books



previous page: Jerusalem | John Stoddard's Lectures
  
page up: Travel Books
  
next page: Genoa | John Stoddard's Lectures

Florence | John Stoddard's Lectures



Florence. Illustrated and embellished with views of the world's famous places and people, being the identical discourses delivered during the past eighteen years under the title of the Stoddard lectures.

TitleFlorence - John L. Stoddard's Lectures
AuthorJohn L. Stoddard
PublisherNorwood Press
Year1901
Copyright1901, John L. Stoddard
AmazonJohn L. Stoddard's Lectures 13 Volume Set
-Florence
I Like a well-made, modern building better than any ruin in the world. And I would rather see a ruin, if it possessed historic interest, than the best modern structure ever framed. They were A...
-Florence. Part 2
For Humanity sweeps onward; where to-day the martyr stands, On the morrow crouches Judas with the silver in his hands. Far in front the Cross stands ready and the crackling fagots burn, While the hoo...
-Florence. Part 3
Nor is modern art wanting here. In the rear of Cellini's masterpiece stands a magnificent group completed by the Florentine sculptor, Fedi, in 1865. It represents a painful subject in mythology, - the...
-Florence. Part 4
Among them are Dante, the virtual founder of the Italian language, and one of the three great epic poets of the world; Boccaccio, singer of love; Petrarch, composer of the unrivaled sonnets; Machiavel...
-Florence. Part 5
The apartment of greatest value in the Uffizi is a small octagonal room called the Tribune. No single room of any gallery in the world contains so many masterpieces as this. Its walls are hung with wo...
-Florence. Part 6
It was the hour of noon when I arrived on the Lung' Arno, the very time when one would naturally expect to see some business traffic here; and yet its sidewalks were deserted. The reason was apparent;...
-Florence. Part 7
In a Florentine street where I resided for some time, I often passed a handsome monument erected to Prince Demidoff. The story of the man whom it commemorates is quite romantic. Although himself a Rus...
-Florence. Part 8
The Staircase. The Armory. Climbing the ancient staircase, up which so many had preceded us, we entered one of the halls of the Bargello. At present, the building is neither a palace nor a p...
-Florence. Part 9
The House Of Michelangelo. One of the most peculiar works of art in Florence is the mask of a satyr, carved by Michelangelo when a boy fifteen years of age. Lorenzo the Magnificent, who then gove...
-Florence. Part 10
The Tomb Of Lorenzo De' Medici. The Night which here thou seest thus sweetly sleeping, Was by an angel carved in this pure stone; Because she sleeps, she is alive; Awake her, if thou doubtes...
-Florence. Part 11
Ghiberti's Gates. Exterior Of The Cathedral. A Corner Of The Cathedral. Superior even to the walls of this cathedral, encrusted though they are with marble panels, is the especial g...
-Florence. Part 12
In harmony with the rest of the edifice, the entire front of the Duomo rises before the spectator like a splendid screen of marble marquetry, adorned with sculptured flowers, fruits, and garlands, amo...
-Florence. Part 13
The Ponte Vecchio is not only the oldest of the six bridges which cross the Arno, it is also the most picturesque. Unlike all other bridges I have ever seen, it has two thoroughfares (one above the ot...
-Florence. Part 14
Dupre's Cain And Abel. Victory, In The Pitti. The Room Of The Madonna Of The Chair. Among the paintings in this palace is one before which every visitor must pause, though all th...
-Florence. Part 15
Monument To Luigi Cherubini. The Church of Santa Croce is the Westminster Abbey of Florence, - the recognized shrine of Italian genius. Here are the tombs of Michelangelo, Galileo, and the po...
-Florence. Part 16
Mrs. Browning's Tomb. Even if you refuse to purchase, she will at least contrive to slip a nosegay into your hand or toss a bunch of roses into your carriage, and if you accept them, she consider...
-Florence. Part 17
The Venus Of Canova. Thorvaldsen. The eternal difference between the Master and His pupils is that the breath of life, the living soul, is the work of the former alone. Could the sculptor im...
-Florence. Part 18
The Cloister. A Corner Of The Loggia Of Vincigliata. Crowning a cypress-covered hill, three miles from Florence, stands the old monastery of La Certosa, its white walls glistening in the...
-Florence. Part 19
Interior Of The Church Of La Certosa. Pleasant Dreams. Upon the hill of Bellosguardo, overlooking Florence and the valley of the Arno, stands a structure, which, although unpretending and we...
-Florence. Part 20
In Italy the dead have festivals as well as the living, and on the first and second days of November this cemetery is the favorite resort of Florentines. Beautiful floral decorations are then lavished...









TOP
previous page: Jerusalem | John Stoddard's Lectures
  
page up: Travel Books
  
next page: Genoa | John Stoddard's Lectures