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Household Companion: The Home Book Of Etiquette



Every one has a smile and a helping hand for the courteous man or woman, while the rude person, even if mistaken through ignorance, offends everybody. Ordinary politeness is so much governed by custom that it is easy for anyone to learn and use in every-day life; and all these rules are given in this book sensibly as practised by the best society. The etiquette of conversation, parties of all kinds, visiting, receiving guests, weddings, funerals, and all private and public occasions, is made clear and easy to follow with confidence. There are also valuable instructions in the art of letter-writing, and what to wear on all occasions.

TitleHousehold Companion: Book Of Etiquette
AuthorAlice A. Johnson, Mrs. Janet McKenzie Hill, Dr. Henry HartShorne
PublisherM.L. Dewsnap
Year1909
Copyright1909

A Practical Reference Work For Housekeepers

Household Companion

---------Comprising--------

A Complete Cook Book—Practical Household Recipes, Aids And Hints For Household Decorations; The Care Of Domestic Plants And Animals And A Treatise On Domestic Medicine

Including a Chapter on TUBERCULOSIS The Great White Plague A CURABLE AND PREVENTABLE DISEASE

—By—

Dr. Lawrence F. Flick

Medical Director of the Henry Phipps Institute for the Study, Treatment and Prevention of Tuberculosis

General Editors Of The Work:

  • Alice A. Johnson -- Graduate in Domestic Science of Drexel Institute, Philadelphia
  • Mrs. Janet McKenzie Hill -- Editor of the Boston Cooking School Journal
  • Dr. Henry Hartshorne, M.D.. Ll.D. -- Author of "Essential of Practical Medicine"
  • and Other Specialists

