines
Preparation of them - These directions are of the utmost value in connexion with the Domestic Pharmacopoeia (906) Diseases (1212), Prescriptions (1273) and Poisons (2261). They will be found must impo...
-2664. Process Of Making Medicines
To Powder Substances - Place the substance in the mortar and strike it gently with direct perpendicular blows of the pestle, until it separates into several pieces, then remove all but a small portion...
-2674. Precautions To Be Observed In Giving Medicines
Sex - Medicines for females should not be so strong as those for males, therefore it is advisable to reduce the doses about one-eighth. 2675. Temperament Persons of a phlegmatic temperament bear sti...
-2682. Best Method Of Preventing The Natiseous Taste Of Medicines
Castor oil may be taken in milk, coffee, or spirit, such as brandy; but the best method of covering the nauseous flavour is to put a table-spoonful of strained orange-juice in a wine-glass, pour the c...
-2685. Doses Of Medicine For Different Ages
It must be plain to every one that children do not require such powerful medicine as adults or old people, and therefore it is desirable to have some fixed method of determining or regulating the admi...
-2086. Drugs, With Their Properties And Doses
We have arranged the various drugs according to their properties, and have given the doses of each; but in compiling this we have necessarily omitted many from each class, because they cannot be emplo...
-2688. General Stimulants
Gene-ral Stimulants are sub-divided into two classes, diffusable and permanent stimulants: the first comprising narcotics and anti-spasmodics, and the second tonics and astringents. 2689. Narcotics a...
-2688. General Stimulants. Part 2
Dose, from four grains to one scruple, repeated at short intervals when used in small doses, and long intervals when employed in large doses. Doses of the vatious preparations: -Camphor mixture, from...
-2688. General Stimulants. Part 3
A weak solution of opium forms a valuable collyrium in ophthalmia. Two drops of the wine of opium dropped into the eye, acts as an excellent stimulant in bloodshot eye; or after long-continued inflam...
-2688. General Stimulants. Part 4
2700. Assafcetida is an anti-spasmodic, expectorant, excitant, and anthelmintic. Used internally, it is extremely useful in dyspepsia, flatulent colic, hysteria, and nervous diseases; and where ...
-2688. General Stimulants. Part 5
2707. Oxide of Zinc is an anti-spasmodic, astringent, and tonic. Used externally, as an ointment, it forms a useful astringent in affections of the eyelids, arising from relaxation, or as a powder ...
-2712. Chamomile
The flowers of the chamomile are tonic, slightly anodyne, auti-spasmodic, and emetic. They are used externally as fomenta-tions, in colic, face-ache, and tumours, and to unhealthy ulcers. They are u...
-Wormwood
2713. Wormwood is a tonic and anthelmintic. It is used externally as a discutient and antiseptic. It is used internally in long-standing cases of dyspepsia, in the form of infusion, with or without ...
-Angostura Bark, Or Cusparia
2714. Angostura Bark, or cusparia, is a tonic and stimulant. It expels flatulence, increases the appetite, and produces a grateful warmth in the stomach. It is used internally in intermittent fevers,...
-Astringents
2715. Astringents are medicines given for the purpose of diminishing excessive discharges, and to act indirectly as tonics. This class includes catechu, kino, oak bark, logwood, rose-leaves, chalk, ...
-2723. Local Stimulants
Local stimulants comprise emetics, cathartics, diuretics, diaphoretics, expectorants, sialogogues, errhines, and epispaetics. ...
-Emetics
2724. Emetics are medicines given for the purpose of causing vomiting, as in cases of poisoning. They consist of ipecacuana, chamomile, and mustard. 2725. Ipecacuanha is an emetic, diaphoretic, and ...
-Cathartics
2727. Cathartics are divided into laxatives and purgatives. The former comprise manna, tamarinds, castor oil, sulphur, and magnesia; the latter, senna, rhubarb, jalap, colocynth, buck-thorn, aloes, ...
-Cathartics. Continued
Jalap 2735. Jalap is a powerful cathartic and hydrogogue, and is apt to gripe. Dose of the powder from ten to thirty grains, combined with a drop or two of aromatic oil; of the compound powder from ...
-Diuretics
2745. Diuretics are medicines which promote an increased secretion of urine. They consist of nitre, acetate of potassa, squills, juniper, and oil of turpentine. 2746. Nitre is a diuretic and ...
-Diuretics. Continued
Dose from one-sixth of a grain to four grains. Caution. It is a poison, and there fore requires great care in its administra-tion. 2754. Antimonial powder is a diaphoretic, emetic, and alterative. ...
-2764. Chemical Remedies
The chemical remedies comprise refrigerants, antacids, antalkalies, and escharotics. 2765. Refrigerants are medicines given for the purpose of suppressing an unnatural heat of the body. They are Sevi...
