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The Out Of Door Library: Athletic Sports | by D. A. Sargent



The Physical Proportions Of The Typical Man - Physical Characteristics Of The Athlete - Golf - Lawn Tennis - Bicycling: Wheel Of To-Day, Woman & The Bicycle, A Doctor'S View Of Bicycling - Surf & Surf-Bathing - Country Clubs & Hunt Clubs In America

TitleThe Out Of Door Library: Athletic Sports
AuthorD. A. Sargent
PublisherCharles Scribner's Sons
Year1897
Copyright1897, Charles Scribner's Sons
AmazonThe Out of Door Library, Athletic Sports

By D. A. Sargent, M.D. H.J. Whigham Robert D. Wrenn P. G. Hubert, Jr. Marguerite Merington J. West Roosevelt, M.D. Duffield Osborne Edward S. Martin

-The Physical Proportions Of The Typical Man
By D. A. Sargent, M.D. AT no time in the history of our country has more attention been given to the subject of physical training than is given to it at the present day. Schools, colleges, and Christ...
-The Physical Proportions Of The Typical Man. Part 2
(v.) By depriving the non-athletic class of every incentive to physical exertion. So long as accomplishing a feat, winning a prize, and breaking a record, are the only objects of systematic physical t...
-The Physical Proportions Of The Typical Man. Part 3
We have had no end of treatises on the sports, games, and gymnastic exercises that are reputed to give strength and symmetry to the body; but, unfortunately, the wise and good men of old have left us ...
-The Physical Proportions Of The Typical Man. Part 4
In order to form some idea of the general strength of the individual, the results of the several tests were summed up. The amount represented the total strength so far as determined. I should add that...
-The Physical Proportions Of The Typical Man. Part 5
Figure D. The undergoing of present hardship for the sake of future gain is one of the most encouraging features connected with athletic sports and games. That the participants may be in the best p...
-The Physical Proportions Of The Typical Man. Part 6
That the unit of measurement should be as small as possible, owing to the tendency of many observers to record a measurement at the nearest whole number, the metric system was adopted. In computing t...
-The Physical Proportions Of The Typical Man. Part 7
Upon the whole, the strength is in excess of the development, and the condition is favorable. The weak points are the waist, loins, and abdomen. Figs. C, D, E, as shown in Chart II., represent a you...
-The Physical Proportions Of The Typical Man. Part 8
In this case the dotted line on the chart, indicating the actual and relative standing of the individual at all the parts considered, would be perpendicular. This is the grand object to be attained. T...
-Physical Characteristics Of The Athlete
By D. A. Sargent, M.D. IN spite of their objectionable tendencies, the beneficial effects of athletic sports upon the development of the physique are evident. The nature of this development is gove...
-Physical Characteristics Of The Athlete. Part 2
Figure 4. Figure 4. - W------, Harvard Law School; age, 22 years, 4 months; weight, 136 lbs.; height, 5 feet, 10.3 inches. Holds no records, but has won the quarter-mile race in the Intercollegiat...
-Physical Characteristics Of The Athlete. Part 3
Figure 5, b. (See description, page 61.) The strength of the back, legs, and forearm are deficient, and the total strength is small for the total development. In looking at the chart as a whole, t...
-Physical Characteristics Of The Athlete. Part 4
Figure 7. Figs. 7 and 8, a, b (pages 70 - 73), and Chart IV. (page 74), represent two young men whose peculiar development characterizes another branch of athletics. Fig. 7 has the college record a...
-Physical Characteristics Of The Athlete. Part 5
Figs. 9, 10, and 11, a, b (pages 77-81), Chart V. (page 82), introduce us to men prominent in another branch of athletics. In each case the weight falls near the ninety-five per cent class, though the...
-Physical Characteristics Of The Athlete. Part 6
Figs. 13, 12. Chart VI., plotted from Figs. 12 and 13. In rowing, the back takes the greatest portion of the strain, unless the friction of the seat is excessive, in which case a double duty is impo...
-Physical Characteristics Of The Athlete. Part 7
These two men are base-ball players of some prominence. As a base-ball pitcher offers the batters from two hundred to three hundred balls a game, superior development of the right arm and shoulder is ...
-Physical Characteristics Of The Athlete. Part 8
Figure 16, c. {See description, page 95.) start with, and by dint of systematic exercise and correct habits of living, this young man has worked his way up through the fifty, sixty, seventy, and eig...
-Golf
By H. J. Whigham (Amateur Champion of the United States, 1896) Illustrations by A. B. Frost Shinnecock Hills Golf Club. IT is natural that a game which has formed the chief recreation of the S...
-Golf. Part 2
A Clean Miss. Uncertain Arithmetic. Willie Dunn's Shop at Shinnecock. Then, again, we are not surprised to find that Mr. J. E. Laidlay, who is without doubt the most brilliant match player of...
-Golf. Part 3
Temper. Farmhouse formerly used as a Club-house by the Chicago Golf Club. This was only one aspect of the movement, however; and now that the pencilling disease has more or less abated, it is on...
-Golf. Part 4
On the Green. Now, the courses which are laid out on this sand-belt of Enthusiasm. Great Britain are not held to be best because they are recommended by custom, but because it only requires a s...
-Golf. Part 5