Profusely Illustrated With Color Plates, Half-Tone Engravings and Text Pictures

Copyright 1909, by M. L. DBWSNAP

-Book Of Etiquette: Introduction
What To Do What To Wear What To Say What To Write. The Correct Thing At Home At Parties At Weddings At Al Public And Private Functions Every one has a smile ...
-General Principles Of Good Manners
Good manners stand next to a good heart in adapting men and women to the community in which they live. Indeed, so far as the opinion of ordinary society rules, ...
-The Art of Conversation.
To one who would make his way in the society of intelligent people, a well-selected fund of information and anecdote is a highly important prerequisite. An ...
-Avoid Heated Argument.
Speech is so vital an element of social intercourse that too much attention cannot be given to its requisites, or too much study to its cultivation. In ...
-Consider the Feelings of Others.
Do not speak in a loud voice or assume a dictatorial tone, and if a statement is made which you know to be incorrect, be careful of the manner in which you ...
-Care in the Use of Witticisms.
If you have wit, or fancy you have, which is oftener the case, it is well to use it with caution and judgment, and particularly to avoid seeking butts for your ...
-All Can be Agreeable.
It is not given to every man to be a brilliant talker, or to express himself in writing with elegance or force. Both of these are gifts of the few, not ...
-Avoid Referring to Your Own Exploits.
Talk of yourself and your own affairs as little as possible, and bear in mind that to drag into a general conversation the names of distinguished persons to ...
-Other Rules Worth Observing.
Should a person enter the room in which you are conversing, and the conversation be continued after his arrival, it is only courteous to acquaint him with the ...
-A Winning Manner.
Another important element of social deportment is a graceful and easy bearing, and that softness and amiability of manner which is so engaging in our ...
-Principles of Politeness.
Another important point in decorum is, not to force upon others our own present humor or passing sentiment, but to observe and adopt theirs. If for the moment ...
-Good Breeding.
Yet there are every where particular ceremonial requisites of good breeding, often of local application, which, being arbitrary or accidental, can be learned ...
-The Demeanor of a Lady.
An agreeable, modest, and dignified bearing is not only one of the most desirable requisites of a young woman, but her best warrant to claim the title of lady.
-Incivilities to be Avoided.
Such suggestions are hardly necessary. The instinct of a true lady will teach her to observe these basic rules of courtesy. Yet there is a heedlessness in many ...
-Flirtation.
With regard to flirtation, it is difficult to draw a limit where the predilection of the moment softens into a more tender and serious feeling, and flirtation ...
-The Art Of Dress
The fashion of attire is a question of the passing day; its aesthetics is a question of the ages. Persons of taste will avoid the ridiculous, whatever may be ...
-A Well-Dressed Woman.
Some one says that as a work of art a veil-dressed woman is a study. The toilette of such a person is always well chosen, with consideration of its purpose, ...
-Dress for Various Occasions.
Morning dress should be faultless in its way. For young ladies, whether married or single, there is no prettier summer morning wear than white or very light ...
-Suitability of Apparel.
Suit your dresses to the occasions upon which they are to be used. In the morning, at home, a lady may wear a loose, flowing dress, made high in the neck, with ...
-Public Occasions.
The fashion of the time must govern the evening dress for public occasions. Full dress must always be worn, but it is impossible to give any fixed rule ...
-Jewelry.
Much display of jewelry is out of place for young ladies, and the kind of jewelry to be worn demands as careful consideration is that of the dress itself.
-Traveling Dress.
Traveling costume should be simple in style and quiet in color, materials that will not show dirt being preferable. A waterproof cloak is a very desirable ...
-A Well-Dressed Man.
Buffon has remarked that a man's clothes are a part of himself, and enter into our conception of his character. And certainly no man who is experienced in the ...
-Appropriate Costume.
You should dress according to your occupation and means. If you are a salesman, you would not think it appropriate to appear in the regulation garb of a bishop.
-The Shirt Waist.
In the summer of 1900 the shirt-waist, which was worn almost universally by women, was emulated by men, many of whom assumed, during business hours, unstarched ...
-Introductions
The laws of society do not permit you to claim acquaintance with other persons unless you have been properly introduced, though in traveling this rule may ...
-Rules of Introduction.
In England, visitors meeting in the same house are expected to enter into conversation, though no formal presentation has been made, and no previous ...
-The Introducer's Formula.
In introductions the common formula is : Mrs. Blank, may I, or allow me to present, or introduce, Mr. Smith. Never reverse this order, and so introduce the ...
-Salutations.
In meeting a friend upon the street, or in company, you should salute him cordially, but quietly and respectfully. A gentleman should always salute a lady by ...
-Calls, Formal and Informal.
Residents of large cities should call in person upon all their acquaintances at least once a year, if circumstances permit, and should pay additional visits to ...
-Ending a Call.
When a call is ended it is customary among the best bred people to ring for a servant to open the front door for a visitor. Some persons prefer to attend ...