-Antacids
2768. Antacids are given to correct acidity in the system. They are soda, ammonia, chalk, and magnesia. 2769. Soda, carbonate of, and sesqui-carbonate of soda, are antacids and de-obstruents. They ...
-Antalkalies
2770. Antalkalies are given to neutralize an alkaline state of the system. They are citric acid, lemon-juice, and tartaric acid. 2771. Citric acid is used to check profuse sweating, and as a ...
-2777. Mechanical Remedies
The mechanical remedies comprise anthelmintics, demulcents, diluents, and emollients. 2778. Anthelmintics are medicines given for the purpose of expelling or destroying worms. They are cowhage, scamm...
-Emollients
2790. Emollients consist of unctuous remedies, such as cerates and ointments, and any materials that combine heat with moisture. (See, Poultices, 2199.) ...
-2791. Blanched Almonds
Put them into cold water, and heat them slowly to scalding; then take them out and peel them quickly, throwing them into cold water as they are done. Dry) them in a cloth before serving. 2792. Poundi...
-2793. Anchovy Butter
Scrape the skin from a dozen fine anchovies, take the flesh from the bones, pound it smooth in a mortar; rub through a hair-sieve, put the anchovies into the mortar with three-quarters of a pound of f...
-2797. Apricots Stewed In Syrup
Wipe the down from young apricots, and stew them as gently us possible in a syrup made of four ounces of sugar to half a pint of water, boiled the usual time. 2798. Dry Apricots Take before ripe, sc...
-2800. Swimming
Every person, male and female, should endeavor to acquire the power of swimming. The fact that the exercise is a healthful accompaniment of bathing, and that lives may be saved by it, even when least ...
-2800. Swimming. Continued
2805. In fresh water, if a man throw himself on his back, near the surface, he cannot long continue in that situation but by proper action of his hands on the water; if he use no 6uch action, the ...
-2816. Taking A House
Before taking a house, be careful to calculate that the rent is not too high in proportion to your means; for remember that the rent is a claim which must be paid with but little delay, and that the l...
-2821. Taking A Shop Or Place Of Business
If you are about to take a place of business, you will do well to consider the following remarks: 2822. Small Capitalists Let us take the case of a person who has no intimate knowledge of any partic...
-2821. Taking A Shop Or Place Of Business. Part 2
2827. Precautions But should the small capitalist still prefer opening in a suburban district, where competition is less severe, and rents and rates less burdensome, there are certain precautions ...
-2821. Taking A Shop Or Place Of Business. Part 3
2831. Connection In small towns connection has a great deal to do with the success of the shopkeeper There are, accordingly, special cases which we are not prepared to discuss. For instance, if a ...
-2844. Hints On Scrubbing Floors
After the white-washing, paint-cleaning, and window-washing of each room has been completed, let the floor be scrubbed; first seeing that it has been well swept. For this purpose have a small tub or b...
-2845. Laws Of Landlord And Tenant
Leases. - A lease is a conveyance of premises or lands for a specified term of years, at a yearly rent, with definite conditions as to alterations, repairs, payment of rent, forfeiture, etc. Being an ...
-2865. The Etiquette Of Courtship And Marriage
No subject in this work is more important, and certainly none will be studied with as much attention, as that of the present section. Love is the universal passion, courtship is the most interesting a...
-2866. How To Win The Favor Of Ladies
To win the favor of ladies, dress and manner must never be neglected. Women look more to sense than to beauty, and a man shows his sense, or his want of it, in every action of his life. When a young m...
-2867. How To Address A Lady
We address a married lady, or widow, as Madam, or by name, as Missis or Mistress Jones. In answering a. question, we contract the Madam to ma'am - as yes, ma'am, no, ma'am, very fine day, ma'am.' 28...
-2889. Popping The Question
There is nothing more appalling to a modest and sensitive young man than asking the girl he loves to marry him; and there are few who do not find tbeir moral courage tasked to the utmost. Many a man w...
-2900. Marriage Ceremony
Weddings are everywhere accompanied with some degree of ceremony, and are usually considered as occasions of festivities 2901. The preliminaries having; been arranged by the contracting parties, and ...
-2900. Marriage Ceremony. Part 2
2912. The Bridal Chamber The festivities should not be kept up too late; and at the hour of retiring, the bride is to be conducted to the bridal chamber by the bridesmaids, who assist her in her ...
-2900. Marriage Ceremony. Part 3
2924. Cards With regard to sending out cards, as wedding tours are more extended than in olden times, they are generally forwarded about a week or two previous to the return of the travellers. Plain ...
-2926. After Marriage
After marriage the bridal party usually travel for a week or two, upon their return, it is customary for the bride to be at home for a few days, to receive visits. The first four weeks after marriag...
-2928. Acquaintances After Marriage
When a man marries, it is understood that all former acquaintanceship ends, unless he intimate a desire to renew it, by sending you his own and his wife's card, if near, or by letter, if distant. If t...
