If the intent to deceive exists, but the action of the party deceived is different from that contemplated, fraud is, nevertheless, held to exist if the other elements thereof exist.1 Thus where the directors wished to deceive the stockholders into thinking the corporation better than it was, a stockholder who in reliance thereon refused an offer for his stock of eighty dollars cash and accepted the alternative offer of fifty dollars cash and fifty dollars more if ten per cent, dividends were paid thereon during the ensuing year, can hold such directors for fraud, though they did not contemplate such action.2

11 See Sec. 428.

12 See Sec. 462 et seq.

13 See Sec. 428 and 457.

14 See ch. XVI. 15 See ch. XVII.

1 Atlas Shoe Co. v. Bechard, 102 Me. 197, 10'L. R. A. (N.S.) 245, 66 Atl. 390; Hauptman v. Pike, 77 Neb. 105, 108 N. W. 163; Grever v. Taylor, 53 O. S. 621, 42 N. E. 829; Gainesville National Bank v. Bamberger, 77 Tex. 48, 19 Am. St. Rep. 738, 13 S. W. 959.

2 Atlas Shoe Co. v. Bechard, 102 Me. 197, 10 L. R. A. (N.S.) 245, 66 Atl. 390.

3 Atlas Shoe Co. v. Bechard, 102 Me. 197, 10 L. R. A. (N.S.) 245, 66 Atl. 390.

4 Gainesville National Bank v. Bamberger, 77 Texas 48, 19 Am. St. Rep. 738, 13 S. W. 959.

5 Hauptman v. Pike, 77 Neb. 105, 108 N. W. 163.

6 Beacon Falls Rubber Shoe Co. v. Pratte, 190 Mass. 72, 76 N. E. 285.

7 Beacon Falls Rubber Shoe Co. v. Pratte, 190 Mass. 72, 76 N. E. 285.