-Visiting and Visitors
Visits of friendship are governed by no set rules of etiquette, and need not be formal either as to length or manner. It is to be presumed that friends or ...
-Evening Calls.
In many communities, where it is customary to make formal evening calls after dinner, the usual hour is from nine to ten o'clock. In making an informal evening ...
-Entertaining Guests.
Do not bore visitors by constantly trying to amuse them. After means of amusement have been provided, let it be optional with them as to whether they avail ...
-Bidding Quests Adieu.
While it is not wise to disarrange the regular routine of a household on account of the arrival of a guest, a reasonable time should be devoted to the ...
-Engraved or Printed Cards.
The extent to which the use of visiting cards is sometimes extended furnishes occasion to some, unused to polite society, to ridicule what they call pasteboard ...
-Rules for Leaving Cards.
In making the first call of the season, a lady leaves with her own, her husband's card, and also those of her sons and daughters. After a dinner party, or ...
-Balls And Evening Parties
It is in the evening party that society puts on its gayest aspect, and is on its best behavior. Here everything is regulated by a strict code of observance, ...
-Subscription Dances.
In most of the large cities several series of dances are arranged by certain leaders in the social world to which people are invited to subscribe. Each ...
-The Dressing Room.
A cloak-room for ladies must be provided, with maids to receive shawls and cloaks and to render such other assistance as may be required. It should contain ...
-The Question of Toilette.
Ladies may wear as handsome dresses as they wish, and make their fullest display of jewelry. As everything about a ball-room should be light and attractive, it ...
-In the Ball-Room.
In a private ball or party, guests, on entering, should at once proceed to pay their respects to the lady of the house, who will remain near the door to greet ...
-Requests to Dance.
The former fashion of saying, May I have the pleasure of dancing with you? has now given place to a less formal method, and a young man may accost a young lady ...
-In the Dance.
When a lady has accepted an invitation to dance, the gentleman offers her his right arm, and leads her to her place on the floor. A slight knowledge of the ...
-Taking Supper.
The gentleman who dances with a lady in the last dance before supper, conducts her to the supper-room, attends on her while there, and escorts her back to the ...
-After the Ball.
Assemblies of this kind should be left quietly. If the party is small, it is permissible to bow to the hostess; but at a large ball this is not necessary, ...
-VI. Breakfast, Luncheon And Tea
The hour at which breakfast shall be served is governed entirely by the habits and tastes of the family. Where it is very late, it is often preceded by the ...
-Luncheon.
In imitation of the French, the meal which in our country is usually called lunch or luncheon, is sometimes designated as breakfast. It may either be 'formal, ...
-Teas and Afternoon Receptions.
These are among the most informal entertainments given, and the difference between a large afternoon tea and an afternoon reception is little more than the ...
-Suppers.
Supper, as a rule, is similar to dinner, and unless served at a ball or as a part of some other entertainment has very much the character of that meal. After ...
-Picnics.
If one person gives a picnic he must provide everything, the modes of conveyance to the place selected, the refreshments, entertainment, etc., but if several ...
-Theatre Parties.
A dinner, either at home or at a restaurant, is frequently followed by a visit to the theatre or the opera. In such a case it is proper for the one who gives ...
-Chaperons.
The word chaperon is French, and signifies a married lady, or one of sufficient age and dignity to accompany an unmarried one with propriety to any reputable ...
-VII. Banquets And Dinners
The formal dinner is one of the most important occasions in social life, the test to which the degree of acquaintance of any one with the customs of good ...
-Choosing Guests.
In giving a dinner party, the first and often the most important question is, whom to invite. How many to invite follows as a problem of little less importance.
-Duties of the Hostess.
A dinner party is regarded by many persons as the most formal and, at the same time, the most elegant mode of entertaining guests--it is certainly the one ...
-Arranging the Table.
In the centre of the table should be either a vase of flowers or a dish of fruit. Fern? make a very attractive effect. There should be small dishes of candies, ...
-Placing the Table-Ware.
On the right of the space left for the plate place two knives and a spoon. The present mode is to use silver knives as well as forks for fish, and in that case ...
-Dress.
As regards dress for a dinner party, it must be governed in great measure by the character of the dinner, whether friendly and informal, or an occasion of ...
-Entering the Dining Room.
If the dinner is to be a large and formal one, a gentleman should receive an envelope before entering the drawing-room in which is a card bearing the name of ...
-The Dinner.
It is not easy to lay down any fixed rule for the character of the dinner. That must be governed by the season and the taste and resources of the host. However ...
-Dinner Courses.
The dinner may begin with oysters on the half shell, five or six for each person. If not the season for oysters, small clams are frequently served in the same ...
-After the Courses.