-2930. Wedding Cakes
Four pounds of fine flour, well dried, four pounds of fresh butter, two pounds of loaf sugar a quarter of a pound of mace pounded and sifted fine, the same of nutmegs To every pound of flour add eight...
-2931. Almond Icing For Wedding Cake
Beat the whites of three eggs to a strong froth, beat a pound of Jordan almonds very fine with rose water, mix them, with the eggs, lightly together; put in by degrees a pound of common loaf sugar in ...
-2935. True Time
Two kinds of time are used in Almanacs; clock or mean time in some, and apparent or sun time in others. Clock time is always right, while sun time varies every day. People generally suppose it is twel...
-2934. To Ascertain The Length Of The Day And Night
At anytime of the year, add 12 hours to the time of the sun's setting, and from the sum subtract the time of rising, for the length of the day. Subtract the time of setting from 12 hours, and to the r...
-2937. To Pack Glass Or China
Procure some soft straw or hay to pack thern in, and if they are to be sent a long way, and are heavy, the hay or straw should be a little damp, which will prevent them slipping about. Let the largest...
-2938. Hints On Things Familiar
What is carbonic acid gas? - A gas formed by the union of carbon and oxygen. It used to be called fixed air. 2939. Under what circumstances does carbon most readily unite with oxygen ? - 1. When its...
-2965. Synopsis Of English Grammar
Synopsis Of English Grammar (See 1323) is so brief, that its substance may, if desirable, be committed to memory in an hour or two. The uninitiated may acquire knowledge by its perusal; it may serve t...
-2992. Properties And Uses Of Vegetables
(See 1273.) 2993. Catnip is a warm herb, of a diaphoretic or sweating nature. 2994. Pennyroyal is much the same, only more powerful. It retains a very powerful pungent oil. 2995. Spearmint is punge...
-2992. Properties And Uses Of Vegetables. Continued
3021. In addition, then, to the ordinary routine of education, make yourself acquainted with the passing circumstances of the day - its politics, its parties, its amusements, its foibles, its customs,...
-3052. Domestic Manipulation
3053. Under the head of Domestic Manipulation, we propose giving a series of articles on the numerous and essential manual operations that are constantly being required in every family, and which, ...
-3056. Cleaning
Perhaps no more effectual and easy mode of cleaning wine and beer bottles can be recommended than that commonly adopted, viz., the use of small shot and water, in the case of old port wine bottles, ho...
-3058. Drying
It is scarcely necessary to speak of the advantages of being able to dry thoroughly both decanters and common bottles; if the former, after having been cleansed, are put away wet, they become musty; a...
-3059. Corking
Little can be said with regard to the corking of bottles, beyond stating the fact that cheap bad corks are always dear; the best corks are soft, velvety, and free from large pores; if squeezed they be...
-3060. Tying Down
The operation of tying down corks merits a long notice, as without it many effervescent wines and liquids could not be preserved. The most common mode of fast-ening down works with the gingerbeer knot...
-3062. Stoppering
The stoppering of bottles is an operation usually performed by the makers; it may, however, be useful to know that badly-fitting stoppers may be readily fitted by re-grinding; this is done by dipping ...
-3063. Unstoppering
This operation is much more likely to be required than the one last described, for the stoppers of decanters, smelling bottles, etc, from various causes, frequently become fixed, and many are the frac...
-3066. Cutting, Grinding, And Writing On Glass
We have described the most advantageous modes of extracting fixed stoppers from decanters, etc. It is possible that some of our readers may have followed our advice sufficiently well to have succeeded...
-3080 Cry Of The Most Important
Domestic Manipulations, although one of the most simple and easy, is the labelling of glass vessels. It is not too much to affirm, that scores of lives might have been saved if this had been attended ...
-3085. Decanting, Straining, And Filtering Of Liquids
(See 2668.) The decanting of liquids is, under ordinary circumstances, an operation sufficiently simple to require no explanation; but the ease and certainty with which it can be performed, depend ent...
-3085. Decanting, Straining, And Filtering Of Liquids. Part 2
CO whole will then have have the appear ance represented in Fig. 3, and will form an exceedingly useful, and very convenient syphon. 3094. In emptying large stone bobles or carboys, the following pl...
-3085. Decanting, Straining, And Filtering Of Liquids. Part 3
Fig. 6. Fig. 7. those previously made, when it will be found that the whole will readily fold up like a paper fan; the projecting loose ends which are formed by the corners b, should be cut off,...
-3085. Decanting, Straining, And Filtering Of Liquids. Part 4
Fig. 9. 3106. After drying, substances should not be exposed to the air, but, unless they are of sueh a nature as to be softened by heat, are better operated on whilst still warm. Flints are more r...
