Indian Dance, Blackfoot Reservation.

Indian Dance, Blackfoot Reservation.

Blackfoot Brave And Pony.

Blackfoot Brave And Pony.

Indian Camp, Blackfoot Reserve

Indian Camp, Blackfoot Reserve.

There are at present in the Dominion about one hundred thousand Indians, including Eskimo. The treatment given them by the government has been attended with considerable success. In many instances they have received money for the lands of which they have been dispossessed ; annual subsidies are paid them ; and reservations have been granted them, from which intoxicating liquors are, as far as possible, excluded. The Indian Service of Canada is composed of a body of trained men, who usually remain in it for life, and thoroughly understand the Indian character. Canada, too, has been careful to keep her treaties with the natives, although not hesitating to visit them with punishment when necessary. Industrial and farm schools have been established among them, the results of which are said to be excellent. Moreover, the government now holds a capital sum of nearly four million dollars belonging to the Indians, and administers it for their benefit. Official returns are regularly made from every agency of the earnings of the Indians, and these recently amounted in one year to one million, six hundred thousand dollars. All this was earned by their in fishing, hunting, lumbering, loading ships, acting as guides, and selling products of their own manufacture. Order is maintained throughout the entire Northwest, both among the Indians and the much more troublesome half-breeds, by the Northwest Mounted Police, a body of seven hundred and fifty men, whose record has for years received unqualified praise. The members of this force are armed like soldiers, so as to fight collectively, yet have authority to act individually as constables. The officers, too, are empowered to serve as magistrates - a combination which makes it possible to extend law and order over such enormous areas. These men are distinguished not alone for personal bravery, but for their tact and wisdom in dealing with the natives. One constable has sometimes ridden directly into a camp containing hundreds of armed savages, and carried off single-handed a member of the tribe who was wanted for trial on a charge of murder. As an illustration of how the Indians regard this Mounted Police of Canada, Crowfoot, the chief of the powerful Blackfoot tribe, made the following statement: "In the United States, when one of our young men does anything wrong, and they want to punish him, a troop of soldiers surrounds the camp and begins shooting into it, killing our women and children. Here in Canada, when they want an Indian for doing something wrong, a red-coat comes right off into the camp, and we give up the young man he wants, for we know that if he is the wrong man they will let him go again." Scattered over a vast territory, at stations sometimes hundreds of miles from one another, and not connected by telegraph, it is wonderful that this remarkable force of men has accomplished, practically without bloodshed, all that has been required of it. Its success, with such small numbers and under such difficulties, also speaks volumes for the justice and fair dealing which stand behind it.

Mounted Police. Prairie Uniform.

Mounted Police. Prairie Uniform.

Mounted Police. Parade Uniform.

Mounted Police. Parade Uniform.

A Group Of Cree Indians.

A Group Of Cree Indians.

Calgary, From Elbow River.

Calgary, From Elbow River.

It is at Calgary, the principal city of Alberta, charmingly situated near the junction of the Bow and Elbow rivers, that the west-bound tourist usually gains his first glimpse of the snow-crowned Rockies, gleaming through sixty miles of sunshine in the clear, transparent atmosphere, and dominating intervening tiers of foothills, which gradually rise to meet them, like successive terraces leading to some resplendent dwelling of the gods. I never shall forget the thrill of pleasure which this vision gave me, after the long-continued vista of unbroken prairies on which I had been traveling for a thousand miles. For, though the plains had been extremely interesting and impressive, they could not rouse in me that exultation and delight which I invariably feel in presence of majestic mountains domed with snow.