The Asulkan Glacier And Pass, Mount Dawson In Centre.

The Asulkan Glacier And Pass, Mount Dawson In Centre.

Hermit Range, From Glacier House.

Hermit Range, From Glacier House.

Mount Cheops, From Mount Abbott.

Mount Cheops, From Mount Abbott.

Canadian Crevasses.

Canadian Crevasses.

Eagle Peak, Uto Peak, And Mount Sir Donald.

Eagle Peak, Uto Peak, And Mount Sir Donald.

Mount Sik Donald And Part Of Glacier.

Mount Sik Donald And Part Of Glacier.

Mount Sir Donald, Showing Foot Of Illecillewaet Glacier.

Mount Sir Donald, Showing Foot Of Illecillewaet Glacier.

The sovereign of the Selkirks is Sir Donald, a Cyclopean pyramid of rock and ice, nearly eleven thousand feet in height, and named in honor of one of the most energetic promoters of the metaled pathway winding round its base. This Canadian Matter-horn rears its stupendous peak in full view of the hotel situated near the Illecillewaet Glacier, and is indeed the principal reservoir supplying that vast sea of ice. Superbly dominant and defiant, Sir Donald was, for a long time, a goal ardently desired by mountaineers. Such are, however, the difficulties of its conquest, that the Canadian Pacific Railway made, several years ago, the offer of one thousand dollars and a free pass for life to the first hero who should reach its summit. What an experienced and world-fa m e d A1-pine climber like Mr. Edward Whym-p e r would say of the difficulties of its ascent, I should much like to know. But his opinion of the opportunities in Canada for such work as he himself achieved in the days when he first conquered the redoubtable " Fiend of the Alps," is indicated by the words attributed to him in a recent interview, after his return from an investigation of these peaks, accompanied by four Swiss guides.

He is reported to have said, " If all the mountain climbers in the world were to make a combined attempt to explore the Canadian Rockies, their task would not be ended in a century." Mount Sir Donald is an object of transcendent beauty or sublimity, according as the sunshine makes its apex glorious, or wrathful tempests tear to shreds the snow upon its naked breast. The sight of sunrise on this gleaming monolith is one of the most treasured recollections of my life. Indeed, I think it may have been the memory of some of the sunrise visions in the Selkirks that has since led me to spend the greater part of two winters in the immediate presence of majestic Alpine scenery, where, morning after morning, from my bedroom windows, I have been able, with perfect comfort and protection, to watch the sumptuous splendor of the dawn fall upon radiant, snow-clad mountains. The privilege of beginning every day with such an indescribably inspiring view, I esteem one of the greatest joys and blessings possible to an appreciative soul. I find in my journal the following lines, entitled.

Taking It Coolly.

Taking It Coolly.

Sunrise In The Selkirks

Like snow-white tents, their tapering forms

Indent the western sky; The jeweled gifts of countless storms

Upon their summits lie.

Sicamous Lake, British Columbia.

Sicamous Lake, British Columbia.

The golden moon, with fading scars, Sinks toward their frosty spires;

Around them pale the wearied stars, Like waning bivouac fires.

Stray cloudlets, reddening one by one, Like rose leaves half unfurled,

Herald the coming of the sun To an awakening world.

Sunrise.

Sunrise.

Now the chief peak hath caught the glow,

And, soft, o'er sloping walls And buttresses of dazzling snow,

The flood of splendor falls.

Miles of enameled pink and gold

Incrust the blue of space. While bands of amethyst enfold

Each mountain's massive base.

Gone are the tents that pierced the skies;

But in their place, more fair, Transfigured flowers of Paradise

Bloom in the crystal air.

Fraser Canon.

Fraser Canon.