-3112. Knots, Packages, Parcels, Etc
The poet Crabbe, speaking of the writing of the rustics, signing his parish registers, says 'Tis strange that men Who guide the plough should fail to guide the pen ! For half a mile the furrows ev...
-3112. Knots, Packages, Parcels, Etc. Continued
Fig. 16. Fig. 18. Fig. 17. 3117. For fastening a cord to any cylindrical object, one of the most useful knots is the clove hitch, which, although exceedingly simple and most easily made, is o...
-3122. Laying Out First-Class Tables
Breakfast, Luncheons, and Folding Napkins. 3123. The art of laying out a table consists in arrranging the various dishes, plate, glass, etc., methodically, and ad hering to the rules we are about to ...
-3126. Breakfast
The table should be covered with a clean white cloth; the cups and saucers arranged at one end, if for tea; and at both ends, if for tea and coffee; or the coffee-cups and saucers may be arranged at t...
-3137. Napkins
Dinner napkins should be about twenty-eight inches broad, and thirty inches long. They may be folded in a variety of ways, which imparts a style to a table, without adding much to the expense, and may...
-3145. Dinners
The appearance a dinner-table presents does not depend so much upon a profuseness of viands, as upon the neatness, cleanliness, and well studied arrangement of the whole. Taste, if well directed, may ...
-3147. To Lay The Cloth
The table should be well polished, and then covered with a green baize cloth, over which a fine white damask one should be spread. If the white cloth is to be kept on after dinner, it is customary to ...
-3150. To Lay Out The Sideboard Or Tray
Little requires to be done, except to arrange the silver, knives, cruets, and various dishes to be placed there. The silver should be arranged on one end of the sideboard, as in Figs. 1 and 2, the gra...
-3152. To Place The Dishes On The Table
Each servant should be provided, at large dinners, with a bill of fare, and instructed at small ones, where the dishes are to be placed. No two dishes resembling each other should be near the same par...
-3164. Waiting At Table
Much confusion is avoided by having an attendant upon each side of the table; or, if the party is large, more than one, according to the number. The usual number required for parties is given below: a...
-3173. The Dessert
The dessert may consist of merely two dishes of fruit for the top and bottom; dried fruits, biscuits, filberts, etc, for the sides and corners; and a cake for the centre. 3174. When the party is larg...
-3178. Behavior At Dinner
There is no situation in which one's breeding is more observed, than at the dinner-table; our work would therefore be incomplete without the proper directions as to its etiquette. 3179. If there are ...
-3192. Four Good Points
These were earnestly recommended by a wise and good man, and enforced by his own example. They are essentially necessary for the management of temporal concerns. These are: 1. Punctuality. 2. Accura...
-3193. Four Important Rules
1. A suitable place for everything, and everything in its place. 2. A proper time for everything, and everything done in its time. 3. A distinct name for everything, and everything called by its nam...
-3194. Table Of Weights And Measures
3195. Men are often measured by weight of intellect or character, which is very diversified, but not more than the weights and measures of men in different regions, by which they measure merchandise ...
-3194. Table Of Weights And Measures. Part 2
3208. Government Land Measure A township, 36 sections, each a mile square. A section, 640 acres. A quarter section, half a mile square, 160 acres. An eighth section, half a mile long, north and ...
-3194. Table Of Weights And Measures. Part 3
3213. Board Measure Boards are sold by superficial measure, at so much per foot of one inch or less in thickness, adding one fourth to the price for each quarter-inch thickness over an inch. 3214. ...
-3234. Riddles
It may be asked, What is a riddle ? - Ah ! what is it That's just the rub! Well, then, it is a queer affair, without shape, size, humanity, compassion, breath, or sex. It is caressed, abused, courted,...
-3237. M. Voltaire's Riddle
What is the longest, and yet the shortest thing in the world; the swiftest and the most slow; the most divisible and the most extended; the least valued, and the most regretted; without which nothing ...
-3239. A Problem For Arithmeticians
A. and B., two countrymen, came to the New York market with 30 geese each. A. sells his 30 geese at the rate of two for $1, and B. sells his 30 geese at the rate of three for $1, at which rate the pur...
-3240. Arithmetical Puzzle
It is done thus: --- 3241. Practical Puzzle It is required to name the quotient of five or three lines of figures - each line consisting of five or more figures - only seeing the first line, before ...
-3242. To Tell Any Number Thought Of
Ask a person to think of a number; then tell him to subtract 1 from that number; now tell him to multiply the remainder by 2; then request him again to subtract 1, and add to the remainder the number ...
-3243. The Expunged Figure
In the first place desire a person to write down secretly, in a line, any number of figures he may choose, and add them together as units; having done this, tell him to subtract that sum from the line...
-3244. The Remainder
A very pleasing way to arrive at an arithmetical sum, without the use of either 6late or pencil, is to ask a person to think of a figure, then to double it, then add a certain figure to it, now halve ...