Everything except the lights and ornaments should be removed from the table before the dessert is served, the crumbs being brushed off with a crumb-scraper or ...
-Retiring from the Table.
Then the hostess bows to the lady of most distinction present, and all the ladies rise and prepare to retire. The gentleman nearest the door opens it, and ...
-General Hints.
You should sit at a convenient distance from the table, and sit upright. Do not lean back, or tilt your chair, or stoop forward towards the table. When grace ...
-Wines.
As regards the use of wines at dinner, the following rules will suffice. They should be served in the following succession. First. Sherry, which must be very ...
-Dinners at Restaurants.
When a dinner is given at a public restaurant, a table can be reserved in the public dining-room, or a private room can be engaged. It is usual to order the ...
-VIII. Courtship And Marriage
Preceding the marriage comes the courtship, an event which, since the world began, has been one of vital interest to man and woman, but which is so varied in ...
-Wedding Preliminaries.
After the wedding day is fixed the happy couple are especially obliged to conform to the rules of etiquette, there being fixed laws laid down for every detail ...
-Bridal Gifts.
The custom of presenting gifts to the bride has grown until it has become much of a burden and something of a farce, from the absolute uselessness of many of ...
-Flowers.
The bride's bouquet should be composed exclusively of white flowers, such as gardenias, white azaleas, or camellias, with a little orange blossom intertwined.
-The Bridesmaids.
The bridesmaids are usually selected from among the sisters of the bride, or her cousins or friends. The head-bridesmaid is ordinarily her most intimate friend.
-The Groomsmen.
The number of groomsmen must correspond to that of the bridesmaids. These gentlemen have little to do, with the exception of the first or principal groomsman, ...
-The Bride.
After the wedding invitations are issued the bride does not ordinarily appear in public. On the morning of the wedding day she usually breakfasts in her own ...
-The Ceremony.
The ushers are selected by the gentleman, though the lady is generally consulted in the choice. Six is the number ordinarily chosen, and their duties are to ...
-The Wedding Breakfast.
The English fashion of a wedding-break fast is now often followed in this country, the guests being specially invited a fortnight in advance. On such an ...
-A House Wedding.
A fashionable wedding at home calls into requisition the services of both florist and caterer; the former to decorate the rooms, the latter to furnish the ...
-Sending Cards.
In some circles the young couple send out cards with their wedding invitations, stating the day and hour they will receive callers after their return from ...
-IX. Funeral Etiquette.
The great sorrow brought upon a family by the death of one of its members often renders the immediate relatives incapable of properly attending to the ...
-The House Services.
When the funeral is at the house, some near relative or intimate friend should act as usher, and show the company to their seats. A decorous silence should be ...
-Funeral Etiquette: Flowers.
With regard to sending flowers, the wishes of the family should be considered. If you are uncertain upon this point, it is safe to send them. They should be ...
-Mourning.
The length of time for wearing mourning has greatly decreased during the past five years, as formerly there was such an exaggeration of this that sometimes the ...
-X. Anniversary And Other Occasions
Among the festivities which society provides for its enjoyment, that of the anniversary wedding has of late years come greatly into vogue. It is a pleasant ...
-Gifts and Invitations.
A leading feature on these occasions is the sending of gifts, which are expected to be made of the material which gives the name to the wedding, and much ...
-Christenings.
Another occasion incident to married life, is the christening, which next demands consideration at our hands. When children are to be christened at home, it is ...
-Private Theatricals.
The private theatrical provides an entertainment which is daily growing in popularity both in England and our own country. Sometimes a stage is erected in a ...
-Etiquette for General Occasions.
There are, or should be, rules of etiquette applicable to every situation, the home circle, the street, the store, the traveling conveyance, and in short for ...
-Etiquette of the Household.
First among these requisites comes the etiquette of the home circle, in which the principle of politeness and courtesy are often laid aside as a consequence of ...
-Table Manners.
In conclusion a few rules of importance in table manners, familiar to most, but too often carelessly ignored, may be given. The napkin should be spread over ...
-Etiquette of the Street.
Courtesy requires the return of all civil greetings--those of servants included. Only the most serious causes can justify -'a cut. In bowing, the head should ...
-Etiquette In the Electric Car.
If a gentleman desires to offer his seat to a lady, he should not beckon to her, but rise and offer it to her courteously. It is the duty of the lady, in ...
-Etiquette of Business.
Never forget that time is precious to some persons, though you may be ready to waste it; also that money is necessary, and that it is every one's duty to ...
-Etiquette of the Club.
Doubtless, while there are few members of clubs who do not have a sufficient knowledge of the rules of etiquette governing them, some may desire information on ...
-Etiquette of Traveling.
Ladies should wear neat traveling dresses of suitable material and simple style, display as little jewelry as possible, and carry the smallest amount of ...
