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Football: How To Watch It | by Percy D. Haughton



The reader who wants to know how to listen to music or what to observe in a picture gallery may readily find all this information conveniently gathered in book form. Accordingly, it is fitting that to this informative library there should be added a book of football for the spectator. I maintain that football is an art as well as a sport. Percy Haughton belongs without doubt among the old masters. Of course, his position is complicated a little by the fact that he is also in the ranks of the moderns.

TitleFootball How To Watch It
AuthorPercy D. Haughton
PublisherMarshall Jones Company
Year1922
Copyright1922, Marshall Jones Company
AmazonFootball And How To Watch It

By Percy D. Haughton, Haryard Coach, 1908-1916

Introduction By Heywood Broun

To Those Football Players Whom I Have Had The Great Privilege of Teaching, And Who, In Spite of Mental Weariness And Physical Strain. Responded To My Suggestions With Their Entire Will, This Book Is Dedicated In Friendship And Appreciation

-Introduction
The reader who wants to know how to listen to music or what to observe in a picture gallery may readily find all this information conveniently gathered in book form. Accordingly, it is fitting that to...
-Preface
WHEN properly understood, Football is both mentally and physically such a glorious sport that it seems a pity that so many who witness it should not be conversant with its salient points. The word me...
-I. How To Watch And Understand Football
ARE YOU READY, HARVARD? Are you ready, Yale? The referee blows his whistle. It is a supreme moment. The pent-up feelings of the past year are suddenly released and one is brought face to face with...
-Plate II. A Plunge Play
THE offense are seen advancing from left to right. The line has through a superior charge obtained a distinct advantage over their opponents and formed a pocket into which the runner is darting. One o...
-Plate IV. A Rush Which Failed
THE runner (3) is seen firmly tackled by two of the defense on the line of scrimmage. However, the faithful interference has assumed the play will be a success and is attempting to clean up The defens...
-Plate VI. A Punt
THE offense have kicked from right to left. Less than three seconds has elapsed since the bail was put in play. The defense have made a valiant attempt to block the kick (see player with upraised arms...
-Plate VI. A Punt. Continued
Now let us for the moment step into the shoes, or rather look into the brain, of the offensive quarterback and view the kind of precepts which are stored there. Mind you, this is only the A B C of qua...
-Plate VIII. An Unusually Successful Forward Pass
RARELY does the offense succeed in deluding the defense to such a marked degree. The play had all the appearance of a rush at its inception but by the clever passage of the ball from one player to ano...
-Plate X. As Seen From The Side Lines
THIS picture was taken from the sideline and despicts a punt, but who would know it? Contrast with plate VI. It is used first, to confirm the author's statements to the effect that the sidelines are n...
-Plate XII. A Short Lateral Forward Pass
(a) INCEPTION THE ball was put in play at the point X. The offense were in open formation. The ball was snapped to quarterback who, by running back-ward and laterally toward the camera, drew all seve...
-Plate XIII. The Boomerang
JUST prior to the taking of this picture Harvard had possession of the ball. From open formation she attempted to gain (from left to right) by a forward pass which should have been thrown to a point a...
-Plate XIV. The Pursuit
HERE is a pass which went wrong. At the beginning of this play Yale had ball on Harvard's six yard line (see goal post at extreme upper left of picture). Fi i she tried a lateral forward pass. Harvar...
-Plate XV. A Defensive Triumph
THIS aero-view portrays all the defensive players, in proper position and using their hands to keep free from the opposing players. The offense are attempting to flank the defensive left end, who can...
-II. The Fifty-Year Battle Between The Offense And Defense
THAT full appreciation of the tremendous developments which have been wrought in the game may be realized, let us revert to the origin of football in this country, follow the various changes in the pl...
-Plate XVI. An Offensive Victory
IN utter contrast to Plate XIV the offense have succeeded in rounding the left flank of the first line of defense and still has one interferer free for the second defensive line. Note the extended con...
-Plate XVIII. (A) Clever Defensive Methods
IN the upper picture, an offensive sweep around the left flank of the defense is well under way, with three interferers ahead of the runner. One is in contract with defensive player (1), another appea...
-Plate XIX. Pressing The Kicker
THE ball was originally put in play from open formation on the forty-five yard line (designated by white stake on further sideline.) It has been passed back to player on extreme right who has just ex-...
-Plate XX. An Opening In The Line
THIS picture shows the value of the second line of defense when the primary line has been overcome or split apart. The offense, by faking a sweep toward their left, opened an enormous hole in the oppo...
-Plate XXI. A Fingernail Tackle
(a) THE upper picture shows offense advancing from right to left. The play started as a wide slant on defensive right tackle, but the runner (1), seeing a large hole inside this point, decided to tak...
-Plate XXII. The Elusive Pigskin