-3245. The Three Jealous Husbands
This is a very ingenious puzzle and should be performed with small counters of two different colors Three jealous husbands, with their wives, having to cross a small stream, find a boat without an own...
-3246. Technical Terms Relative To Books, Engravings, Etc
3247. Books are distinguished according to the number of pages in a sheet of the paper on which they are printed; as, two leaves,4 pages, folio; four leaves, 8 pages, quarto, or 4 to; eight leaves, ...
-3255. Receipts
A receipt is not conclusive evidence of payment, but it throws the burden of proof upon him who attempts to impeach if. 3256. Receipts may be either in full of all demands, for a special account, in ...
-3262. Fifty Thousand Cures
Fifty Thousand Cures of drowsiness dejection, dolour, dulness, depression, ennui, ill-humor, indigestion, (mental,) from political or other dry reading, loss of temper, low spirits, melancholy, morose...
-3263. Curious Facts
If a tallow candle be placed in a gun and be shot at a door, it will go through without sustaining any injury; and if a musket-ball be fired into water, it will rebound and be flattened as if fired ag...
-3288. How To Dress With Taste
3289. The importance of dress can scarcely be overrated, but by comparison. It is with the world the outward sign of both character and condition; and since it costs no more to dress well than ill, ...
-3303. Ladies Guide To Crotchet
By Mrs. Ann. S. Stephens - Copiously illustrated with original and very choice designs in Crotchet, etc., printed in colours, separate from the letter-press, on tinted paper. Also, with numerous wood-...
-3313. Poultices
(See 2199.) 3314. Bread Poultice - Take stale bread in crumbs, pour boiling water over it, and boil till soft, stirring it well; then take it from the fire, and gradually stir in a little hog's lard ...
-3325. Salve For Sore Breasts
Take one pound tobacco, one pound spikenard, half a pound of cumfrey, and boil them in three quarts of chamber-ley till almost dry; squeeze out the juice, add to it pitch and bees-wax, and simmer it o...
-3326. How To Get Rich
What will my readers give to know how to get rich ? Now, I will not vouch that the following rules will enable every person who may read them to acquire wealth, but this I will answer for, that if eve...
-3353. The American Home Cook Book
The best guide to American Cookery ever put in print -containing several hundred recipes -the whole based on many years' ex perience of an American housewife. Illustrated with engravings. Price 25 cen...
-3354. Indian Bannock
One pint of corn meal, one quart of milk; boil the milk, and scald the meal thor oughly. Beat up three eggs. Thin your dough to a batter with cold milk; add a piece of butter half as large as an egg; ...
-3355. To Restore Sour Milk
Milk or cream may be sweetened after it has become slightly sour, by a small portion of carbonate of magnesia. Salsaeratus, also, will correct the acid, but it slightly injures the flavor, unless very...
-3356. Cough Syrup
Put 1 qt, hoarhound to 1 qt. water, and boil it down to a pint: add 2 or 3 sticks of liquorice and a table-spoonful of es-sence lemon. Take a tablespoonful of the syrup three times a day, or is often ...
-3358. Cure For A Bruise
The tincture of Arnica is one of the most effectual remedies for a bruise. Bathe with a sponge. It should not, however, be used if the skin is broken. (Sec 2295.) ...
-3360. Typographical Marks Exemplified
We give below, for the behoof of authors and correctors for the Press, a specimen of the manner in which the errors in a proofsheet should be marked on the margin. An atten tive study of the symbols a...
-3359. Local Or Relative Time
Local time is that which is shown by our common clocks. It indicates the time at any given place, the meridian of that place being the standard from which it is reckoned; therefore, the time or the cl...
-3367. For Fine And Dry Weather Of Long Continuance
If the wind bo north, north-west, or east, then veer to the north-east, remain there two or three days without rain, and then veer to the south without rain; and if thence it change quickly, though pe...
-3412. For Foul And Wet Weather
3413. If the sun rise pale, or pale-red, or even dark blue, there will be rain during the day. 3414. If the clouds at sunrise be red, ihere will be rain the following day. 3415. If at sunrise many ...
-3489. For Storm
3490. If the clouds be of different heights, the sky above being grayish or dirty blue, with hardly any wind stirring; the wind, however, changing from W. to S., or sometimes to S. E., without ...
-Law Maxims
*3552. LAW MAXIMS. 3553. A promise of a debtor to give satisfactory security for the payment of a portion of his debt, is a sufficient; consideration for a release of the residue by his creditor. 3...
-Law Maxims. Part 2
3585. The amount of an express debt cannot be enlarged by application. 3586. Contracts for advertisements in Sunday newspapers cannot be enforced. 3887. A seller of goods, chattels, or other ...
-Law Maxims. Part 3
3611. Any contract made with a per son judicially deelared a lunatic is void 3612. Money paid voluntarily in any transaction, with a knowledge of the facts, cannot be recovered. 3613. In all cases ...