A Good Lie. As far as I am able to judge, there are many nine-hole courses in the East which are admirably constructed, - Meadow-brook, for instance, being very well laid out; but there is not one ...
-Golf. Part 6
A Foozle. The rules of golf have always presented a difficulty to those who are intrusted with the care of framing them; and since there are many points under discussion at the present moment of writ...
-Golf. Part 7
One word should be said about the courtesies of the game. There is no pursuit in life which exhibits the best and the worst of a man so freely as the game of golf. That a control of the temper is abso...
-Lawn Tennis
By Robert D. Wrenn THOUGH the tennis enthusiast is loath to admit the fact, it must be conceded that during the last two years lawn tennis has not held its own in this country, or, in fact, abroad....
-Lawn Tennis. Continued
End of Under-hand Twist Service. Fore-hand Stroke. It is but natural that as success attends one line of play, we are tempted to overdo it, forgetting that by too constant use we teach an oppone...
-Bicycling
The Wheel of To Day By Philip G. Hubert, Jr. Woman and the Bicycle By Marguerite Merington. A Doctor's View of Bicycling By J. West Roosevelt, M.D. I. The wheel Of To-Day By Philip G. Hubert, Jr. ...
-Bicycling. Part 2
The Grand Circle at Fifty-ninth Street and Eighth Avenue, New York. While the Safety pattern made the bicycle possible to every one, of course the pneumatic tire is a great invention. Persons who h...
-Bicycling. Part 3
The much-talked-of bamboo and aluminum bicycles may come under the head of attempts to get rid of weight. In the bamboo bicycle, rods of polished bamboo, let into aluminum castings, are used for the f...
-Bicycling. Part 4
There are people who declare that there is a certain maliciousness about a bicycle's behavior nothing short of the miraculous. Doubtless we riders all remember the delight every bicycle takes in guidi...
-Bicycling. Part 5
Tea at the Michaux Club. A friend with whom I once made a bicycle tour believes that the expense of such trips could be much reduced by eliminating the hotel, and camping out. His plan necessitates...
-II. Woman And The Bicycle
By Marguerite Merington THE collocation of woman and the bicycle has not wholly outgrown controversy; but if the woman's taste be for the royal pleasure of glowing exercise in sunlit air, she will ...
-III. A Doctor's View Of Bicycling
By J. West Roosevelt, M.D. WHEN a person whose muscular system is not already well developed by other exercise begins riding the bicycle, he will probably be surprised to find (unless the various b...
-Surf And Surf-Bathing
By Duffield Osborne THE popularity of surf-bathing as a sport may be said to be of fairly recent growth in this country. Although few, perhaps, realize the fact, it is nevertheless true that most...
-Surf And Surf-Bathing. Part 2
In spite of all its changes, however, the surf has sometimes local characteristics as fixed as anything can be with which the fickle ocean has to do. For instance, on the Atlantic coast the storms are...
-Surf And Surf-Bathing. Part 3
Figure 3. And now, standing upon the dunes, our eyes have wandered over the expanse of ocean with a glance more critical and inquiring as it drew near the shore. The salt savor of the breeze is at ...
-Surf And Surf-Bathing. Part 4
Sometimes it will happen that you cannot get far enough out in time to meet these big seas at the proper point; and then it is that your reputation as a surf-man will be in danger, at least among thos...
-Surf And Surf-Bathing. Part 5
Figure 10. In all that has been said, bear in mind that the cardinal secret of surf-bathing, in all contingencies, is proper balancing, and nothing but experience seconding knowledge can teach you to...
-Country Clubs And Hunt Clubs In America
By Edward S. Martin A LONG time ago men discovered that by clubbing together they could maintain a town house on a scale of comfort and even luxury which would be very much beyond the individual me...
-Country Clubs And Hunt Clubs In America. Part 2
The Brook-line Country Club is about five miles from the busi-ness centre of Boston. Good roads lead to it from all directions, and make it accessible by driving from Boston and most of the suburban c...
-Country Clubs And Hunt Clubs In America. Part 3
He wants something that will test his horse's capacity and, at the same time, his own nerve. Sometimes he finds it in polo; but unless he is young and ardently athletic, he is apt to find it more to h...
-Country Clubs And Hunt Clubs In America. Part 4
Lunch on Race-day at the Kennels, the Headquarters of the Elkridg-e, Md., Hunt Club. The Start from the Kennels. The Elkridge, Md., Club. Cedarhurst, the seat of the Rockaway Club, is only tw...
-Country Clubs And Hunt Clubs In America. Part 5
Headquarters of the Green Spring Valley Hunt Club - the Old Stone Tavern on the Reisterstown Turnpike, Baltimore County, Md. In Virginia, Maryland, the Carolinas, and Georgia, there has always been...
-Country Clubs And Hunt Clubs In America. Part 6
Meet of the Meadowbrook Hunt at Mr. Theodore Roosevelt 's house, Oyster Bay, Long Island. A Meet of the. The best hunting in the Genesee Valley is in November and December. The prettiest and gay...
-Country Clubs And Hunt Clubs In America. Part 7
Once the idea of the possibility of hunting is disseminated, the rest will take care of itself, and clubs will spring up where there is a demand for them. Chicago has everything that it wants. It will...









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