Notice of acceptance to the offeror himself is sufficient if he has not prescribed some other method of acceptance. Notice of acceptance may be given to one whom the offeror has permitted to act as his duly authorized agent.1 On the other hand, notice of acceptance, given to one who is the agent of the offeree for some purposes, but not for the purpose of receiving such acceptance, is inoperative.2 Acceptance of an offer must be communicated to the offeror or to his authorized agent.3

3 Owenby v. Georgia Baptist Assembly, 137 Ga. 608, 74 S. E. 56; Strong v. Eldridge, 8 Wash. 595, 36 Ac. 696 (in this case a subscription "I agree to subscribe $1,500 towards getting the foundry at Fairhaven," was enforced by the owners of such foundry).

4 Whitney v. Wyman, 101 U. S. 392, 25 L. ed. 1050; Stanton v. New York & Eastern R. R. Co., 59 Conn. 272, 21 Am. St. Rep. 110, 22 Atl. 300; Work v. Welsh, 160 111. 468, 43 N. E. 719; Merchants' Bldg. Imp. Co. v. Chicago Exch. Bldg. Co., 210 111. 26, 71 N. E. 22; Lauder v. Peoria Agricultural and Trotting Society, 71 111. App. 475; Omaha, etc., Co. v. Goodman, 62 Neb. 197, 86 N. W. 1082. See Sec. 1002.

5 Merchants' Building Improvement

Co. v. Chicago Exchange Building Co., 210 111. 26, 71 N. E. 22.

6 Farmers' Bank v. Smith, 105 Ky. 816, 88 Am. St. Rep. 341, 49 S. W. 810; Low v. R. R., 45 N. H. 370.

Contra: Weatherford, etc., Ry. v. Granger, 86 Tex. 350, 40 Am. St. Rep. 837, 24 S. W. 795. See upon this question ch. LVII.

7 In re Adams, L. R. 27 Ch. D. 394; Gustin v. Union School District, 94 Mich. 502, 34 Am. St. Rep. 361, 54 N. W. 156; McCormick v. Stephany, 57 N. J. Eq. 257, 41 Atl. 840.

1 Trollinger v. Fleer, 157 N. Car. 81, 72 S. E. 795.

2 New v. Germania Fire Ins. Co., 171 Ind. 33, 85 N. E. 703.

3 Moneyweight Scale Co. v. Gordon Mercantile Co., 102 S. Car. 419, 86 S. E. 1060.

A communication to a stranger made by the offeree and showing his intention to accept, is insufficient, even if the offeror learns of it eventually.4 A contract may, of course, be made through brokers and the principals may never meet personally.5