(a) IN attempting to rush from their own twenty yard line, the offense (playing from left to right) fumbled the ball, which it would seem (in the top picture) was about to be recovered by either of t...
-Plate XXIII. Where Is The Ball?
THE author ca not resist the temptation of allowing the observer to solve this mystery alone, however, to assist the uninitiated, the plate depicts the offense in the act of executing a forward pass f...
-III. Pre-Season Preparation
FOR FORTY YEARS Germany planned her attack on France, convinced that as a result of her careful preparations she could crush her adversary within a few months. Not only did she mobilize in an incredib...
-Plate XXIV. Too Many Defense
THE offense (playing from left to right) have succeeded in slipping a back past the defensive right tackle. The two defensive players in front of the rmner were swept aside by the one offensive interf...
-Plate XXV. A Powerful Rush
THE defense resemble a spiral spring with the goal line as its base. The greater the compression, the stronger the resistance. In spite of this truism this play gained nine yards straight through the ...
-IV. The Campaign
THE FOOTBALL season proper is a race against time. Its duration is approximately ten weeks, but allowing for seven or eight games there remains only time enough for some fifty practice sessions, which...
-IV. The Campaign. Continued
As in the training of all other groups of human beings for any concerted action, it is necessary to establish and maintain strict discipline among football players throughout the whole season. This no...
-Plate XXVI. Passive Interference
THE offense (playi to left) put the ball in play at a point in line with official standing in . From open formation it was passed to the kicker (not in picture) who first made pretense to drop kick, t...
-Plate XXVII. A Decoy
WHEN the offense attempt a play the nature of which at its is not clear, the problems of the defense are, first, ascertain the nature of the (kick, run or pass); second, if a pass, to locate the le to...
-V. Medical Aspect Of The Game
TIME OUT, yells the referee as twenty-one players untangle themselves from a seething, struggling mass of humanity. The twenty-second man lies flat on the ground, to all outward appearances dead, whi...
-Plate XXVIII. A Touchdown
THE offense are seen scoring a touchdown. The ball was put in play a yard from the goal line (opposite stake on further side line). The play was directed against the defensive left guard. The left sid...
-Plate XXIX. Held For Downs
THE offense on fourth down with less than a yard to go for a touchdown very prop-erly chose a plunge as a scoring play. The defensive line, however, not only obtained a superior charge tmder their op...
-VI. The Intelligence Department
1D0 NOT know who first applied the title of scouts to the men who are regularly assigned to the task of gathering information for the various football camps. It was a most unfortunate designation, b...
-Plate XXX. Bodily Contact
LIKE the schemes of mice and men, football plays often go awry. This picture shows players lying on the ground in utter confusion, showing mat the offensive move, though carefully devised, was wrecked...
-VII. The Attack
FOOTBALL is a miniature war game played under somewhat more civilized rules of conduct, in which the team becomes the military force of the school or university which it represents. In fact most of th...
-VII. The Attack. Part 2
The number of plays which can be run from these formations is almost limitless. There are perhaps fifty or sixty good ones, but it is quite impossible to teach that number thoroughly to any team in on...
-VII. The Attack. Part 3
The signals which inform the players of their various moves might be termed a number language. By calling off a series of numbers the quarterback tells his team-mates which man is to take the ball, wh...
-VIII. The Defense
THE WORD defense is psychologically poor, in that it implies that the team is defending itself against an attack. If some phrase could be invented which would denote that a team is not defending its...
-VIII. The Defense. Continued
Under these circumstances, the question might well be raised, as to why the offense do not always assume an open formation. In answer, although the player in kicker's position does cause a widening of...
-IX. A Game In Detail
IN ORDER to make the subject more realistic, the author will now describe a hypothetical game between two teams of about equal strength, which have been trained along similar lines of offensive and de...
-IX. A Game In Detail. Part 2
What would you do were you in the quarterback's place? Remember that as we approached the goal line each succeeding first down was gained with greater effort. The enemy's line is greatly reinforced by...
-IX. A Game In Detail. Part 3
Third period. During the intermission, which lasts fifteen minutes, the wind died down appreciably so that when our team, which is again playing against it, kicks off, it is able to send the ball almo...
-X. The Wherefore Of Football
FOOTBALL, of necessity, is a rough and strenuous game; of necessity, because as long as sturdy, eager, striving youths come into direct bodily contact, more or less bumps and bruises and even serious ...
-X. The Wherefore Of Football. Continued
The men are taught by talks and blackboard demonstrations, and then are required to go through field demonstrations at slow speed, so that each one will get an actual visualization as well as theory o...









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previous page: American Football | by Walter Camp
  
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next page: Football For Player And Spectator | by Fielding H. Yost