-Law Maxims. Part 4
3644. A corporation may maintain an action for libel, for words published of them, and relating to its trade or businebs, by which it has incurred special damages 3645. It is unprofessional for a ...
-Washing Fluids
(See 2179 and 654.) 3668. Washing Fluids, in many places, have almost universally now come into use, resulting in a great saving of labor and time, and proving far less destructive to wearing apparel...
-3674. Starching, Folding, Ironing, Etc
3675. To Prepare Starch - Tube two tablespoonfuls of starch dissolved in as much water; add a gill of cold water; then add one pint of boiling water, and boil it half an hour, adding a small piece of ...
-3687. Planting Box For Edgings
The operation of plantingBox has ever been considered one in which much practice is needed; that it is a labour of time and inconvenience, even to the experienced labourer, as usually performed, we wi...
-3692. Directions For Pruning Vines
In pruning always cut upwards, and in a sloping direction. 3693. Always leave an inch of blank wood beyond a terminal bud, and let the cut be on the opposite side of the bud. 3694. Prune so as to le...
-3700. Age Of A Horse
Every horse has six teeth above and below; before three years old he sheds his middle teeth; at three he sheds one more on each side of the central teeth; at four he sheds the two corner and last of t...
-3705. How To Judge A Horse
A correspondent, contrary to old maxims, undertakes to judge the character of a horse by outward appearances, and offers the following suggestions, the result of his close obser vation and long experi...
-3717. The Best Season For Painting Houses
The outside of buildings should be painted during autumn or winter. Hot weather injures the paint by drying in the oil too quickly; then the paint will easily rub off. But when the paint is laid on du...
-3718. Seeds
Never retain the same kinds of seeds too long upon the land; at the end of three years it will generally deteriorate, and ought to be changed; change of seed always produces a change for the better in...
-3719. Johnny Cakes
Sift a quart of corn meal into a pan; make a hole in the middle, and pour in a pint of warm water. Mix the meal and water gradually in a batter, adding a teaspoonful of salt; beat it very quickly, and...
-3720. Management Of A Watch
Wind your watch as nearly as possible at the same hour every day. 3721. Be careful that your key is in good condition, as there is much danger of injuring the machine when the key is worn or cracked;...
-3730. Offensive Cesspools
Sulphate of zinc can be purchased of any druggist, in the form of a salt, and a pound of it dissolved in two pails of warm water and thrown into an offen-sive cesspool, will soon deodorize it. ...
-3731. Almond Custards
Take four ounces of blanched almonds: 4 yolks of eggs; 1 pint of cream; 2 table-spoonsful of sugar; 2 teaspoonsful of rose water. Beat the almonds fine with the rose water; beat the yolks and sugar to...
-3734. Infallible Remedy For Dysentery
Take one table spoonful of common salt, and mix it with two tablespoonsful of vinegar and pour upon it a half-pint of water, either hot or cold (only let it be taken cool.) A wine-glass full of this m...
-3736. Table Of The Solar System
NAME. Menn dia. in English miles. Mean distance from the Sun. Time of rotation round their axes. Time of revolution round the Bun. The Sun, 883,246 35...
-3737. Table Of Bulk And Weight Of Some Substances
Article. Pounds in cubic foot. Cubic feet in a ton. Article. Pounds in cubic foot. Cubic feet in a ton. Cast Iron ................ 450 4.97 Plast...
-3738. To Find The Measurement Of A Box
A box 24 by 16 inches square, and 22 deep, contains 1 barrel 24 16 11 1/2 16 16.8 8 1 bushel...
-3730. Capacity Of Cisterns Ok Wells
Tabular view of the number of gallous contained in the clear between the brick work for each ten iuches of depth: Diameter. Gallons. 2 feet equals 19 2 1/2 30...
-3740. To Measure Corn In The Crib
Corn is generally put up in cribs made of rails, but the rule will apply to a crib of any size or kind. Two cubic feet of good, sound, dry corn in the ear, will make a bushel of shelled corn. To get,...
-3711. Artificers' Work-How To Measure
(Several differ ent Measures are in use by Artificers.) 3742. Carpentry and Plastering are measured by the square foot or yard; or in moulded or ornamental work, by the lineal font. In extensive work...
-3750. Weights Of A Cubic Foot Of Various Sub-Stances
Loose earth or sand...... 95 pounds Common soil................... 124 Strong soil.............. 127 Clay.................. 135 ...
-3751. Hay
10 cubic yards of meadow hay weigh a ton. When the hay is taken out of large or old stacks 8 and 9 yards will make a ton. 11 to 12 cubic yards of clover, when dry, weigh a ton. ...
-3752. Digging
24 cubic feet of sand, 18 cubic feet of earth, 17 cubic feet of clay, or 13 cubic feet of chalk, make 1 ton. 1 cubic yard of solid gravel or earth contains 18 heaped bushels before digging, and 1 1/2...