-Table Etiquette for Children.
It may not be out of place to add here a few good old rules for children's behavior at table which can safely be followed : Give the child a seat that snail be ...
-XI. Forms of Invitations.
In issuing invitations for any occasion, they should be sent out as nearly as possible together, and in ample season. If they be for a large reception, dinner, ...
-Invitations to Parties.
The following will serve as a correct form for a note of invitation to a private party : Mrs. William H. Johnson requests the pleasure of Mr. and Mrs. James ...
-Dinner Invitations.
Dinner invitations are written or engraved in the name of both husband and wife: Mr. and Mrs. Henry Wilson request the pleasure of Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Clayton' ...
-Small Entertainments.
Visiting-cards must not be used either to accept invitations or to regret the necessity of declining them, though invitations to small entertainments may with ...
-Form of English Invitations.
The following is the style often used in England for invitations to garden parties, etc. : Mr. and Mrs. Jones request the pleasure of Mr. and Mrs. Robinson's ...
-Wedding Invitations.
Invitations to marriage ceremonies are issued in the name of the bride's parents, or, if both are dead, in the name of a near relative or guardian. Paper ...
-General Invitations.
In addition to the forms of invitation to more or less formal occasions above given, notes inviting to various informal meetings may take forms familiar or the ...
-XII. Art Of Letter-Writing
A correspondence between two persons is simply a conversation reduced to writing. We should write to an absent person as we would speak to the same party if ...
-Style in Correspondence.
The style of the letter may rise with the subject, and with the character of the person written to. In a familiar epistle an effort at dignity of style is ...
-Forms of Address.
The conventional forms are Sir, Dear Sir, My Dear Sir, or Madam, Dear Madam, or My Dear Madam. Either of these can be used, but to a total stranger My Dear Sir ...
-Letters of Recommendation.
A letter of recommendation should be composed with careful attention to its statements. It is a guarantee for the party recommended, and truth should never be ...
-Letters of Introduction.
Letters of introduction are one of the common methods of establishing social relations. The person who is not known to your friend can become known through ...
-Letters of Congratulation or Condolence.
Epistles of this kind need to be very carefully written. Unless there is some actual sympathy in the mind of the writer, they had better, in many cases, be ...
-Replying to Letters.
Every letter, that is not insulting, merits a reply, if it be required or necessary. If the letter contains a request, it should either be acceded to ...
-Punctuation.
Punctuation is a matter of the utmost importance in every species of literary composition; without it there can be no clearness, strength, or accuracy. Its ...
-Postscripts.
Lady writers have been accused, and perhaps with some reason, of often reserving the most important part of a letter for the postscript. It is an accusation ...
-XIII. Forms Of Correspondence.
Having given in the preceding sections some hints as to letter-writing and examples of notes of invitation, acceptance, and declination, it seems important to ...
-Forms Of Correspondence. part 2
Introducing a Friend. St. Louis, Mo., fan. 3, 1901. Dear James B. : This letter will introduce to you my dear friend William White, who is to be in your city ...
-Forms Of Correspondence. part 3
Congratulating a Gentleman Upon His Marriage. Wilmington, Ohio, Sept. 12, 1900. Dear Frank : I have just received the welcome message informing me of your new ...
-Forms Of Correspondence. part 4
A Letter Sent with a Gift (a Book). 977 President St., Brookly N, Y., Dec. 20, 190 My Dear Friend: I hope the accompanying volume, of which I ask your ...
-Forms Of Correspondence. part 5
Soliciting a Loan from a Friend. 2790 N. Broad St., Philadelphia, Sept. 9, 1903. My Dear Sir : A disappointment in the receipt of some money due has exposed me ...
-Forms Of Correspondence. part 6
A Letter to a Friend (on the Anniversary of his Birthday. 1917 Green Street , Philadelphia, July 3, 190-. My Dear Walter: Birthdays may be called the ...
-Forms Of Correspondence. part 7
Requesting a Friend to execute a Commission. Santiago, Cuba, April 15, 1902. My Dear Emma: Will you kindly execute the following little commissions for me, as ...
-Forms Of Correspondence. part 8
Letters of Application. BOY WANTED for Transportation Office; must be good penman; $15 per month. Address, in own handwriting, H, 236 Ledger Office.
-Forms Of Correspondence. part 9
Requesting the Settlement of an Account. Newark, N.J., Dec. 25, 1900. Mr. James Jones, Burlington, N.J. Dear Sir : I call your attention to the fact that your ...
-Social Letters.
Let these be original and not be like the epistles of some one else; write as you would talk, but always exercise care in the use of pure, simple language and ...
-From Charles Dickens to James T. Fields.
As an excellent example of a reply to a letter conveying pleasant wishes, we present the following from Dickens : Gad's Hill,June 10, 1867. My Dear Fields : ...
-From Charles Sumner on Leaving for Europe to his Ten-year Old Sister.
Astor Honse, New York, Dec. 7, 1837 My Dear Julia : I don't remember that I ever wrote you a letter. I feel confident, however, that your correspondence is not ...
-Etiquette Of Beauty
During all civilized ages the art of beauty has been sedulously studied and practiced by the fair sex, women in all periods since the days of barbarism having ...
