Inadequacy of consideration is therefore, except in its most extreme forms, merely a circumstance among others to be used in determining whether fraud or undue influence exists.1 Among the facts which in combination with inadequacy of consideration establish fraud or undue influence are confidential relations between the parties, weakness of mind of the party receiving the inadequate consideration, misstatement, non-disclosure, mistake of fact or law, and circumstances of oppression and concealment. The effect of combinations of these facts will accordingly next be considered.

2 Pickering v. Pickering, 2 Bea. 31; Wheeler v. Smith, 50 U. S. (9 How.) 55, 13 L. ed. 44; Jordan v. Stevens, 51 Me. 78, 81 Am. Dec. 556; Sykes v. Moore, 115 Miss. 508, 76 So. 538.

3Jordan v. Stevens, 51 Me. 78, 81 Am. Dec. 556.

4 Sykes v. Moore, 115 Miss. 508, 76 So. 538.

1 See Sec. 635 et seq.

2 See ch. LXXXIX.

1 Lewis v. Arhuckle, 85 la. 335, 16 L. R. A. 677, 52 N. W. 237; Pusic v. Salak, - Pa. St. - , 104 Atl. 751; Causey v. Seaboard A. L. R. Co., 166 N. Car. 5, L. R. A. 1915E, 1185, 81 S. E. 017; McPhaul v. Walters, 167 N. Car. 182, 83 S. E. 321; Mann v. Rus-sey, 101 Tenn. 596, 49 S. W. 835; Talbott v. Manard, 106 Tenn. 60, 59 S. W. 340; Stephens v. Ozbourne, 107 Tenn. 572, 89 Am. St. Rep. 957, 64 S. W. 902.