-3756. Velocity Of Sound And Light
Sound moves about thirteen miles in a minute. So that if we hear a clap of thunder half a minute after the flash, we may calculate that the discharge of electricity is a half miles off. In one second...
-3757. Twigg's Hair Dye
An excellent dye, as well as most serviceable hair-wash. Take 1 drachm lac sulphur, 1/2 drachm sugar lead, 4 ounces rose water. Mix carefully. Wash the hair repeatedly, till it assumes the desired sh...
-3759. Cocoanut Pudding
Break the shell of a middle-sized co coanut so as to leave the nut as whole as you can; grate it with a grater after having taken off the brown skin; mix with it 3 oz. of white sugar powdered, and abo...
-3760. Custard Pudding
Suf-ficiently good for common use, may be made by taking 5 eggs beaten up and mixed with a quart of milk, sweetened with sugar and spiced with cinnamon allspioe, or nutmeg. It is well to boil your mil...
-3761. Peach Pie
ake mellow juicy peaches - wash, slice, and put them in a deep pie plate, lined with pie crust. Sprinkle a thick layer of sugar on each layer of peaches, put in about a table-spoonful of water, and sp...
-3762. Rich Mince Meat
Cut the root off a neat's tongue, rub the tongue well with salt, let it lie 4 days, wash it perfectly clean, and boil it till it becomes tender; skin, and when cold chop it very finely. Mince as small...
-3763. Rhubarb Pies
Take the tender stalks of the rhubarb, strip oft the skin, and cut the stalks into thin slices. Line deep plates with pie crust, then put in the rhubarb, with a thick layer of sugar to each layer of ...
-3764. Lemon Pudding
Melt six ounces of butter, and pour it over the same quantity of powdered loaf sugar, stirring it well till cold. Then grate the rind of a large lemon, and add it with 8 eggs well beaten, and the juic...
-3765. Cocoanut Cheese Cakes
Brake carefully the shell of the nut, that the liquid it contains may not escape. Take out the kernel, wash it in cold water, pare thinly off the dark skin, and grate the nut on a delicately clean bre...
-3766. Plain Mince Pies
Take 2 lbs. of lean beef boiled, and 1 lb. of suet, chopped fine; 3 lbs. of apples, 2 lbs., of raisins or currants, 1 lb. of sugar, a little salt, pepper, cinnamon, cloves, and 1 nutmeg; moisten with ...
-3767. Apple Pudding
Pare and core 12 large apples, put them into a sauce-pan with water sufficient to cover them, stew them till soft, and then beat them smooth, and mix in three quarters of a pound of pounded loaf sugar...
-3768. To Pickle Tomatoes
Wash the tomatoes; puncture them slightly with a pointed stick about the size of a straw. Then fill a jar with alternate layers of tomatoes and salt; let them stand for eight or ten days. Then to each...
-3769. Cream Pudding
Beat up the yolks of 4 eggs and 2 whites: add a pint of cream, and 2 oz. of clarified butter, a spoonful of flour, a little grated nutmeg, salt, and sugar; beat till smooth: bake it in buttered cups o...
-3770. Tapioca Pudding
Soak in warm water 1 tea-cupful of tapioca; beat 4 eggs with 3 table-spoons-fill of sugar; melt in half a pint of milk 1 table-spoonful of butter. Stir all together; flavor to your taste, and bake in ...
-3771. For Diarrhoea When Accompanied With Pain
Take 2 drachms conc, sulphuric ether, 2 drachms spirit lavender, comp. 1/2 drachm wine opium, 3 drops cil cloves. One teaspoonful for an adult, on a lump of sugar, is the dose. To bo eaten quickly, a...
-3773. An Excellent Horse Liniment
Take 1 pint alcohol, 1/4 ounce castile soap, 1/4 ounce gum camphor 1/4 ounce of sal ammoniac. When these are dissolved, add 1 ounce of laudanum, 1 ounce origanum, 1/2 ounce oil sassafras, and 2 ounces...
-3774. Curious Properties Of Some Figures
To multiply by 2 is the same as to multiply by 10 and divide by 5. Any number of figures you may wish to multiply by 5, will give the same result if divided by 2 - a much quicker operation than the f...
-3775. Fraudulent Scales-Rule To Detect
After an equilibrium has been established between the weight and the article weighed, transpose them, and the weight will preponderate if the article weighed is lighter than the weight, and contrariwi...
-3776. Rule To Ascertain The True Weight
Let the weight which will produce equilibrium after transposition be found, and with the former weight be reduced to the same denomination of weight: and let the two weights thus expressed be multipli...
-3777. Tricopherous For The Hair
Take of pure castor oil 6 ounces; alcohol (95 per cent), 10 ounces; oil bergamot 1 drachm; oil lavender, 1 do. Shake well together. This is a very agreeable and most excellent preparation for the hai...
