When the allied planes attack Mannheim, the point at which they aim to drop their bombs is the great Badische dye works just outside the city. This is the largest dye works in Germany and has been converted very largely from its original purpose to the manufacture of high explosives and poison gases. It was because the manufacturers of dyes had available a large force of research chemists that Germany was able to produce so quickly the explosives and the poison gases for the war. This was an important part of Germany's plan of preparedness.

The mobilization of the largest force of chemists in the world at Washington for work on poison gases shows how vital research in organic chemistry is at the present time. One of the great advantages of German research chemists before the war was the possession of a ready source of the chemicals from which their work could be started, the production of these rare chemical reagents being a monopoly in the hands of a few German firms. With the cutting off of the German supply it became necessary for American research chemists to make their own chemicals for research work. This occasioned delays in important work - delays which could only be lessened to a small extent by the efforts of our universities, a few of which came forward and made some of the chemicals that were required. In order to make sure that the chemists of this country may for all time be independent of German chemists and their products, and may have an adequate supply of the chemicals necessary for such research work as this war has shown to be an important preparedness measure, the Eastman Kodak Company has arranged to establish a department of its Research Laboratory to make these rare chemicals. The work will be done exclusively by women chemists as assistants, the nature of the work being such that it is considered suitable for them. It presents an opportunity for women to take an active part in chemical work of national importance. The new laboratory will be under the charge of Dr. H. T. Clarke, and it is expected that before long German monopoly in the production of the reagents necessary for chemical research work will be a thing of the past.

There's a picture of you in your soldier's memory. But he is expecting a new one, as you are to day, to take its place.

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Make the appointment to-day.

THE PYRO STUDIO

Line cut No. 254. Price, 50 cents.

Strafing A German Monopoly StudioLightMagazine1918 159

FROM AN ARTURA IRIS PRINT

By Fred H. Reed Wichita, Kans.

STUDIO LIGHT INCORPORATING THE ARISTO EAGLE ESTABLISHED 1901 THE ARTURA BULLETIN ESTABLISHED 1906 Vol.10 SEPTEMBER 1918 No. 7