-How to Grow Old Gracefully.
A charming old lady revealed the secret of her fair and rosy complexion to a group of young women as follows : Late hours, said she, and oversleeping ruin the ...
-Care of the Body.
Wear warm, light garments, to secure an even temperature. In winter it is even more important to protect the spine than the chest. Wear a silk sleeveless ...
-The Bath-Room.
The furnishing of the bath-room depends largely upon the means and taste of its owner. It is no difficult matter to furnish a simple bath-room, in which ...
-A Woman's Dressing-Room.
A woman's dressing-room should be as tasteful and comfortable as her social position and fortune permit: simply comfortable if she cannot afford luxury, but ...
-The Complexion.
It is generally thought that the color and texture of the skin may be improved by external means. This is partially the truth, but is largely an error, since ...
-Facial Ablutions.
It is well known that the pores of the skin should be kept open in order to perform thoroughly their functions, and that washing is an excellent means to ...
-To Remove Sunburn.
Bathe your face at night with a cold infusion of fresh cucumbers sliced in milk. A decoction of tansy in buttermilk is still more efficacious. Buttermilk alone ...
-Freckles.
Freckles are the despair of blondes, and even of brunettes with fair skins. Some physicians attribute them to too much iron in the blood, and think that they ...
-Depilatories.
The growth of hair which so often appears on the chin at middle age, and the down which imparts a masculine appearance to the rosy lips of some young girls of ...
-Face Washes and Cosmetics.
Never use any kind of paint on the face. All rouges injure the skin. Blanc de perle is dangerous. Greasy skins are benefited by washing in the juice of fresh ...
-The Use of Rice Powder.
It is sometimes necessary to powder the face, but powder should be applied lightly and artistically in order to impart to the skin the velvety softness of the ...
-Acne or Blackheads.
Acne is the commonest form of facial eruption, it appearing as small black points on the nose, cheeks, and chin. Each speck marks an obstructed outlet of the ...
-Redness of the Nose.
If this affliction is due to the dryness of the nasal passage or the delicacy of the capillary vessels, the inflamed condition may easily be removed. The ...
-Cleansing of the Hair.
The frequent use of a fine comb is fatal to hair, especially when it is falling out. However, it is necessary to cleanse the hair and the downy scalp. The ...
-Diseases of the Hair.
Dandruff is not only very disagreeable, but produces baldness. Before resorting to medical treatment for this disease, which is sometimes obstinate, because it ...
-Baldness.
Baldness is not so serious a matter to a man as to a woman, for he has the comfort of knowing that he has many companions in his misery. But a bald woman is ...
-Remedies for Falling Hair.
The juice of a lemon applied to the scalp is said to be a remedy for the falling out of dark hair. The following recipe has been used successfully : Wash the ...
-Cleansing of Combs and Brushes.
Nothing is better for cleansing brushes than ammonia; it does not soften the bristles, as soap and soda do. Put a teaspoonful of ammonia into a quart of water, ...
-Care of the Eyes.
Never rub the eyes, for this practice causes inflammation of the lids, and however beautiful the expression, if the eyes are red or without lashes, they lose ...
-Care of the Teeth.
Cleanliness is one of the surest means for overcoming the causes which lead to the destruction of the teeth. They should be carefully brushed night and morning; ...
-Care of the Hands.
In doing housework or gardening, old gloves which have lost their freshness and grown large by use may be worn. They will protect the hands from the effects of ...
-Washing the Hands During the Day.
Never have soiled hands, but do not wash oftener than necessary. Lemon juice will remove many stains. If a little salt is added to this juice it is still more ...
-Sunburned Hands.
At the close of summer, hands which have been kissed too often by the sun are a source of annoyance. The present rage for out-of-door sports, such as croquet, ...
-Chapped Hands.
For children, and even for many grown persons, winter is the time for chapped hands. It requires but little care to avoid the suffering which results from ...
-Chilblains.
Chilblains are still more to be feared than chapping. A feeble temperament and bad nourishment are often the causes of this affection. One should walk a great ...
-Care of the Nails.
The nails should be cut in a curve which follows the shape of the end of the finger. Their surface should also be polished. One hour a week spent in caring for ...
-Good Taste in Dressing.
The question of dress is one of leading importance in modern society, and the woman who affects indifference to it lacks judgment. A woman who dresses badly ...
-Concerning Ăsthetics.
One must be a pretty and agreeable woman as well as a good wife and mother to keep the husband and father fond of his home. It is often possible to become ...
-The Art of Appearing Always Young.
As a charming old lady once said, To remain always young one must be always amiable. A melancholy face, a sullen or evil look, is like coming in contact with ...
-Grace of Movement.
To be graceful, harmony must govern our movements. There are women who possess in a superior degree the intuition of harmony, who select unconsciously their ...
-Grace of Form.
To retain your graceful form, then, learn how to carry yourself. If women would be more careful about this while young, they would have finer figures and more ...









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