If the party who makes the false representations prevents such investigation as would disclose the falsity of such statements by means of further deceit, a partial examination, or a total omission to make an examination, does not prevent fraud from existing.1 Thus A's making false statements to B as to the quantity of timber on certain land, and A's agent showing B a part of the land on which the timber was much better than on the rest and assuring B that this was a fair average;2 or pointing out improvements on adjoining land as being on the land conveyed;3 or employing unfair means to make the examination incomplete,4 such as a pretense of haste,5 or by artifice in testing a patented article,6 or bribing an agent appointed by B for such examination to make a false report,7 will constitute fraud though some examination was made.

8 Kelley v. Owens (Cal.), 30 Ac. 59ft; Boyd v. Sniffer, 156 Pa. St. 100, 27 At!. 60.

9 Barrie v. Miller, 104 Ga. 312, 69 Am. St. Rep. 171, 30 S. E. 840.

11 Goring v. Fitzgerald, 105 la. 507, 75 N. W. 358.

11 Morrow v. Bonebrake, 84 Kan. 724, 34 L. R. A. (N.S.) 1147, 115 Ac. 585.

12 Morrow v. Bonebrake, 84 Kan. 724, 34 L. R. A. (N.S.) 1147, 115 Ac. 585.

1 Mather v. Barnes, 146 Fed. 1000;

Wainscott v. Occidental Association, 98 Cal. 253, 33 Ac. 88; Brotherton v. Reynolds, 164 Pa. St. 134, 30 Atl. 234.

2 Brotherton v. Reynolds, 164 Pa. St. 134, 30 Atl. 234.

3 Carmichael v. Vandebur, 50 la. 651.

4 Wainscott v. Loan Association, 98 Cal. 253, 33 Ac. 88.

5 Brady v. Finn, 162 Mass. 260, 38 N. E. 506.

6 Gardner v. Trenary, 65 la. 646, 22 N. W. 912.