Some of us have natural artistic talent, some acquire it, and others of us plod along in a groove bordering on commercialism, with no thought of anything but the cash receipts. We do have the faculty of pleasing the public and getting the price for our work, however, and for this reason the United States has, by some artistic foreigners, been likened unto one big Cash Register.

American photographers have also been credited with making all American women appear as Duchesses in their photographs of them, but that is certainly nothing against either the photographer or our women, and we wouldn't have them look differently even if we could.

We Mill admit that there is a great deal of commercialism in American photography, just as there is in all things American, but we also have much artistic talent as well, and this talent compares not at all unfavorably with that of photographers across the water. For example, it is seldom that we have had the pleasure of seeing such freshness, such frankness and simplicity as that shown in the Child-Portraiture of W. C. Noetzel, of Newton Center, Mass. Not only does he show himself to be a master in this most difficult branch of work, but his pictures of menand women are of an equally high degree of merit. One is not surprised at seeing a half dozen examples of beautiful work from a photographer these days, especially if he has some one line of work in which he excels, but to see dozens of pictures, any of which would be hard to criticise, seems rather remarkable.

From An Etching Black Platinum Print By W. C. Noetzel Newton Center, Mass.

From An Etching Black Platinum Print By W. C. Noetzel Newton Center, Mass.

In looking over the work, one almost invariably says, "He must be a painter of portraits," but Mr. Noetzel paints only with his mind, the camera and his printing medium. The secret of his beautiful Child-Portraiture seems to be in his ability to secure the confidence of his subject, grasp the character that lies underneath the shell of formality and bring it to the surface in trusting obedience to his will. The result is not a catch-as-catch-can picture of a child, but a serious portrait full of natural, childish expression, beautifully lighted, and looking almost squarely at you with eyes full of confidence. A beautiful picture with nothing to detract from the point of interest. The backgrounds are always harmonious, the lightings, soft and round, and the prints of that wonderful texture so elusive of description but most closely approaching the tone and texture of an old etching.

A remarkable thing about these child pictures by Mr. Noetzel is that in most instances they are large 8x10 heads. This may only seem strange to us because we are accustomed to seeing full figure pictures of children, and this, again, may be due to the fact that many of us do not have enough confidence in our ability to successfully make large heads of children, but the fact remains that these pictures are delightfully free from the distressing and detracting influence of accessories. Not only this, but all the expression of the childish eyes and mouth is retained in these pictures in a most natural and pleasing way.

Such pictures are not only appreciated by the customer, but the work of such a man as Mr. Noetzel can not fail to have an influence for good upon our entire profession. He is in love with his work, puts his whole soul into it and is anxious to do all he can to help the forward movement of modern photographic portrait work. There is an especial satisfaction to us in reproducing Mr. Noetzel's work in this issue of Studio Light because we know that such work is worth study on the part of every professional photographer.

"Watch the photographer who uses Artura'

From An Etching Black Platinum Print By W. C. Noetzel.

From An Etching Black Platinum Print By W. C. Noetzel.

Newton Center, Mass.

From An Etching Black Platium Print By W. C. Noetzel Newton Center, Mass.

From An Etching Black Platium Print By W. C. Noetzel Newton Center, Mass.