Range. - North America east of the Plains, breeding from central Canada, south to the Gulf coast, and wintering south of our borders.

This well known species is sooty brownish black, 5.5 inches long, and has the tail feathers terminating in sharp spines. They are very abundant in all portions of their range, and may be seen on the wing at all hours of the day, but especially abundant in the early morning and toward dusk. They formerly dwelt and bred only in hollow trees, and a great many still continue to do so, as large hollow stumps are known where hundreds nest every year. The majority of the eastern Chimney Swifts now nest in old chimneys that are unused, at least during the summer; some small chimneys contain but a single pair while other large ones may have from fifty to a hundred or more nests glued to the sides. The birds are on the wing during the greater part of the day, generally not frequenting the vicinity of their nesting site, but returning toward dusk, when they may be seen to, one at a time, dive headforemost into the tops of chimneys. The nest is made of small twigs firmly glued to the sides of the chimney, or tree, and to each other, with the glutinous saliva of the bird, making a narrow semi-circle platform for the reception of their three to five white eggs which are deposited in May or June; size .75 x .50.

Chimney Swift

Chimney Swift.

423 Chimney Swift Chcetura Pelagica 825

422-424

NEST AND EGGS OF CHIMNEY SWIFT

E. R. Forrest NEST AND EGGS OF CHIMNEY SWIFT.

423 Chimney Swift Chcetura Pelagica 829423 Chimney Swift Chcetura Pelagica 830White

White.