-3778. Avery Good Microscope
Avery Good Microscope may be made by dropping a little Balsam of Fir, or Canada Balsam, on the under side of a thin piece of glass. It may be used both before and after it is dry. (See 2395.) ...
-779. Good Liquid Glue
Good Liquid Glue, for household purposes, may be made by mixing 3 oz. gum arable, 3 oz. distilled vinegar, with 1 oz white sugar Instead of the distilled vinegar, one part ascetic acid and five parts ...
-How To Remove Stains
502. Ink-Spots Ink-Spots may be taken out of mahogany by applying spirits of salt. 507. To Take Ink-Stains Out Of A Coloured Table-Cover Dissolve a teaspoonful of oxalic acid in a tea-cup of hot ...
-Gardening
1308. To Clear Rose Trees From Blight Take sulphur and tobacco dust in equal quantities, and strew it over the trees of a morning when the dew is on them. The insects will disappear in a few days. ...
-Insects
1832. To Kill Cockroaches A teacupful of well-bruised Plaster of Paris, mixed with double the quantity of oatmeal, to which add a little sugar (the latter is not essential). Strew it on the floor or ...
-Pests
1319. To Exterminate Beetles 1. Place a few lumps of unslacked lime where they frequent. 2. Set a dish or trap containing a little beer or syrup at the bottom, and place a few sticks slanting ...
-Misc Recipes
2057. Substitute For Cream In Tea Or Coffee Beat the white of an egg to a froth, put to it a very small lump of butter, and mix well, Then turn into it gradually, bo that it may not curdle. If ...
-Misc Facts
3754. How To Lay Off A Square Acre Measure 209 feet, on each side, and you have a square acre, within an inch. 3755. Ropes And Cables 6 feet make 1 fathom, 120 fathoms 1 cable length. 1839. ...
-Misc Facts. Part 2
3276. To Extract Paint From Goods Saturate the spot with pure spirits of turpentine, and let it remain several hours, then rub it between the hands. It will crumble away, without injuring either the ...
-Misc Facts. Part 3
582. If A Larder By Its Position If A Larder By Its Position, will not admit of opposite windows, then a current of air must be admitted by means of a flue from the outside. 583. The Beneficial ...
-Misc Facts. Part 4
519. Cold Green Tea Cold Green Tea, very strong, and sweetened with sugar, will, when set about in saucers, attract flies and destroy them. 520. Clothes Closets Clothes Closets that have become ...
-Misc Facts. Part 5
535. A Stair-Carpet A Stair-Carpet should. never be swept down with a long broom, but always with a short-handled brush, and a dust-pan held closely un-der each step of the stairs, 536. Oil-Cloth ...
-Misc Facts. Part 6
552. For Cleaning Brasses For Cleaning Brasses belonging to mahogany furniture either powdered whiting or scraped rotten-stone mixed with sweet-oil and rubbed on with a buckskin is good. 553. The ...
-Misc Facts. Part 7
566. To Destroy Flies To Destroy Flies in room, take half a tea-spoonful 01 black pepper in powder, one tea-spoonful of brown sugar, and one table-spoonful of cream, mix them well together, and ...
-Popular Books
Sent Free Of Postage At The Price Annexed 1. Chesterfield's Art of tetter-Writing Simplified........$0 12 1/2 3. The Laws of Love.............. .................................. 25 3. Gamblers' Tr...
-Popular Books. Part 2
BEAUTIFUL WOOD ENGRAVINGS Which render the Text clear, and fully explain all the Puzzles, the Mechanical Contrivances mentioned, and other things difficult to describe in writing. It is elegantly bou...
-Popular Books. Part 3
No pains have been spared by the Author to make this a popular book, in fact a book for the million, and some idea may be formed of its vast usefulness when we inform the reader that THE REASON WHY ha...
-Popular Books. Part 4
Copies of either of the above books sent to any address in the United States or Canada. Send cash orders to DICK &FITZGERALD, Publishers, No. 18 Ann Street, New York. Modest yet Amusing - Curious y...
-Popular Books. Part 5
Large 12mo., nearly 400 Pages, Illustrated with 200 Comic Engravings, and bound in fine Cloth, with gilt side and hack Stamp. PRICE ONE DOLLAR AND TWENTY-FIVE CENTS. Copies mailed to any address in ...
-Popular Books. Part 6
There is no imaginable species of fancy needle-work, knitting, knotting, netting, lace-work, embroidery, crochet, etc. etc, which may not be found fully illustrated in this volume, and here are comple...
-Popular Books. Part 7
Send cash orders to DICK & FITZGERALD, No. 18 Ann St. N. Y. JUDGE HALIBURTON's WORKS. The writings of Judge Haliburton have long been regarded as the production of the finest humorist that has eve...









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